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Old 11-28-2007, 01:50 PM
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Dry Guide Coat?

I'm on the final laps of the bodywork on my Mustang project. I keep hearing about dry guide coat (think it's graphite powder of some kind). Any pros / cons? Everything is block sanded to 180 and was thinking I'd guide coat and sand to 320 then 500. I used SPI 2K so it showed low spots real good, but I want to be sure I didn't miss any. Was hoping to avoid wet sanding.

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Old 11-28-2007, 01:56 PM
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3M Dry Guide Coat works great, but it's a bit pricey at around $35 for a tub. The tub will do about 3 cars though. I like it because it will not clog sand paper and you can wet sand with it if you like.

Vince
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Old 11-28-2007, 05:40 PM
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guide coat.......

hi,go to home depot and buy a few spray cans of the cheapest black paint..spray the paint over your putty,(or primer) just a good dust coat,dont try to paint the car black. after it dries,start sanding,the black paint will lay in the places that are low,and need more putty or primer. guide coats are to show where you need more filling or sanding. have fun. ive painted probably 35 yachts, and 45 or so cars,and always used that paint as a guide coat........more info,i always took a magic marker,and drew a circle around the places that needed more work,then removed the cheap spray paint using acetone. after finishing the repair,i also wiped the magic marker off,you guys are correct,dont leave the cheap paint,clean it all off. sorry,i should have put the rest of the info in. if the paint gums up your paper,WAIT until the spray paint dries.....then sand it.

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Old 11-28-2007, 06:02 PM
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Boatbob2,

With all the chatter on our painting forums about not having any "cheapo" primer or paint anywhere on a car including under the finish coat, wouldn't you have to insure that ALL of the rattle can paint is sanded off each time you apply a primer and a guide coat?
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Old 11-28-2007, 07:25 PM
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My thoughts exactly cboy, but the same goes for the dry guide coat. I'm sure that can't be left behind, but what do you do about where it is in pits and low spots, can I just blow it out with an air nozzle?

I have tried the cheap paint approach and I just don't get along with it. I have to wet sand it or it gums up the paper. Either way it's a mess. I know the dry stuff is expensive, but but it helps move things along, it might be worth it. I was wondering if there was a ch** dry alternative.

Here's a promotional video on it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3B4VWA4cE4
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Old 11-28-2007, 07:27 PM
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Only problem with using rattle can paint is the low spots. You must remove it before recoating with primer or risk lifting. The 3M Dry Guide coat is fool proof and beats cheap rattle cans all to &^%$ IMO.

Update, it comes right off with wax & grease remover, or soap & water.

Vince
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Old 11-28-2007, 08:54 PM
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The Dry Guide sounds like a very good alternative...providing it shows up nice and clear. And $35 for a couple of cars sounds like a small price to pay...maybe less expensive than a few rattle cans.

I don't know about you, but personally I like to shoot a final "guide coat" in a glossy finish. It seems to really show up the waves and ripples better. Maybe it's just the way my eyes work (or the fact that they are getting sort of old), but I have a hard time seeing imperfections in the flat primers. But they'll jump right out at me when I shoot a gloss coat and then hit it with a light sanding.

I used to shoot the gloss coat in lacquer (and final in SS urethane). But now that lacquer has become either unavailable or in some cases, more expensive than a decent single stage urethane, I'm taking a different route. When I do the sedan delivery, I intend to shoot a gloss coat of ss black urethane and then roll the car out into the mid day sun to give it good once over for waves and ripples. I'll then scuff sand this gloss coat and apply my urethane BC/CC. I know this is going to be more expensive (and more time consuming) than just using primer as a guide coat or even the 3M Dry Guide...but it seems to be the best system for me and the way my eyes happen to work.
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Old 11-28-2007, 09:03 PM
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dry guide coat is all I use, no rattle cans. Its a far superior method then spraying your guide coat on as the dry will highlight ANY imperfection unlike spray bombs.
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Old 11-28-2007, 10:03 PM
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I have to say, I used the first dry guide coat for literally a year or more in the shop on filler before I had to get a refill. I will NEVER go back to aerosol cans again! It has no overspray, it is PERFECT every time. No clogged nozzles, no spitting large dropets, just a perfect application without even trying. It fills EVERY single scratch, even the tiniest 600-800 grit scatches will show up.

I am sorry, moving away from aerosol cans is like moving away from lacquer primer, I will never go back.

Brian
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Old 11-28-2007, 10:16 PM
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Well, you've got me convinced...at least to try it. Just ordered the Dry Guide from Eastwood. $33 plus shipping.
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Old 11-29-2007, 06:03 AM
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I use them all.
The dry is the most convenient and fastest.
Especially for small areas you don't want to mask off.
I have even used it on clear for wet sanding-it works.

If you use the cheap spray cans, like at Wal-Mart,
make sure you get the one that labels "sandable primer"
It does sand easier than useing paint.
And the primer is lacquer based, it seems to get in the scratches better.
I still use spray cans, but mostly on a panel that I just primed.
Usually at that stage there's not much for it to show, but it helps me
to not miss any spots and it's easy while the primer is still masked.
I haven't been able to tell any difference between that and the
SEM guidecoat that I bought for 4 times the price.
I think they all work, but only as good as you apply it.
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Old 11-29-2007, 06:17 AM
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Sounds good, I think I wil pick some up.

I was wondering about the clear coat, thats good news.

I'm still a little confused about when to use it. Do you use it at every sanding step? I'm still at the 180 level with my panels and I was going to use the guide coat at 320. But that's pretty fine to be doing any leveling. Maybe I should go back over everything with 180 but with guide coat this time? Now that I'm sitting here thinking about it, yea, when going from say 320 to 500, it would be good to use it so I know where I sanded and if I got the 320 scratches out.

Dang! I'm almost starting get this whole bodywork think!
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Old 11-29-2007, 07:36 AM
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Nothing wrong on useing it on every step.

I only use it on my primer, I use Metalglaze spot putty
over all my filler, It kinda works like a crude guide coat.
I then prime and guide coat for sanding the primer.
But it's all personnal preference and how thorough you are
at sanding without it. But when in doubt, I say use it.
I'm even starting to use it on my wood sanding projects,
(which is what I do in the winter.) for panel glue-ups
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Old 11-29-2007, 08:18 AM
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I use the dry guide coat while sanding the Metal Glaze sometimes. If there is a need to move up to 120 when blocking it (sometimes I do) I then guide coat it before blocking it with the 180 to INSURE that when I prime it there will be nothing coarser than the 180.

Brian
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Old 11-29-2007, 01:34 PM
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Ok, picked it up today so I'll give it a whirl
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