Equipment needed to spray primer - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 05-30-2009, 06:47 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Down Here
Posts: 3
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Equipment needed to spray primer

I would like some advice on what equipment I will need to spray primer. I hope I am close to paint. I want to strip the paint myself and respray primer. I purchased a compressor a year or two back. What equipment do I need to shop for to add onto the air line for this? I'm asking about dealing with moisture and oil in the air line. I presently don't have a way to regulate the amt of pressure so what type regulator do i need? I won't ask about the best brand of gun but I would like to know what size tip is needed for primer.

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 05-30-2009, 09:17 PM
DocSpeed's Avatar
Parts For Sale Guy
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Maysville, GA
Age: 34
Posts: 43
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Nice to see another dawg in the house!!

You can get a regulator that goes on your spray gun. You can go to walmart and get a cheap gun to spray primer. Something around a 1.8mm nozzle I believe will do the trick. 1.5mm is used for final coats and clear I believe. Gravity fed or syphon type is your choice. As far as oil and water in the line, make sure you drain your compressor prior to spraying and get an inline filter. I just picked one up at autozone for $40. Has replaceable elements and filter most of the moisture out of the air and/or oil. I haven't had any oil in my line so I can't say if this type of filter will work for sure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 05-31-2009, 09:21 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Macedon, NY
Posts: 468
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I just posted an article on fluid tips; Short guide

As for other equipment, you should have a dryer installed. These are cheap and available at harbor freight for $10.00 and up. Low cost guns are available too from $14.95 and up. In addition, you may want to pickup a spitter valve to replace the drain plug on the compressor. These work automatically every time your compressor shuts itself off. Cost $10.00.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2009, 11:59 AM
Irelands child's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Ford engine specifications Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 4,848
Wiki Edits: 8

Thanks: 13
Thanked 179 Times in 161 Posts
There are several very good threads here about equipment.

As far as a compressor mounted strainer - save your money as they are useless. Again, there are several great threads discussing that. Here's one - you need, minimum, 40-50 feet of copper tubing with the water and dirt filters at the end. Air heats as it's compressed, so any air borne water drops become steam and don't condense out until cooled - the reason for the copper and the length. The set up shown is great IF you are doing lots of cars, but overkill for a single. Does my plans for Air Lines look okay?
__________________
Irelands child
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2009, 09:55 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: california
Posts: 135
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Irelands child
There are several very good threads here about equipment.

As far as a compressor mounted strainer - save your money as they are useless. Again, there are several great threads discussing that. Here's one - you need, minimum, 40-50 feet of copper tubing with the water and dirt filters at the end. Air heats as it's compressed, so any air borne water drops become steam and don't condense out until cooled - the reason for the copper and the length. The set up shown is great IF you are doing lots of cars, but overkill for a single. Does my plans for Air Lines look okay?
SInce you are Editing the ford engines on Wiki....maybe you can correct the 385 Section..they are missing the "370 ci" 385 engine used in trucks


52F1
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 06-01-2009, 10:23 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Macedon, NY
Posts: 468
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Irelands child, your dead wrong in your post. When the compressor builds up pressure water droplets donít become steam. It raises the boiling temperature of water so that moisture from the humidity that enters from the air outside the compressor turns to droplets. Thatís what makes the water trap attached in your line work. If it turned to steam it would be pointless to put a water trap in, as steam would flow through the water trap.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-02-2009, 06:19 AM
Irelands child's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Ford engine specifications Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 4,848
Wiki Edits: 8

Thanks: 13
Thanked 179 Times in 161 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjperotti
Irelands child, your dead wrong in your post. When the compressor builds up pressure water droplets donít become steam. It raises the boiling temperature of water so that moisture from the humidity that enters from the air outside the compressor turns to droplets. Thatís what makes the water trap attached in your line work. If it turned to steam it would be pointless to put a water trap in, as steam would flow through the water trap.
To a point, you are correct that entry air contains water and that compressing the air will be adding heat and will indeed raise the boiling point of water to something over the 212*F at sea level. But that water is converted to steam/vapor and is carried over to the delivery medium, in this case copper tubing. That tubing acts as a condenser (very similar, but simpler to what happens at a steam turbine electric generating plant - yes, I do have that experience). That steam that is converted back to actual water droplets at the end of that line will need to be removed - and it's usually by a knockout device, and in the case of a simple compressed air line, it's usually a simple strainer to remove crud and a centrifugal path to remove water droplets.

I suggest you take a better look at the design that was posted by billsnogo in my attachment which clearly shows that arrangement. The strainer at the compressor - it will remove rust and dirt - but never be able to remove water.

You can be even more constructive by adding an air receiver as well to help cool the air - but that's a bit much for the home shop as seldom will more then one tool be used and most home compressors are just too small to consider that kind of item.

There are many links - just do a Google,

Dave W
__________________
Irelands child
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-02-2009, 06:23 AM
Irelands child's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Ford engine specifications Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 4,848
Wiki Edits: 8

Thanks: 13
Thanked 179 Times in 161 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by 52F1
SInce you are Editing the ford engines on Wiki....maybe you can correct the 385 Section..they are missing the "370 ci" 385 engine used in trucks


52F1

52F1 - I don't have a clue as to what makes a 370cid Ford engine "work". The only ones that I have ever seen were a very fews in school buses and medium duty trucks - and never as a performance engine . If you have one and have some good knowledge, you too can do a WIKI edit.

Dave W
__________________
Irelands child
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 06-02-2009, 05:00 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Macedon, NY
Posts: 468
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The poor guy has a small $200.00 compressor with a compression chamber. There are no turbines attached. I haven't a clue as to why youíre bringing turbines into the conversation other than to sound sophisticated. Is there hot steam in the copper line? Yes. The copper line between the compression chamber and the tank. Once the air and steam enter the tank they cool down and condense. As the tank continues to build pressure it condenses further.

Doeís some of that steam entering the tank make it to the exit line that you will use. Yes, itís inevitable. You provide a clear path as your using that line. However, no heat is produced or generated in the exit line causing it to steam up again.

As far as that link with the diagram its overkill and unnecessary for any shop. Simply running your line to where ever you want it then installing a T with a downpipe and shutoff valve would suffice and continue providing the same Tís at each outlet where you wanted it would be enough. Unless of course you wanted to showoff your pluming skills and tell everyone youíve got turbine in you compressor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 06-02-2009, 06:45 PM
Irelands child's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last wiki edit: Ford engine specifications Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 4,848
Wiki Edits: 8

Thanks: 13
Thanked 179 Times in 161 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjperotti
The poor guy has a small $200.00 compressor with a compression chamber. There are no turbines attached. I haven't a clue as to why youíre bringing turbines into the conversation other than to sound sophisticated. Is there hot steam in the copper line? Yes. The copper line between the compression chamber and the tank. Once the air and steam enter the tank they cool down and condense. As the tank continues to build pressure it condenses further.

Doeís some of that steam entering the tank make it to the exit line that you will use. Yes, itís inevitable. You provide a clear path as your using that line. However, no heat is produced or generated in the exit line causing it to steam up again.

As far as that link with the diagram its overkill and unnecessary for any shop. Simply running your line to where ever you want it then installing a T with a downpipe and shutoff valve would suffice and continue providing the same Tís at each outlet where you wanted it would be enough. Unless of course you wanted to showoff your pluming skills and tell everyone youíve got turbine in you compressor.
Obviously you have not a clue as to how to run clean, dry air to spray paint successfully nor have you even understood what I posted - so with that said, adios to you and good luck to the original thread originator!!

Dave W
__________________
Irelands child
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 06-02-2009, 07:12 PM
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Macedon, NY
Posts: 468
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yeah, right, sure. Turbines, what a card. LMAO!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Body - Exterior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Self Etching or Epoxy Primer Ron M Body - Exterior 14 11-30-2010 06:23 AM
Epoxy vs Urethane Primer UKLuge66 Body - Exterior 41 11-23-2008 05:50 PM
PPG K36 primer w/ purple gun BIGSKY Body - Exterior 16 11-20-2006 12:12 PM
Spray Can Primer lincoln64 Body - Exterior 28 09-20-2006 02:20 PM
HELP! Urgent answer needed. About to spray FrankR Body - Exterior 3 08-13-2005 07:33 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:51 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.