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Old 10-08-2008, 06:47 PM
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Engine paint, high temp paint, Powerder coating???

Hello everyone I just have a few paint questions for you all.

First off my main question:

I'm wanting to clean up and paint my 350 that I'll be using for a v8 convertible beetle while I have it out. Is there any engine paint that's better than others??? I'm wanting to go either black or silver (wife hasn't made up her mind yet) This isn't going to be a show car, just a toy, but I'd like it to look fairly nice for a while. Is the spray can engine paint at auto zone fine to use, or will it flake and fall off after a little while. Would there be something at a automotive paint store that would be better, or something I should order?? I have spray guns so it doesn't have to be spray paint.


Also I work as an industrial mechanic in an aluminium foundry, so I have access to our heat treat ovens, and other ovens. I could potentually use these for doing bake on high temp paints, or maybe they'd work with powerder coating???

Here's what I have access to:
High temp heat treat is out of the question 985F for 10 hours then they have 10-15 secs to pull the basket and quench it.

I could put parts in a low temp heat treat oven for up to 10 hours at 320F

I could also use mold prep or core ovens that can be set up to 650F for any lenght of time, and maybe a couple that would go up to 800.

What kind of high temp and durable paints are out there need to be cured?? Maybe something to use on headers, oil pans, brakets???

How about powerder coating??? What kind of temps would I need for that and how long would it need to cook???? I could pick up a cheap powerdercoat gun from harbor fright for ~$70.00 and poweder coat all the brakets, oil pans, and probably a lot of other stuff and It would all be real durable???


Thanks for any ideas or help you guys might have....


Talk to you all later


bye

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Old 10-08-2008, 07:37 PM
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I use base coat clear coat

I used Martin Seinor (NAPA) base coat clear coat on my engine block and heads. I cleaned it up very well and used a metal etching primer, then sprayed it with base coat with two coats of clear over that. It is a Chevy LT1 cast iron block with aluminum heads. I have over 6000 miles on it and the paint looks great.

I have also done engines with rattle cans and the high temp spray cans worked well. It is not a glossy a coating, but it holds up well.

I also blasted an aluminum intake and sprayed clear directly over that. It is holding up well so far with about 3000 miles and two years on it.

The trick is to degrease it properly.

I have no experience with powder coating.

Good luck.
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Old 10-08-2008, 07:38 PM
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I have not been pleased with the durability of any of the rattle can engine paints, and that includes the highly touted VHT and Duplicolor. What I did find that has worked very well for me is single stage catalyzed automotive paint. That paint is far more durable than anything that comes out of a rattle can. Engine paint does not necessarily have to be high temp. If your engine gets hot enough that it needs high temp paint you have other problems IMHO.

Vince
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Old 10-09-2008, 03:54 AM
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Powder coating is 325-350 degrees for 20 mins. But if you are a novice at it, I suggest going to someone who knows how. There's more to it than just spraying powder and putting it in an oven.
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Old 08-19-2009, 11:58 AM
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I used plasti kote engine enamel in the a regular spray can. You should be able to get at almost every auto parts store. I put 2 coats of engine primer on, then 4 coats of chevy orange on, and then for even more durability I put 4 coats of clear on it. It's all made by Plasti Kote for engines. Plasti Kote is another division of House of Kolor. This paint is very good in my opinion, just remember to keep your engine clean, no grease or oil on there, use brake cleaner, that cleans it up pretty good, or you can use gas up to you. The paint is good up to 500 degrees, and it is gas and oil resistant. I've never had a problem with it. Plasti Kote also makes regualr spray paint and high temp. header paint. If you look at my pics, my engine is on there that I painted with this. Its dirty right now from sanding, body work, but trust me its nice paint. Just my 2 cents. Mark.

Last edited by sbc307; 08-20-2009 at 10:31 AM.
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Old 08-19-2009, 08:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zbhover
Hello everyone I just have a few paint questions for you all.

First off my main question:

I'm wanting to clean up and paint my 350 that I'll be using for a v8 convertible beetle while I have it out. Is there any engine paint that's better than others??? I'm wanting to go either black or silver (wife hasn't made up her mind yet)


bye
I have always used duplicolor out of the standard rattle can. The key is to not paint over rust or grease and to paint multiple coats within the recoating window (read the directions haha) I usually spray 3 to 4 coats and always have good luck on the block/heads. the cleaner the surface the better the results. Fresh out of the hot tank is best, otherwise use lots of brake parts cleaner and a small wire brush (toothbrush size).

now, on the exhaust, forget about it. I have yet to find a paint that works on headers for more than a couple of months. For that reason I went with the ceramic coated headers.. nothing looks worse than half painted/half rusted headers in my opinion.

I did research powder coating engine blocks several years ago. I came up with several people who said that they had it done. I also came across several people who had concern about powdercoat retaining additional heat causing a potential cooling issue. None of the 3 or 4 people I talked with had experienced any cooling problems. The biggest issue was that the powdercoat shops would only coat unassembled blocks/heads (for liability/safety reasons they dont want oil/grease/gas in their ovens)

Last edited by SS66chevelle; 08-19-2009 at 08:23 PM.
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Old 08-20-2009, 08:45 PM
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I would go with bc/cc system
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Old 08-20-2009, 09:04 PM
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Thanks for the comments guys, but I first posted this about 10 months ago

So I already painted it. I ended up going with some single stage catalyzed automotive paint like suggested in one of the other earlier posts. I also talked to the guy at the paint shop and he said it would hold up well for me. I ended up getting a quart of PPG black, and a pint of metallic silver. I tried finding the cans to get some more info from them, but they are someone in the mess I have in my basement right now from a remodel.........

To clean the engine up, first I wiped all the crude and oil of I could with a rag, I then wired brushed everything loose that I could. Next I wire brushed it with some dawn and water to break up the oil and grease. Then I wire brushed it with some simple green. Then I washed and rinsed it with some more simple green, then rinsed it with water. In the process I also sanded down what little rust was on the block, and other parts

Here are a couple of pics of how the engine turned out. I didn't do the manifolds though..... I'm not planning on keep those.

From this:


To this:






More pics at http://www.zbcreations.com/donor.html
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:24 AM
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looks great!! definitely got brighter.
Looks like a different motor!!
Just something to keep in mind try not to get any gas or alot of oil on that for a while, you know if it get on there, get it off, cause I don't know how gas and oil resistant that is, I never did it before, always used engine enamel in the can. Just sayin, hope it work out great. Good Luck with the project.
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Old 08-21-2009, 07:25 AM
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Catylized paint is the way to go

I painted my SBC block and heads with B/C C/C about 8000 miles ago, and the paint is holding up fine. I am sure that a single stage will do the same.

On the other hand I painted my stroker motor with rattle can high temp chevy orange, then drove on the Hot rod Power Tour (for about 1500 miles in 7 days) with the paint holding up fine as well.

I just think the catylized paint is more stable and less subject to change once it cures.

Glad we could help out after the fact
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Old 08-21-2009, 04:42 PM
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Yeah, its amazing what difference some paint and shiny new valve covers can make

I guess I'll find out how well it holds up............. If nothing else I'll know what NOT to do next time

Eventually, I'd like to build up this engine or build another engine for the beetle to get a little more power out of it. This one is pretty much stock, but only has like 5000 miles on it...... But first I need to get the car done.... LOL

I was planning on having the car done next spring/summer............. And maybe build an engine for it for a winter project sometime.... But with taking about a $20,000 drop in pay this year needless to say extra money for the project has been a little lacking so progress has slowed down Oh well
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Old 08-21-2009, 05:21 PM
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best engine paint..period

Bill Hirsch makes the best engine enamel on the market. You can brush it or spray it. I swear by it. I am in no way connected with the company.

Ron

http://www.hirschauto.com/departments.asp?dept=2
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Old 08-21-2009, 05:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gto_ron
Bill Hirsch makes the best engine enamel on the market. You can brush it or spray it. I swear by it. I am in no way connected with the company.

Ron

http://www.hirschauto.com/departments.asp?dept=2

Thanks for the link, I added it to my bookmarks for future reference........... boy do I have a lot of those............. LOL
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Old 05-06-2011, 05:53 PM
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Painting valve covers

I am reading all the posts, so If I am right, I am going to paint my valve covers, and I was going to use (after I sand blasted) Epoxy Primer w/catalyst, then single stage Black! Advise, thanks, Dana
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Old 05-07-2011, 06:54 AM
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Paint Prep

As it was mentioned a few times in this thread, preparation is key. Metal etching primer on a oil free surface will make any pain hold up to its best ability.

One more story about painted engine blocks.

I had occasion to rebuild my LT1 (don' task). My machinist always bakes the block to burn off all the paint and remove all oil residue and the gunk in it before starting his machining work. He told me "never use that green primer again". I asked why and he said he baked the block twice and it would not come off. After baking twice, there was still a great deal of the "green death" metal etching primer on the block. I translate that to "Use that stuff if you want to get a good surface for paint to reside.

That paint I call "green death" is Martin Seinor trio-prime metal etching primer. It sands great and really latches onto clean metal well. A good start to any painted surface. It does have isocyinates in it, thus the name "Green Death". Make sure you wear a charcoal mask.
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