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Old 10-27-2011, 01:57 PM
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end mill advise needed

http://www.busybeetools.com/products...2-HP-220V.html
hey guys I bought this milling machine few months back and looking now to buy some end mills can someone tell me what to shop for that fits my model?

http://www.busybeetools.com/products...ED-METRIC.html

do those work?

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Old 10-27-2011, 04:45 PM
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That end mill kit will work. Make sure the chuck is the proper size for the mill bits as they very in size depending on the bit you need to use. Another place to look that is abundant in machining tools is McMaster-Carr. Good Luck!

-Chris
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Old 10-27-2011, 04:45 PM
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I have used a similar, but larger machine, since the mid seventies. Very handy for small projects. You will need an R-8 adapter for any tooling. If you get a adapters for 1/4" - 3/8" - 1/2" end mills. These will get you going. A mill/drill type chuck is available (looks like a small lathe chuck) but won't hold end mills well on heavy cuts..

You will find out that tooling will add up $$$$. I have many thousands over the years. Enco.com or Ebay tooling lots are ways to cut expenses. 5-7 years ago this stuff was going for scrap..or shipped overseas..
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Old 10-27-2011, 04:47 PM
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I'm no machinist, or millwright, but I get to play with a Bridgeport knock-off at work from time to time.
I'm not certain, but I think its best to use a collet to hold your endmills. Thats probably common knowledge, but at work I see allot of guys just use the drill chuck to hold them for convenience. I think the side loads play hell on a chuck.
If it were mine I'd invest in a set of collets. I think your spindle is listed as having an R8 taper. I'd check your owners manual for exactly what collets your mill needs if you don't already have them.
I've had good luck with the Tin coated endmills as far as lasting longer, but I'm not sure if you can get them resharpened the same as HSS mills.
Hopefully someone that knows what their talking about will chime in.
ssmonty
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Old 10-27-2011, 04:47 PM
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I got about 20 r8 collers so I am ok there in regards to having different sizes of endmills etc
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Old 10-27-2011, 05:26 PM
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Mill

Quote:
Originally Posted by jss
http://www.busybeetools.com/products...2-HP-220V.html
hey guys I bought this milling machine few months back and looking now to buy some end mills can someone tell me what to shop for that fits my model?

http://www.busybeetools.com/products...ED-METRIC.html

do those work?
It says it takes a 3/4 end mill, I think 1/2 would be big enough.

Bob
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Old 10-27-2011, 08:14 PM
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Make sure your collets are compatible with the drawbar thread.
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Old 10-28-2011, 09:17 AM
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I watch Ebay for end mills and I have a bought most of mine there for ridiculously low prices. If you need a specific size and need it in a hurry then shopping Ebay may not always yield bargains but just making low bids on sizes you normally use will often result in surprising bargains, I only bid on well known brands and never buy Chinese junk, those things are a waste of money! I just recently bought 4 new OSG 5/8" TiN 4 flute end mills for $21 and change including shipping, that was over $100 worth of tooling. Not long ago I bought a new Niagara 1" roughing mill (hog mill) for $12 including shipping, that thing lists for over $150! I would not buy those sets you listed, I tried the Chinese stuff and it is such poor quality it is not worth it. Buying Chinese end mills is worse than buying Chinese drill bits and they will dull so fast you will go though them in a hurry. A good quality end mill is like a good quality drill bit and is worth the cost if you take care of them.
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:51 PM
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I didn't stay at Holiday Inn last night, but I am a machinist.

Don't waste your money on that set. It's more end mills than you'll ever need, there are some in the set that are too large for your mill and they are metric which drives up the price.

You need to decide what type of material you intend to cut. Four flute end mills are best for steel and two flute end mills work best on non ferrous metals and plastics. Once you figure that out, go to MSC, McMaster Carr or Travers and buy a couple each of 1/8", 1/4" 3/8" and 1/2" double end end mills. Good American made end mills will cost $10 to $15 each and are well worth the money over imports. Your mill is likely not rigid enough to use anything larger than 1/2" so that will keep the cost down.

Before you use them, learn how to calculate the proper RPM so you don't burn them up. Basically, you take the cutting speed of whatever material you are working with, multiply by 4 and divide by the diameter of the end mill. The cutting speed of low carbon steel is about 80 and aluminum or brass is 250, that's in surface feet per minute. For instance, the approximate RPM for a 1/2" end mill cutting steel would be 4 x 80 /.5 = 640 RPM. The same end mill in aluminum would turn at 2000 RPM.

Also, if your machine didn't come with collets you'll need a 3/8" and a 1/2" R8 collet to hold the aforementioned end mills.

Have fun,

Tom

Last edited by Figbash; 10-28-2011 at 01:10 PM.
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Old 10-28-2011, 12:58 PM
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The TIN coated end mils work pretty well for most stuff. Be aware of feeds and speeds. Too much of either will quickly dull the endmill anyway and make it worthless. I have a number of these with lots of chips under them.

I also have a 1/4, 3/8, 1/2, and a 3/4 inch 4 flute center cutting carbide end mills that only I use. Most don't even know I have them. These work good on about everything automotive. I also have a couple carbide drills that I use to fix broken taps and drills. I charge double to use these....once for the repair and once for penalty for breaking the tool in the first place. haha I'm serious I really do and some hate me.

By the way nice machine choice too!!!
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Old 10-28-2011, 03:33 PM
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thanks for the input guys I have about 20 different R8 collets so I am ok there

my biggest problem is that I am new to milling work so I really dont know what are the good brands to look for and what common basic sizes I need. I am working on doing more and more reading on this stuff . but I take ur advise and just get the usa versions of endmills.

do keep in mine the machine is just to make fun custom gear for my cars not for business use etc

also wanted to add I was just at the msc site and i see these brands come up

Accupro (8) | Cleveland (4) | Hertel (10) | Interstate (24) | Made in USA (2) | Value (4)

any idea which are from north america vs asia?

Last edited by jss; 10-28-2011 at 03:42 PM.
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Old 10-28-2011, 04:40 PM
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Interstate and Accupro make primarily or exclusively carbide end mills and you don't need those. Cleveland and Hertel are good brands that I assume are (or at least used to be) USA made. McMaster Carr sells Niagara brand which is an excellent value for the money.

Look for double end high speed steel end mills, either two or four flute. Aren't worth the money in your case. You'll likely break them before you wear them out. No offense, it's just part of the learning experience.

Tom
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Old 10-28-2011, 05:03 PM
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end mills

Quote:
Originally Posted by Figbash
Interstate and Accupro make primarily or exclusively carbide end mills and you don't need those. Cleveland and Hertel are good brands that I assume are (or at least used to be) USA made. McMaster Carr sells Niagara brand which is an excellent value for the money.

Look for double end high speed steel end mills, either two or four flute. Aren't worth the money in your case. You'll likely break them before you wear them out. No offense, it's just part of the learning experience.

Tom
The hardest thing on end mills or drills is Rpm and how fast you feed, you force feed you will break them. also if you use the formula that was given before you will be just fine, but if you try to go too fast that will end up in a bunch of broken metal.

I think that the guys that say not to use carbide are wrong. Once you get use to using your machine know the speeds and feeds, you can switch to carbide and they will last forever. That is all I have, you can make thousands of parts before you have to resharpen them, But there again you have to get your speeds and feeds right. Get a book on the different metals, the surface feeds they should be run at, and the feeds you should run your material. like .002 feed or .015 just feed it right that will also give you the best finish.

If you are not sure what you have run at a reduced surface feed, to be safe,
Just because it's S/S doesn't mean they are all run at the same surface feed. Surface feed for 303 SS is 150, surface feed for 304 SS is 90. you have to know what you are running.

Bob
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Old 10-28-2011, 06:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
I think that the guys that say not to use carbide are wrong. Once you get use to using your machine know the speeds and feeds, you can switch to carbide and they will last forever. Bob


I have and use carbide mills a lot and I agree that the statement not to use them is bad advice, it would be much better to say not to use them until the operator is experienced enough to understand how to properly use them. Carbide mills are expensive and VERY unforgiving, easily becoming just a chipped piece of (expensive) scrap if used to learn with. Maybe the first few hours should be used practicing with the Chinese junk HSS mills then after learning the basics switch to good quality tooling. As far as carbide being expensive I have found that properly used it can actually be cheaper in the long run but as I said before very unforgiving and will not tolerate mistakes or abuse.
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Old 10-28-2011, 06:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 35terraplane
The hardest thing on end mills or drills is Rpm and how fast you feed, you force feed you will break them. also if you use the formula that was given before you will be just fine, but if you try to go too fast that will end up in a bunch of broken metal.

I think that the guys that say not to use carbide are wrong. Once you get use to using your machine know the speeds and feeds, you can switch to carbide and they will last forever. That is all I have, you can make thousands of parts before you have to resharpen them, But there again you have to get your speeds and feeds right. Get a book on the different metals, the surface feeds they should be run at, and the feeds you should run your material. like .002 feed or .015 just feed it right that will also give you the best finish.

If you are not sure what you have run at a reduced surface feed, to be safe,
Just because it's S/S doesn't mean they are all run at the same surface feed. Surface feed for 303 SS is 150, surface feed for 304 SS is 90. you have to know what you are running.

Bob
Bob,

Carbide definitely has its place. When machining tough materials like tool steel or stainless or for a large number of parts, carbide tooling is definitely worthwhile. But for a neophyte machinist like the OP, working with a bench mill, carbide is not a good choice. It is more expensive, extremely brittle and therefore much less forgiving than high speed steel. The first time he bumps a workpiece too hard or the tool grabs, or it gets dropped on the floor, it's going to chip or break. Also, carbide is not the best choice for aluminum without using coolant as a lubricant, it will load up much more readily than high speed steel. I do prototype machining for a living and have both carbide and high speed steel tooling on hand, but for the most part, HHS is my tool of choice.

Tom
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