To drywall or not to drywall?? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Garage - Tools
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2005, 06:53 PM
schnitz's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Building a new shop
Last journal entry: Christmas 2008 came early!!!
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, in a house...
Age: 40
Posts: 1,163
Wiki Edits: 54

Thanks: 8
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
To drywall or not to drywall??

***Warning*** This is rather lengthy***

I have finally gotten to the point where I'm temped to load everything in my garage up and start over in a bigger garage (mines a 20' wide by 22' deep with an 8 and a 1/2 foot ceiling). Spring cleaning and a lovingly naggy wife will do that... Anyway, after seeing other photos of garages, I decided to re-work the garage now BEFORE either vehicle in the garage. I've decided to start on the back wall, opposite the main door. Now for a little background.....

In my mind, I've been kicking around the best way to layout the minimal space that I have in my garage to give me the most usable space. Presently, my garage is uninsulated, very under-powered electrically, and is not very well lit. I have a 220 volt line run from my house to the garage from the house concealed in a pvc conduit ( I was planning a bit with that). That is the only electrical perk that I have. There are only 3 110v outlets in my shop now, so I need more power. I don't have a floor mount drill press in there yet, but I am working on acquiring one in some trades. There are plans also in the works for a 20 gallon parts washer and a portable torch ( my Mapp gas torch kit won't always cut it, you know? LOL). Shelf space is almost non-existent.

I also have my Monte on jack stands, my '84 plow truck (the 8' Western blade is sitting in the box) half on stands, the frame from an '81 Regal for my Monte standing on its side between the two, the whole plow assembly for a 7'6" Western in two spots, plus my 2 roll-aways, a 7 foot long cabinet, and a couple of engine stands (with engines on them) to contend with.

I have decided to start the garage revamp in the back area and work to the front by carefully planning the placement of the vitals of any good shop. My air compressor is in the back left corner and that seems to be in a good location to work from. I plan on running a single 110v outlet next to the compressor for the parts washer and a track-type light above it. Above and beside those two items, I plan on having cabinets from the ceiling down to the top edge of the cement block sill (which is stepped midway across the 20 foot span). There will be a spot to the far right top for a spare set of rims and tires for the Monte. I am also going to leave a recessed area for my roll-aways and the torch in the middle of the garage. 1/4" pegboard will be used as a back of the cabinet wall.

Now for the meat of this thread...
I only plan on having 2 outlets on that wall. Will that be enough? Or should I put two in the center having one to the right side and one to the left of the roll-aways? I plan on hard-wiring another track light (or a fluorescent, I haven't totally decided that yet) directly above the boxes.

As far as sheet rocking, white painted plywood or even that textured white plastic, I have no clue what's best for finishing a wall that will have insulation, vapor barrier and 1/4" pegboard also. Any suggestions on that will be greatly appreciated. As I proceed toward the overhead door, I will be finishing the walls and ceiling to match. I wish my budget would allow me to splurge and just finish it all in one shot, but I'm schtucky out of luck with that. I plan on just routing all the wiring to the front where a 100 amp box will be installed as soon as money permits. I want to accomplish this properly and as cost effectively as possible. I'm in bad need of any thoughts to help from anybody that has ever done anything like this.

Thanks again in advance, Chet.

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2005, 07:07 PM
Kevin45's Avatar
Just one of the guys
 

Last journal entry: Garage Toys
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Urbana, Ohio
Age: 58
Posts: 3,060
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Drywall the garage and run your outlets every 6'. You have to run the wire anyways so you might as well splice in and add the outlets. Boxes are cheap and you can get a contractors pack of outlets for next to nothing. Also put them up high enough so you don't have to bend over to plug anything in. For a smaller garage I really like the looks of this one. It belongs to fellow member Roger1. Great use of space and just clean looking to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2005, 07:57 PM
bracketeer's Avatar
489 Lemans
 

Last journal entry: Street Legal
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Courtenay, BC, CehNehDeh
Age: 55
Posts: 2,139
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
pegboard

Pegboard walls are ideal. You can get hooks, hangers, shelves, small cupboards. You can utilize every square inch of wall space.
http://www.kelvin.com/hd_peghooks.html
Electricity. I have my work bench on back wall. Two outlets built into the lower face for power tools.

I have one outlet on the wall with six plugs. This keeps all cords running in the same direction. Less chance of tangled cords.
__________________
[URL]http://members.shaw.ca/g.body.building[/URL]
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2005, 09:17 PM
302 Z28's Avatar  
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: North Texas
Posts: 10,840
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 86 Times in 73 Posts
You need tp install a sub panel for your garage. That way you have virtually an unlimited supply of power and any additions will be short runs.


Kevin for a short while I though that was your garage. It's plain for me to see that not much work goes on in that garage.

Vince
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2005, 09:29 PM
schnitz's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Building a new shop
Last journal entry: Christmas 2008 came early!!!
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, in a house...
Age: 40
Posts: 1,163
Wiki Edits: 54

Thanks: 8
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Holy crap, that garage is so clean I'd eat off the floor! I may cob the air conditioner idea from that one too...
How hard is it to keep the drywall clean? I saw a local garage go from almost that clean to thoroughly filthy in a matter of two years. Funny thing with that was he barely used it. That's why I considered the textured plastic panels. I can get 5/8" drywall dirt cheap thru my brother-in-law, but I'll wind up hauling it 165 miles. Might not be worth it to haul it that far.

As far as running the outlets every 6', should I try to route the wire from one to the next, or have one (or a couple) run off a separate breaker? Also, should I route them through the studs horizontally, or go up and over the roof trusses? Electrical is not a real strong point for me, so the fewer wires, the better in my book. Less chance of burning off hair that I can't really afford to lose.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-12-2005, 10:08 PM
roger1's Avatar
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: San Angelo,TX
Age: 59
Posts: 1,099
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 12
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Kevin, thanks for the compliment. I am flattered.

Vince, I do a lot in this garage. But I took this shot after a cleanup.
And btw, thanks for all your help with my primering questions. I really appreciate it.

Here's how it looks now:



Quote:
Originally posted by schnitz
Holy crap, that garage is so clean I'd eat off the floor! I may cob the air conditioner idea from that one too...
How hard is it to keep the drywall clean? I saw a local garage go from almost that clean to thoroughly filthy in a matter of two years. Funny thing with that was he barely used it. That's why I considered the textured plastic panels. I can get 5/8" drywall dirt cheap thru my brother-in-law, but I'll wind up hauling it 165 miles. Might not be worth it to haul it that far.

As far as running the outlets every 6', should I try to route the wire from one to the next, or have one (or a couple) run off a separate breaker? Also, should I route them through the studs horizontally, or go up and over the roof trusses? Electrical is not a real strong point for me, so the fewer wires, the better in my book. Less chance of burning off hair that I can't really afford to lose.
Shnitz,

Drywall is fine. Just go with a very light texture and use a semi-gloss or hi-gloss paint. On the ceiling, use flat or eggshell paint but if you have the popcorn texture on it, scrape it off.

With a glossy paint, you can just wipe it down with a damp towel if it gets dirty, or you can lightly use something like 409 if you get any greasy dirt on it.

On my garage, I used a roll-on texture that I made from a mud, primer and paint mixture. Then I used Behr Hi-gloss paint from Home Depot.

As far as your electrical, get a how-to book. It is really not that hard to learn.
I would put one wall of outlets on one breaker and put a GFCI on the first outlet that will protect the rest on that line. If you are putting in an AC unit and /or a heater then use a separate dedicated line for that. Also, if you plan to get an electric welder, I would put that on a dedicated circuit also. I would not share the same circuit for lights and outlets. Put your lights on their own breaker.

Roger

Last edited by roger1; 02-12-2005 at 10:08 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 05:20 AM
Kevin45's Avatar
Just one of the guys
 

Last journal entry: Garage Toys
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Urbana, Ohio
Age: 58
Posts: 3,060
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Quote:
As far as running the outlets every 6', should I try to route the wire from one to the next, or have one (or a couple) run off a separate breaker? Also, should I route them through the studs horizontally, or go up and over the roof trusses? Electrical is not a real strong point for me, so the fewer wires, the better in my book. Less chance of burning off hair that I can't really afford to lose
Run one wire to the next. Mount your boxes first. The plastic outlet boxes are usuall $.25 apiece or 3 for $100. Make sure the boxes stick out from the stud the width of the drywall. There will be a mark on the box. And get the type that already has the two nails in them. Drill thru the studs a little below or above where you are going to mount your boxes with a 5/8 or 3/4 spade bit. (the flat bit for wood) Don't worry about the holes being straight either. Just line them up in general. Leave about 2' of wire at the breaker box and start fishing the wire thru the holes. Cut it at the first box leaving about a foot extra. Fish this wire thru the box then roll it up and tuck it into the box. Start at that box and go to the next outlet doing the same thing, If you are going to be running 3 or 4 items at one time, all of the time you will want to break these boxes down to seperate circuite. Normally what I do is one wall of outlets on one circuit, the other long wall on a different circuit, the front wall on a seperate circuit. An air compressor on it's own breaker. All lights should be on their own circuit also. And depending on how many lights you may want to leave them on one circuit but wire in two switches. Post a floor diagram and I will show you how to wire it. And don't forget to add an outlet in the ceiling for a garage door opener.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 07:59 AM
cboy's Avatar
Member
 

Last journal entry: Finished
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Atwater, CA
Age: 69
Posts: 3,918
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 4 Posts
Hey Chet,

When do you intend to do the wiring? If we can work out a time I could drive down and lend you a hand (that way two of us can electrocute ourselves rather than you having to do it all by your lonesome).

And since I have to pass right by the Fleet Farm on my way to your place.......

Dewey
__________________
Always learning...and sharing what I've learned. The Scratch-Built Hot Rod.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 08:24 AM
Tazz
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: amherst,ohio
Age: 66
Posts: 2,049
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
try going to home depote or one of the lumber yards..

some have a program in house to show how to wire and lay out the plaster board to cover the walls...it should tell you how may outlets and lights they would put into a project and give you and idea of how a finished garage space would look.


Tazz


Rat Rods Rule!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 09:04 AM
302 Z28's Avatar  
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: North Texas
Posts: 10,840
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 86 Times in 73 Posts
There is an article in the NEC that specifies how many receptacles can be run from either a 15amp circuit or a 20amp circuit. It is in the neighborhood of 6 I think. When I get to work Monday I will look it up.

roger1, sorry for the "no work" comment about your garage, I'm impressed. Your welcome for the primer help. Get that Vette ready for paint!!!

Vince
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 11:15 AM
daimon1054's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 496
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Watts / Volts = AMPS
so you need to look at what you will be running. A 1500 watt heater will pull 12.5 amps so that is all you should have on that breaker. A compressor should be on it's own if it is 110 volts and such. So lay out where you will have your stuff and wire accordingly. Code for a house says a plug every 6 feet because a lamp has a 3' cord so you will never need an extension cord but that is not really the hot ticket for a shop always. I have a 30 amp 110 plug for my welder 1 for my compressor and 1 for my plasma cutter. I then have 3 plugs behind a small work bench so I can plug lots of stuff there. I also have some bat powered tools so I put a plug where I was putting my chargers so I never have to unplug them. Then I spaced a few plugs here and there. Lights are very important as most have found out so put more then you think you need, shoot some up to the ceiling from the walls so your not blinded when you look up and see a 100 watt bare light like my bumd *** is. The was a dumb move on my part.

As for walls, I like 3/4" plywood because you can hang stuff any where you want just paint it a light color. If you go dry wall make sure your get the thickest you can and you want water proof also.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 11:39 AM
roger1's Avatar
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: San Angelo,TX
Age: 59
Posts: 1,099
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 12
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by 302/Z28
You need tp install a sub panel for your garage. That way you have virtually an unlimited supply of power and any additions will be short runs.

roger1, sorry for the "no work" comment about your garage, I'm impressed. Your welcome for the primer help. Get that Vette ready for paint!!!

Vince
That's OK Vince, I also had prove to someone else that I did do stuff in my garage after I posted that pic in the "Be proud of your garage!" thread.

Shnitz,
Yes, have a electrician install a sub panel for you. It will also be much safer because when the sub-panel breaker in your main panel is off, there will be no power in the sub panel at all.
I would think a 60A sub panel is probably fine for your small garage. If you load up with a big compressor, 220V A/C unit, and a 220V welder, then might need a 100A. Talk to your electrician about it.
Installing a sub panel is something that can be done yourself. But I wouldn't recommend it to someone without much experience with home wiring. Find an electrician that doesn't mind having you watch him work and answering questions. Also, get that book!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 02:40 PM
schnitz's Avatar
Member
 
Last wiki edit: Building a new shop
Last journal entry: Christmas 2008 came early!!!
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Wausau, Wisconsin, in a house...
Age: 40
Posts: 1,163
Wiki Edits: 54

Thanks: 8
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
I talked to my Father-in-law and got a couple of books on wiring from him that are the Black and Decker series books. Those should point me in the right direction. I also talked to an electrician that goes to our church, and he said he'd help out on making all the final connections. I decided that my big cabinet is leaving as soon as I can get it out. I put wheels under it, so moving it should be a ton easier.

I kinda intend to get a welder, but haven't decided on how big to go with. A parts washer tied to a swtched outlet is higher on my list though. My compressor is a 220v coleman powermate 6.5 hp 60 gallon unit (on wheels also). I figure if I'm doing it, I should go with a 100 amp box to start with, and did have thoughts about a 200 amp for a while. That's just out of my budget and is probably overkill anyway.

302, what is the NEC? Is that like a trade magazine for electricians?

Dewey, the help would be greatly appreciated. Fleet Farm is only about 10 minutes from me. Menards is about the same, and the Home Depot is about 15 minutes. All 3 are going to see me visiting the electical departments within a couple of days. Those places should be able to help point me into the right direction too. I have some 14-3 and some 12-3 wire that my dad gave me when we bought the house, so I may save some money and use it between outlets. The 14-3 should be o.k. to use for the ceiling light wiring if I use my brain when routing it. As long as I don't overload it...

Thanks for all the input, Chet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 04:44 PM
daimon1054's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Louisiana
Posts: 496
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Run it for more, in other words if you think in the future you will want more power then run larger wire. That way you can change the panel later for a lot less trouble. Also plan ahead! List what tools you know you have and look on the data plate and it will tell you how many watts it draws, then look at what you want to add short term and figure those watts. Now figure the total AMP draw and you will know what power you need, this way your not stuck if you but the welder and don't have the power to run it or you get a bigger compressor and can't power it.
I think for most shops 100 AMPS is plenty.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2005, 05:10 PM
roger1's Avatar
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: San Angelo,TX
Age: 59
Posts: 1,099
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 12
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
I just re-read the original post.
He has already run the wire from the main box to the garage.

Schnitz,
What guage wire did you run and how long is the run?

Last edited by roger1; 02-13-2005 at 05:15 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Garage - Tools posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:13 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.