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Old 07-24-2005, 10:07 AM
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"E-Coat" and Por-15

I have used Por-15 extensively on several of my prior projects and have been very happy with the durability and toughness of their products. I have now purchased a set of new front fenders for my '53 F-100. These fenders are coated in the standard "e-coat" black finish. I plan on covering the inside of these fenders with Por-15 and then a shot of rubberized undercoating. How do you think the Por-15 will adhere to a scuffed up e-coat on the inner fenders. The easy answer is to strip it down to bare metal but there are several nooks and crannies that would be real hard to get into.

Thanks in advance for your advice.
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Old 07-24-2005, 11:46 AM
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According to POR you have two choices on those new fenders.

One is sand blast and spray POR.
Two is sand off E-COAT and dip in water and let set a few days to RUST real good and than spray POR. (my favorite)

POR will not stick to waterborne or regular E-COAT.

Instead of destroying two new fenders you would get far better protection spraying undercoat over the E-COAT.

Although a professional shop at this point would scuff the E-COAT and paint.

Whoever engineered the E-COAT setup at the factory you bought the fenders from, most likely took great pains in setting up a 3-4 acid dip and rinse process and spent a great amount of time figuring out the mil thickness of the e-coat for maximum rust protection. So why re-engineer it?
I know I need pills!
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Old 07-24-2005, 04:08 PM
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Thanks for your advice Barry. Do you recommend scuffing the e-coat before shooting the undercoat on it?

Also, what undercoat do you recommend.

Thanks again for your help.
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Old 07-24-2005, 06:14 PM
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No need to scuff for applying undercoating.
Wash with wax and grease remover is good enough.

Only difference in undercoating is the amount of butyl rubber added to the asphalt. The more butyl rubber the better the grade.
3M, Transtar, USC, Norton all have good grades and most offer 2-3 grades, spend the extra $2 and get the best grade.
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Old 07-24-2005, 06:52 PM
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Interesting topic.

Barry, ever tried topcoating over e-coat with your epoxy primer (or anyone else's epoxy primer)? Just curious whether that would work or not.

I know we topcoat e-coat with powder almost routinely, but then powder's powder and 2K epoxy is certainly an altogether different product. Could be that bake temperatures help us strike in a bit with powder, but on the other hand one might argue that the solvents in a 2K epoxy might soften up the e-coat a tad.

I've just never tried this and am curious how it would work. Any thoughts?
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Old 07-24-2005, 06:54 PM
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i have epoxyed over e coat with no problems, mike.
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Old 07-25-2005, 04:13 AM
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Double post.

Last edited by BarryK; 07-25-2005 at 04:19 AM.
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Old 07-25-2005, 04:17 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powderbill
Interesting topic.

Barry, ever tried topcoating over e-coat with your epoxy primer (or anyone else's epoxy primer)? Just curious whether that would work or not.

I know we topcoat e-coat with powder almost routinely, but then powder's powder and 2K epoxy is certainly an altogether different product. Could be that bake temperatures help us strike in a bit with powder, but on the other hand one might argue that the solvents in a 2K epoxy might soften up the e-coat a tad.

I've just never tried this and am curious how it would work. Any thoughts?
**********************************************

Most of the better made epoxy stick pretty good to unsanded E-Coats.

I don't think any manufacturer recommends the spraying of epoxy over unsanded E-Coat, all error on the safe side of course.

Where the real concern is unsanded waterborne E-Coat, as there would be no softening of the E-Coat.
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Old 07-25-2005, 07:22 AM
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Sikkens, Dupont, and PPG all have sealers suggested for use over unsanded E-coat. Some of the area shops have been using this proceedure for years. Personally I wouldn't put anything over unsanded E-coat. For the amount of time it takes to scuff the surface it really isn't worth taking a risk. On the replacement fenders- I'd scuff them down spray two good coats of epoxy then paint and/or rustproof the interior. The epoxy will provide extra corrosion protection should the paint or rustproofing fail. Also if you scuff and apply epoxy over the whole fender this will give you the ideal base for any filler work and also primer surfacer. Keep the POR for rusty areas IMO. The fenders should last a few lifetimes if well cared for. Bob
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Old 07-25-2005, 09:06 AM
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There are a number of 2K sealers out there made to go over unsanded E-Coat.

I agree with you, how much time does it take to scuff a new fender with a grey or red scotch pad.
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Old 07-25-2005, 11:35 AM
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It took me 2 hour's start to finish on a tailgate.
Dissasemble,wax & grease remover,scuff,wash,dry.
Production work ain't my bag.
I used Nason Select 2K primer,beige,for blocking out the slight imperfections and shot 2 coats white Chromabase. 2 Coats 3:1 clear.

Man do I LOVE my LPH-400 Iwata.
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Old 07-25-2005, 11:56 AM
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I agree on the LPH-400, the more I use it the more impressed I get, definately hit a new sweet spot with gun adjustment yesterday.
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Old 07-25-2005, 07:49 PM
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Care to share Bob?
I'm still getting a little 'peel. This gun transfers so good that I'm afraid to open it up too much. I sagged the Ford emblem oval depression a "little" with it Sun. not bad, but more work.
This was at 2 3/4 fluid,20# at the gun reg. and fan wide open approx. 6-7" out.
Still on the learning curve.
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