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Mr.NutCase 12-17-2005 06:52 PM

Electrical tools
 
What tools would you recommend for electrical troubleshooting?

Rob Keller 12-17-2005 07:02 PM

THIS

http://www.powerprobe.com/powerprobeproduct.html


http://www.powerprobe.com/powerprobe_2.html


http://www.powerprobe.com/
SR66 :thumbup:

TechnTool 12-17-2005 08:41 PM

Since you asked:
http://www.aktoolsandequipment.com/i...D&ProdID=26880
This isa basic meter, good for automotive work, low priced but safe for PCM testing.

sha_ba_do_bang 12-17-2005 09:07 PM

I'll second the power probe and a multimeter, you can do 95% of modern auto electric trouble shooting. 100% of old rods and classics.

Fast Orange 12-18-2005 03:36 PM

The Power Probe and a multimeter are a good start,but if you want to save a few bucks,instead of the PP,get a 12V test light and some jumper leads with alligator clips.Don't get me wrong-the PP is a great tool,but you can do much the same with a test light,and do it quicker.

George :cool:

oldschoolrods 12-18-2005 03:44 PM

Get a good name brand test light (craftsman at minimum) the cheap ones have little cords that dont reach anywhere :mad:

steve t 12-18-2005 04:24 PM

a test light is a must, i don't know how i would keep my car running with out one

PrimeMover 12-18-2005 05:03 PM

Since I do a lot of higher voltage work, I'm used to using a Fluke digital multimeter. I't good for just about everything that has to do with the ride too. As far as a 12 volt test probe goes, I've had best luck with Mac stuff. Working under-dash on my old Chevy, I don't know what I'd do without my Mac 'headlight' either.. It shines where ever I've got my head pointed and allows me to keep both hands on the job and actually see what I'm doing at the same time. I can live with the messed up hair. :D

Mr.NutCase 12-19-2005 04:15 PM

I have a Craftman multimeter, needs new test leads( Its my fault, I cut them, but I hope Crazy Glue works)but Sears no longer makes them. I was wondering is the actronIII meter #CP7665 is good?
Costs at $30 Pepboys, or should I buy Craftsman multimeter.

1931 steve 12-19-2005 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fast Orange
The Power Probe and a multimeter are a good start,but if you want to save a few bucks,instead of the PP,get a 12V test light and some jumper leads with alligator clips.Don't get me wrong-the PP is a great tool,but you can do much the same with a test light,and do it quicker.

George :cool:

I disagree with you Fast Orange, IMHO nothing beats the Power Probe, all you have is two hook ups positive and negative side of battery.Then in the palm of your hand you have power and ground by a push of a button and an second ground to power up motors and such, no way a test light and jumper leads can be as fast. I use my PP in place of my test light every time. I would also recommend the Fluke multi meter. Just my 2 cents

Steve :welcome:

Fast Orange 12-19-2005 05:38 PM

I've got a PPII,and while I value it as a troubleshooting tool,I grab a regular test light first.By the time you get the PP hooked up and run the cable to the fusebox,you can be checking fuses,checking power etc. with the testlight.When things get more involved,the PP comes out.For locating shorts,finding broken wires and more in depth troubleshooting,the PP is a great tool.
In Mr. Nutcases case,he is pretty young,has very limited funds and is just begining to learn automotive electrics.For him to get a PP without the knowledge and experience to use it properly could cause him more problems than it would solve.The best way to learn how to troubleshoot electrical problems is to stick with basic tools and learn the basics.As one gains knowledge and experience,more sophisticated equipment becomes worthwhile.

George :cool:

Mr.NutCase 12-19-2005 05:44 PM

In January, in my Autoshop class teacher will teach us electrical, right now were are in Tires

Rob Keller 12-19-2005 05:58 PM

IMO the power probe kicks arse
*test light with a 20' cord
*& another 20' extension cord for a total of 40'+
*positive and negative polarity at the flip of a switch
*continuity tester
*2 LED headlights to see what im doing
*sound to tell me which way or what its doing
*built in circuit breaker
* flashing red orange or green light to indicate polarity and alternating current
**and a accessory to send a radio wave down a wire to use with a receiver to find broken wires without even looking or touching them(this I dont have yet)


+no jumper wires needed
+check truck & trailer from one spot
+not wondering if its grounded
+able to power up a window or a seat with out a bunch of crap
+battery or cig lighter powered

think about it on the simplest thing a 1157 light bulb & socket in the time it takes to locate a jumper wire and hook it up ive already tested the bulb and socket and ready to go back tracking up the system

I bought it because my wifes brake light went out and the reverse were out too and could NOT find the cause all circuits were clear it wound up being a wire that went to the A/C & a transmission plug on the same circuit (all factory) that was never hooked up?? found the problem in less than 2 hours badda bing it paid for its self Vs. taking it to a shop


SR66 :thumbup:

Rob Keller 12-19-2005 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fast Orange
For him to get a PP without the knowledge and experience to use it properly could cause him more problems than it would solve.

George :cool:


I have to disagree there I think about the time I have wasted in my life just on looking for a problem for a long time to find out I got a bad ground...ON MY TEST LIGHT!!!! :pain: :pain:

if its a quick" dose it have power?" or "test a fuse"

test light = walking Vs. power probe= NHRA

no comparison to a young serious tech planning on doing this for more than once its worth the $120

SR66 :thumbup:

PrimeMover 12-19-2005 07:53 PM

[QUOTE=Rob Keller]I think about the time I have wasted in my life just on looking for a problem for a long time to find out I got a bad ground...ON MY TEST LIGHT!!!! :pain: :pain:

QUOTE]

What you said... Cheap test lights really can waste a lot of time. Even the good ones can let you down if you put your unconditional trust in 'em.. I always check the dern things on a known voltage source first before I take a no-light situation for granted. :)


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