Dual Plane Carb Spacer Edelbrock 8714, 8715 - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Engine
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 07-05-2010, 03:41 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Newark Valley, NY
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Dual Plane Carb Spacer Edelbrock 8714, 8715

Anybody use these on top of an Edelbrock Performer? How about machining them to make them more like the air-gap? For use on a sbc 350 vortec marine. Any input would be appreciated.

PS: I found allot of info on this site, pertaining to open and four hole spacers. but not these 2 hole, dual plane type.

    Advertisement

Last edited by JohnSerb; 07-05-2010 at 05:17 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2011, 08:47 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
performer intake spacer

The Performer RPM series manifolds have, for the most part, a spread-bore carburetor interface. Most performance carbs utilize a square bore interface. Thus, the dilemma of properly interfacing a square bore carb to a Performer RPM manifold with the BEST AIR FLOW possible.

Now, when you simply dump a 4-hole, square bore carb into a spread-bore plenum, you are wasting that huge interface offered by the spread-bore interface. There are spacers/adapters that will adapt a square bore carb, to a spread-bore Performer RPM intake quite well... except when dealing with a dual plane Performer RPM manifold. ALL things change when dealing with a Dual Plane!

The philosophy of the dual plane manifold is to segregate the intake plenums into two completely isolated systems. One plenum system (4 cylinders) is fed by the carb's left-side barrels (primary and secondary), and the other isolated plenum system (the other four cylinders) is fed by the carb's right-hand barrels (primary and secondary). NOT A ONE OF THE HGUNDREDS OF ADAPTERS/SPACERS out there address this problem. HVH makes a "divided" square bore spacer for such applications, but they opted to remove half of the height of the divider! This will hinder the manifolds inherent ability to isolate the two previously mentioned plenums. This will in essence turn you state-of-the-art 180 degree dual plane manifold, into a semi-single plane, semi-360 degree manifold. Any way you cut it, you will nullify the advantage of segregated plenums. If you want a combined plenum flow, buy a single plane, 360 degree manifold! If you want to reap the advantages of a dual-plane, 180 degree technology. then you MUST retain the segregated dual plane plenum system!
So, what does this all mean?
You will have to make your own adapter.
(1): One way is to modify a 'cast aluminum' spacer, with Edelbrock's 8714/8715 divided wall adapter (made for dual plane manifolds). It has a full divider wall.
(2): Another way is to modify a High Velocity Heads 'billet' spacer for dual plane manifolds, but it has a cut-down divider wall.

The billet is probably a better material choice, but will require having the entire piece machined "flat" on both sides, once you fill-in the half-wall divider so as to retain plenum segregation.
ONE THING FOR SURE: You will have to insure that the divider wall is completely isolating the right hand barrels of the carb, from the left... all the way to the manifold's plenum interface (carb bolting interface). This can easily be done by any machine shop, but the heat from welding the 'full divider wall' in, WILL warp the spacer, making it necessary to have both surfaces machined flat again. This is IMPORTANT. Don't assume any of these spacers/adapters are flat!!!!!!!! They're not, and thus vacuum leaks!
For this reason alone, I suggest using the Edelbrock cast adapters, and porting them (as per Step 2 below).

So, Part 1 is done. You should now have a square bore spacer with a full divider wall between the right, and left carburetor barrels, (1" only, do NOT use 2" spacer for this part of the puzzle, as you are going to need yet another 1" spacer to finish the puzzle later).

No matter how you get to the proper square-bore adapter, you will need to 'flair-out' the bottom of the adapter, forcing the incoming air to blend into the huge parameters of the manifold's spread-bore interface. To simply dump your 1-11/16" carb barrels into a spread-bore footprint is wasting the potential of the spread-bor3e interface. It's old school, archaic, pain in the ***.... but use it! It will "ram air" your intake with at least 4-5 hp by just doing this alone!!! You don't 'flair' out the air flow, then you are forcing it to tabulate as it hits the bottom floor of the intake manifold, instead of being 'guided' outwards (not downwards).

Now for Step two:
1): Insure the 'top' side of the spacer aligns with the bottom of the carburetor barrels. MAKE SURE that the adapter's bores are the same as, or slightly smaller than the carb's bores. IF the adapter's bores are bigger than the carb bores, air flow will be all but destroyed as it tabulates around the edges of the adapter on the way down.
2): Get yourself a spread-bore carb gasket and match it to the performer RPM's intake flange. Trim gasket as necessary to the exact dimensions of the spread-bore's configuration on the manifold's mounting flange.
3): place the gasket on the 'Bottom' side of you adapter and mark with black marker. Now for the fun. Get an aluminum die grinding bit and start grinding softly, and slowly. What you want to do is blend the black line you've just drawn (on the bottom side), into the square-bore configuration (on the top side). So, angle your cutting tool towards the top of the adapter and just blend one side of the adapter, to the other. DO NOT touch the divider wall! Each side of your grinding will resemble a 'butterfly' wing.
Finish off the blending with a small (dremell) sanding drum to insure that the 'blend' is as soft & smooth as possible. Note that the actual surface of the metal (or any 'Intake' plenum) does NOT want to be smooth. It can be a bit rough to aide in air/gas atomization, whereas a smooth intake wall will hinder such. Exhaust plenums are just the opposite, whereas you want a smooth plenum.
INPORTANT: Keep the right and left sides of the adapter isolated (segregated) from each other. Don't allow your grinder to EVER go past the half-way point of the adapter (or up to the divider wall, and not beyond it).

Now you should end up with a square bore carb spacer with a divider wall (isolating the right, from the left carburetor barrels), and a blending of incoming air flow, from a 4-hole square bore source, to a spread-bore termination.

Step 3: Buy a GOOD Phenolic or wood 4-hole spacer (with bore sizes that match YOUR carburetor's bores) and fit stack it on 'TOP' of the square bore to spread-bore adapter you just built. You will end up with 1" of 4-hole down draft, terminating into a divided wall adapter into a spread-bore interface.
You now have the best of all worlds. The 4-hole spacer will accelerate downdraft (increasing lower end torque & responsiveness). This will also reduce the effects of flow reversion, and with the addition of the divided wall adapter, will all but eliminate any reversion incidents.

NOTE:
By NOT utilizing a 4-hole bottom adapter (the one you just built to interface with the spread bore manifold), but instead combining the primary & secondary bores (on each side, like the Edelbrock 8714/8715 design), you allow the down rushing airflow from the primaries (via a 4-hole plenum which will increase torque at mid RPM), to merge with the secondaries when they open up, thus adding responsiveness to the upper RPM ranges as well.

Good Luck... just don't buy some engineer's pipe dream. There's a good chance it will make your engine run like crap. Why would HVH (and Mondello who brags of inventing the dual plane) ever build a dual plane adapter, then take down the dividing wall. I've asked them on 3 occasions... they never returned an answer. Perhaps there is a rationale, but I’ve not figured it out, and they (HVH) won't tell us!!! Of course, you can forget ever getting a straight answer from Mondello! We’ve yanked out their pistons and rockers and went with Dick Miller and Crane! We will NEVER use a Mondello product again… even if it’s free!

capt will slee (ret)
purple heart veterans
activities coordinator
oldsmobile racing club
largo, fl 33778
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-13-2011, 03:13 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Newark Valley, NY
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Well it has been a while since I posted this. I had called Edelbrock tech support about the 2 hole dual plane adapters. They indicated that it would not provide any benefit. They said they offer them just for handling plumbing clearance issues. They recommended a 4 hole 1" adapter for my set-up. I purchased a phenelic one.

Turns out 1" is the most I can fit under the boats doghouse. While running it, it seemed to be peppier through the rpm range, but if there was wot improvement it was only in the 1ish range, which is in the noise and daily vareance. I did have some issues though. On a couple of evenings, the humidity and temperature was just right to cause icing. With the 1" phenelic spacer and vortec heads (no exhaust crossover) there was not enough heat being tansfered to carb.

A call to edelbrock confirmed that as a common issue, and they recommended that an aluminum one might be able to transfer enough heat. I have one to install for the upcoming boating season.

Anyway, thanks for the long response, and thought that it would be appropriate to update this thread.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2011, 05:40 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
response to dual plane

Seems reasonable that the gas/air mixture will suffer in cold environments. One should, I guess, assess their environmental conditions prior to isolating the carb via thermal insulators.

That being said, my main point in the "Dual Plane" dissertation, was that one should NOT allow the two isolated manifold planes (right & left sides), to merge. That's all. If you merge them, one may as well have a single plane (360 deg) manifold, thus allowing inversion (a demand if you will, of one intake valve stealing air from the back-seat of another intake valve beginning to open, and thus prohibiting an equalized intake flow. 360 deg manifolds have that inherent problem of allowing the intake valves to steal air from each other, instead of allowing a FULL breath of air throughout the piston's intake downstroke.

Think of this: One piston is rushing downwards producing max. vacuum, then another valve opens and trys to steal his share of air from the carb. Because the first piston's vacuum 'incident' is much higher than that of the piston's whose valve is 'just' starting to open, the first piston will in actuality produce a better air flow to the chamber than the other.

The isolation of a dual plane prohibits any two intake valves to be open at the same time. Thus the expression "Timed Intake" is commonly associated with dual plane manifolds. There is the issue of heat migration from the open intake valve up into the manifold as well, but it is a lesser problem than inversion.

Exhaust inversion works the same way, except in reverse. Exhaust inversion puts 'pressure' on the back-seat of another exhaust valve, instead of 'suction' on the back-seat of another intake valve.

So.... make sure you isolate the two sides of the dual plane manifold from EACH OTHER... some how. That's all. You can use any old 'open plenum' carb gasket, then cut up some gasket material strips and adhere them to manifold's center divider with 3M Aviation, Permatex Gasket maker #2, or Gasket-cinch (they're the only ones that are GAS impervious). Now you'll have a true 'divided plenum' gasket, and a TRUE divided plenum intake system. What a difference you will see in initial throttle response, over a single plane (undivided plenum).

pretty sick stuff when you get into it.

peace

PS... always use a gas-resistant sealant when affixing intake & carb gaskets! I like to Gasket-Cinch the bottom sides of gaskets to the top side of the manifold (assemble after allowing 15-min for GasgetCinch to 'completely' dry), then use Permatex #2 on the top side of the gaskets,a nd the underside of the carb, (wait only 5 min, then assemble with Permatex still 'slightly' wet). This allows for a rather clean separation of carb from manifold if disassembly if required, as it will tend to leave the gasket still adhered to the manifold. 5/16" carb bolts, and the the "4-corner" mounting interface... suck. The 5/16" torque value of 20-25# can't 'flatten-out' the center portions of the gasket/manifold). An 8-bolt arrangement would be MUCH better, as most carb flanges and manifolds are only within .007" - .010" flatness (over 12"), if you're lucky. Assuming .007" - .010" is one's gasket compression factor, one has barely enough gasket compression available to properly seal the intake.
Come on engineers!!!!!!!!!! Design a better carb interface!!!
I use Quick Fuel Technology (QFT) carbs on all our Olds engines, and as good as they are, the same old 5/16" x 4-bolt mounting interface sucks!
A neat trick is to make 2 1/8" strips that will bolt to two of the sides (I've found that the sides work better, as then the carb with be 'pinched' downwards by it's sides, helping to better seal the center divider (especially when you've gone and built the gasket divider mentioned above)

STOP ALL WARS NOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

CAPT WILL SLEE (RET)
PURPLE HEART VETERANS
OLDSMOBILE RACING CLUB
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2011, 06:37 AM
cobalt327's Avatar
WFO
 
Last wiki edit: Intake manifold
Last journal entry: 1980 Malibu Wagon
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Atlanta
Age: 60
Posts: 5,037
Wiki Edits: 1616

Thanks: 128
Thanked 597 Times in 546 Posts
It's not like you cannot buy a divided spacer:

Edelbrock P/N 8725

A couple I made:


SHAPED TO FIT THE PONTIAC PERFORMER INTAKE



Briefly, there's no reason a 4-hole spacer cannot be used to keep the plenum divided/isolated from one side to the other. The 4-hole spacer will tend to aid velocity, the divided-but-open (front to back) spacer will not have as much effect on velocity and an open, undivided spacer even less so. These all can be tuning aids- depending on things like the carb size, the intake height, plenum volume, etc. and what's desired performance-wise, like more top end, more bottom end, wider power band, etc.

Also, there ARE cases where a gap or notch in the plenum divider (like seen on the RPM Air-Gap and some GM factory intakes) WILL help output. It is not a simple cut and dried case of do or do not allow 'communication' between the sides of a divided plenum intake. Instead, this has to be tested on a case by case basis.

Until recently, there was a video test done called "SUCK-SQUEEZE-BANG-BLOW" that showed what the difference was between a solid and a notched plenum divider. It seems to have gone missing, perhaps someone else has a link to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2011, 10:27 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Also, there ARE cases where a gap or notch in the plenum divider (like seen on the RPM Air-Gap and some GM factory intakes) WILL help output. It is not a simple cut and dried case of do or do not allow 'communication' between the sides of a divided plenum intake. Instead, this has to be tested on a case by case basis.

Until recently, there was a video test done called "SUCK-SQUEEZE-BANG-BLOW" that showed what the difference was between a solid and a notched plenum divider. It seems to have gone missing, perhaps someone else has a link to it.[/QUOTE]

That is one interresting carb spacer! It will work fine for isolating the dual-planes. Any 4-hole will do that task just fine. I personally like the "Open-Divided" as opposed to the 4-hole (like pictured). I like the secondaries to blend immediately. But whatever. That adapter looked as someone filled in one of the spread-bore's original plenum outlines??? Strange.

But it (your spacer/adapter pictured), will blend primaries & secondaries immediately, isolate the dual-plenums, and act as a thermal barrier as well. What more can a carb adapter do!
The issue I had when i posted, was the fact that I had a spread-bore Performer RPM manifold. Bummer! But, in that I had all that open, fully divided plenum, why not 'fair', or port-out the manifold-side of the spacer to meet the dimensions & configuration of the sp[read-bore intake? If one uses a 1" adapter, then that's one full inch one has to blend out the vertical velocity of the fuel/air mixture, so as to fill the manifold more completely... and more quickly. The tops of these manifolds are "dead space". Best to get the fuel/air flow down and deep (to the opening valves) as easily as possible. Nothing does this better than gravity.

Yes, this is the interresting quandry with 180-degree dual planes. I could see how a 'notch' in the plenum divider would help balance out detonation due to a more equalized fuel/air flow to EACH cylinder. Sort of like balancing dual carbs on older Harleys & VWs via a balancing tube between the intake runners. I guess one must assume the their engine is pretty balanced as far as piston comp, port flow, etc. elsewise, one relatively stronger or weaker cylinder may have a more dramatic effect on the other 7 when using a truly isolated 180-degree dual plane.

Dual-Plane technology, it must be remembered, is a product of the 180 degree manifold, not the 180-deg technology a product of "dual-plane" manifold. 180-degree demands that only one intake valve will open at a time. To acheive this, the manifold was simply broken into two halfs. In each of these two halves, the intake runners feed four intake valves (and cylinders), and thus satisfying 180 degrees of the firing order.

The only real advantage I can really see, is the 180s ability to reduce, and perhaps even eliminate, reversion.
I would have to say though, that if one is to use a 180-deg manifold, he BETTER have a very good scavaging system (exhaust valves, headers) so as to get as much heated pressure and associative burnt gasses out of the combustion chamber BEFORE the intake opens and starts pressurizing & heating the intake, creating an 'over-flooding' of sorts, within the intake manifold, as there is no other intake valves open at the time to help with reversion.
Filling exhaust crossovers in heads does this same thing to tone-down exhaust reversion. If one ever wanted to know why exhaust cam durations are usually longer than the intakes', its mostly anti-reversion.

I welded up the HVH "Divided Plenum" 1" carb spacer, and ported it to fit the Performer RPM Spread-Bore mounting interface. Should allow fuel to fill the runners pretty smoothly, without much low pressure turbulances. We'll see. I might end up yanking the carb and cutting open the plenum divider (like it was!) to get this ole' Olds to run, who knows!

peace

will
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 04-06-2011, 12:46 PM
malc's Avatar
Living At The Speed Of Life
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: España Right Coast
Posts: 3,287
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 105
Thanked 129 Times in 106 Posts
Until recently, there was a video test done called "SUCK-SQUEEZE-BANG-BLOW" that showed what the difference was between a solid and a notched plenum divider. It seems to have gone missing, perhaps someone else has a link to it.

Here it is.

I´ve said this before, I run two inch open spacer on an Airgap (not RPM) and it works just great. The four holer I tried before was a dud on idle, the open cured that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 04-07-2011, 02:13 AM
cobalt327's Avatar
WFO
 
Last wiki edit: Intake manifold
Last journal entry: 1980 Malibu Wagon
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Atlanta
Age: 60
Posts: 5,037
Wiki Edits: 1616

Thanks: 128
Thanked 597 Times in 546 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by will slee
That is one interresting carb spacer! It will work fine for isolating the dual-planes. Any 4-hole will do that task just fine. I personally like the "Open-Divided" as opposed to the 4-hole (like pictured). I like the secondaries to blend immediately. But whatever. That adapter looked as someone filled in one of the spread-bore's original plenum outlines??? Strange.
The top and bottom right spacers are the same one. The correct orientation of the spacer (not adapter ) is depicted in the bottom right photo. The 3/32" 4-hole plate goes against the carb throttle plate which immediately opens up into what is seen in the top (upside down) photo.

I made it this way (width opened fully on the smaller "shallower" side of the intake and not opened fully on the other side) to increase- while somewhat equalizing- the plenum volumes of a Pontiac Performer. That's why the one side wasn't sculpted to the intake carb flange- I was looking to not add any more volume than necessary, as this was on the "deep", larger volume side of the intake.

Because the depth of the intake was lacking, and I was using a small (at least by most Pontiac standards) 650 4777 carb, I had more mixture velocity than I had intake depth/plenum volume to get it turned into the runners- thus the tall-ish, open front-to-back spacer you see.

The bottom left spacer was opened up fully to match the intake flange (shown below) and wasn't used.

PERFORMER ON LEFT, RPM ON RIGHT


Unfortunately, the Pontiac RPM intake had yet to be introduced at the time I did these spacers.

I would imagine a book could be written on spacers. It seems that regarding spacers there are more exceptions to the rules than most things, and I suppose that's why I tend to shy away from advising any particular spacer unless the combination has obvious 'needs'.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 04-26-2011, 08:11 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Great info ! Thanks , I've been looking for this information. Just ordered an 8714 to modify for my edelbrock 2115 Cadillac 500 intake.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 04-30-2011, 07:13 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
so...i got my 8714 spacer yesterday and decided today was the day to fit it and grind it as explained above. well it seems to cover well on the edelbrock 2115 intake , however when i put it against the carb base it does not cover it all. it is a holley 750 dbl pump vac secondaries. will i have to use a plate ? square bore to spreadbore adapter ? i assumed i wouldnt need it with this spacer. thanks for any input you can give.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 05-01-2011, 07:34 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
adapter alignment

Quote:
Originally Posted by sidejobs
so...i got my 8714 spacer yesterday and decided today was the day to fit it and grind it as explained above. well it seems to cover well on the edelbrock 2115 intake , however when i put it against the carb base it does not cover it all. it is a holley 750 dbl pump vac secondaries. will i have to use a plate ? square bore to spread-bore adapter ? i assumed i wouldn't need it with this spacer. thanks for any input you can give.
by... "the carb base it does not cover it all", what exactly do you mean? All one really cares about is:

1): When the spacer is aligned with the carb, are ALL carb butterflies are free to open - completely?

2): When the spacer is aligned with the Manifold, are the spacer ports (openings) the same as OR smaller than the manifold opening, (or Ports)?

3): All 4 mounting bolts line up?

Do you have these 3 issues covered?

"Fairing-out" the 'bottom' of square-bore spacer, to better 'blend' with the 'top' of the spread-bore manifold, is NOT all that important, and (even though I do it) is a bit anal.... so long as the the spacer opening is NOT larger than the manifold opening (and thus creating a 'shelf' on which the incoming air will slam against, instead of flowing freely towards the bottom of the manifold and into the intake ports of the heads.

For all practical purposes, any available "divided" spacer will work OK, so long as the dividing wall IS NOT WIDER than the dividing walls of the carb venturies (again... air will slam against the thicker wall of the spacer, creating a flow-obstruction).

What you want to make sure of, is that the spacer 'ports' are the right size for you carb's butterflies. Obviously, a 1-11/16" carb butterfly WILL NOT fully open in a spacer with 1-5/8" ports!!!!!! (or whatever size, you get the picture).

As long as all the spacer doesn't hinder the butterflies from opening freely (on the carb side), and the gasket doesn't hinder the butterflies from opening freely either, you should be good to go.


peace

will's pretty-good oldsmobiles
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 05-05-2011, 06:58 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: florida
Posts: 4
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Divided spacer fits manifold fine, the spacer openings are smaller than manifold. The spacer openings fit well with the butterflies , however the spacer does not cover the carbed base plate well enough , there is about a 1/4" section at the rear that would be a huge vacuum leak. I will post a pic when I arrive home next week. Thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Engine posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
single plane vs dual plane blackrider71 Engine 12 03-02-2010 08:19 PM
Carb gasket dual plane intake to 4 BBL D. Newland Engine 3 09-26-2008 04:36 PM
Need help with Edelbrock carb Crazy-J Engine 1 06-01-2005 02:24 PM
Carb spacer question Gametech Engine 5 05-21-2005 10:04 PM
Poppity-pop w/new carb spacer 345coupe Engine 0 05-09-2004 03:57 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.