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Old 04-15-2006, 01:38 AM
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Electric Fan and thermostat

I just bought a 66 mustang coupe. The previous owner put an electric fan in but the way he has it setup is crazy. You have to have the radio on for the fan to be on. The guy said he was planning on hooking it up with a thermostat so that it wouldn't be dependant on the radio but the temp. I was wondering if anybody knew how to go about this?

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Old 04-15-2006, 01:42 AM
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You need a power relay for the fan that is triggered off the ignition switch "run only" position. Don't forget the thermostat and an appropriate self reseting fuse. A good 10 gauge wire to the fan too.

Personally I think you would be better off with a factory type fan clutch and shroud.
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Old 04-15-2006, 01:49 AM
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xntrik
what about hooking the fan and thermostat up directly to the battery so it runs only when it needs too, whether the car is on or not?
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Old 04-15-2006, 01:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solidus
xntrik
what about hooking the fan and thermostat up directly to the battery so it runs only when it needs too, whether the car is on or not?
YA that is what I said, but you must do it with a relay so the key turns it off as well as the temperature. I don't think you really want it running when the key is off and the radiator gets heat soaked, do you?

If you do, I would wire in a mid 80s Dodge Omni 10 minute cycle relay so the fan will run after you turn off the key. They did this to prevent vapor lock on the carb cars.
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Old 04-15-2006, 02:08 AM
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Sorry, this is my first time fixing up a car and i know very little. Thank you very much for your replys by the way
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Old 04-15-2006, 02:46 AM
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Doc here,

Get a proper size relay for your fan draw..

Hook the Coil power from the relay to a 12 Volt switched source (ignition) Via a 3 amp fuse.

ext hook the Ground side of the Relay to the Temperature Sender switch..

Hook the Normally open Contact Via a 10 gauge wire to a Proper sized fuse link to any "Hot At All Times" Terminal.

Hook the Center wiper to the Fan motor Via a 10 gauge wire..



Here is what the relay should wire up like..

The function turns on the coil of the relay when the key is on..

It in turn senses a certain resistance to ground from the sender switch..when hot enough, it has a ground that fires the relay, closes the contacts and turns the fan on..

As the temps decline, the switch has a high or no resistance to ground, and the relay de~energizes..shutting the fan off.

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Old 04-15-2006, 10:04 AM
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Doc's would definitely be the cheapest route and work fine. But if you want to get everything you need in one package and would like an adjustable on-off feature, spend $40 for Derale's (Part No. 16749). I like it because the sensor is threaded and not one of those bulb type.



Best of luck, Ed www.edgesz28.com
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Old 04-15-2006, 10:16 AM
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Solidus, sorry, I didn't mean to sound condescending.
I guess some of this stuff seems awfully elementary to me after all these years. I have to remember that if people already knew the simple answer they would not be asking the question.
I will always be glad to help if I can.

Doc and Edge = good info, thanks.

Last edited by xntrik; 04-15-2006 at 10:29 AM.
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Old 04-15-2006, 10:34 AM
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In addition to the circuit breaker you should also put an LED light , that wait you now that you are getting power to the fan and not worried wether is working or not or overheating `cause the fan did`nt turn on.
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Old 04-15-2006, 10:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mvara71
In addition to the circuit breaker you should also put an LED light , that wait you now that you are getting power to the fan and not worried wether is working or not or overheating `cause the fan did`nt turn on.

Yes, good idea.
You could also wire the LED as a "fan failure" light that only comes on when the fan isn't running but should be.
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