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Old 07-08-2009, 05:43 PM
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explosion concerns!

okay I have just read a thread about paint explosions.... and the messages given are very mixed... I have attached pictures of my enclosure I plan on painting in... my plans are to have the compressor, and fans run off of a generator .. and the lights and fresh air hood off of the houses power via an extension cord(s). the only things inside the enclosure would be the lights and fans blowing out...(2 box fans) ... I plan on having the fans blowing out with filters on the inside... then if you look at the pictures the enclosure has a vent at the top on both the front door and back door... I just want some honest opions on what the chances are of this atucally going BOOM!!!!! by the way the enclosure is 12x20x8


thanks
simon

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Old 07-09-2009, 08:39 AM
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Here is the danger. As you spray you will be creating a lot of fumes and particulate, which MAY be ignited by a spark. The box fans may create the spark, any light switch may create the spark, the compressor switch may create the spark. In all likelihood you will be fine but do you want to take the chance.

Proper spray booths contain explosion proof electrical equipment. Most people don't invest in it for home use and MOST people never have a problem.

It only takes one spark to ruin your life. You will find many people who have never had a problem but that doesn't mean you won't. Keep all the electrical switches out of the enclosure, keep the compressor on the outside with the airline only coming in, and try to find a fan with a sealed motor and you will in all likelihood be absolutely fine.

What is that thing like for static? you could set off the big one as you are spraying by brushing up against it. Might want to check that out.

Don't forget a respirator or breathing apparatus.
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:51 AM
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Incandescent lighting would be the last thing I would think you would want in the bomb, er.. I mean paint booth. Anyone who has ever held out a Bic and hit it w/a spray from a paint can knows all too well how much energy is contained in the solvents of paint.

You wonder about the chances that something bad will happen. Chances aren't what you need to know. What you do need to know (and that I can't really help with, except the obvious) is how to isolate spark and heat generating things from inside the room.

There are light fixtures and electrical outlets, etc. designed for explosive atmospheres- even flashlights designed w/explosion risks accounted for. While these things may be beyond your single-use budget, you still might use their principals in the construction and equipping of the booth.

A box fan's induction motor is probably not a bad risk factor (but do not take my word for it). But an incandescent bulb is nothing less than a freaking FUZE to ignite the fuel/air bomb that's created when you start spraying.

The saving grace to your particular set-up, is the flexible, non rigid walls/ceiling. They will hopefully blow out before a lethal amount of pressure can be built up, (I would think, but have no confirmation of this)- but the burn/heat risk is still there in spades, even if over-pressurization risks aren't.

Be safe.
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Old 07-09-2009, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by speede5
Here is the danger. As you spray you will be creating a lot of fumes and particulate, which MAY be ignited by a spark. The box fans may create the spark, any light switch may create the spark, the compressor switch may create the spark. In all likelihood you will be fine but do you want to take the chance.

Proper spray booths contain explosion proof electrical equipment. Most people don't invest in it for home use and MOST people never have a problem.

It only takes one spark to ruin your life. You will find many people who have never had a problem but that doesn't mean you won't. Keep all the electrical switches out of the enclosure, keep the compressor on the outside with the airline only coming in, and try to find a fan with a sealed motor and you will in all likelihood be absolutely fine.


What is that thing like for static? you could set off the big one as you are spraying by brushing up against it. Might want to check that out.

Don't forget a respirator or breathing apparatus.
Very good advice..
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:46 AM
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good thread Simon,glad to see "glass a hoppa" is listining. You'll go far..
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:51 AM
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If you're running a ventilation fan you'll never reach the levels
for combustion.
I watched a painter paint with no ventilation and get a cloud you
couldn't hardly see across the garage, but he never blew,
even with a cigarette.
If you get a cloud dense enough to ignite you're going to have
serious overspray problems anyway, so no one ever reaches that level.
Leave your fan on and you won't have any problems.
Like the thousands out there are doing everyday.
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Old 07-09-2009, 03:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jcclark
If you're running a ventilation fan you'll never reach the levels
for combustion.
I watched a painter paint with no ventilation and get a cloud you
couldn't hardly see across the garage, but he never blew,
even with a cigarette.
If you get a cloud dense enough to ignite you're going to have
serious overspray problems anyway, so no one ever reaches that level.
Leave your fan on and you won't have any problems.
Like the thousands out there are doing everyday.
thank you for being honest
I appriciate all the advice and concerns.... but what I notice with a lot of other threads is that there are a lot of "professionals" and you have a lot of governmental requirements to follow (mainly for insurance purposes or you would not get a license for your facility) I know this since I am in the automotive industry and there is a lot we have to follow as well... I am also the kind of person who is very honest.. I will give people advice on how to do things, and even urge them on... where as alot of professionals will say "you can't do it or let someone who knows what they are doing do it sometimes just not to loose the possible customer or money... but if they try it you will find they will be coming back and letting you do things that they know they can't since you were honest and not thinking with your wallet.. I have worked at the same place for 19 years and have a huge following so I know this method works.. what I am really saying is yes there is danger in everything we do such as driving our cars crossing the street and so on... so lets help each other cross that street or drive a car safley and honestly, lets not try scare each other out of doing it . if we did that the world would come to a stand still from fear and we would eventually perish.
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Old 07-09-2009, 03:48 PM
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The box fans as mentioned are probably OK, as long as you start them before you start to spray and turn them off after all suspended paint has been removed. It is the starting and stopping of the fans that creates the spark. The motors are induction and as such do not have brushes to create sparks. The on-off switch is a different animal that most definitely creates a spark when operated. As mentioned the incandescent bulbs are the most worrysome. With incandescent bulbs their surface temperature more than likely exceeds the ignition temperature of suspended paint, so they are of concern. In industry when incandescent bulbs are used in an explosive classified area they are enclosed usually in a clear plastic bowl to prevent explosive gases or substances coming into contact with the high temperature bulb surface.

Vince
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Old 07-09-2009, 04:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 302 Z28
in industry when incandescent bulbs are used in an explosive classified area they are enclosed usually in a clear plastic bowl to prevent explosive gases or substances coming into contact with the high temperature bulb surface.

Vince
what type of affordable lighting would you suggest?
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Old 07-09-2009, 04:37 PM
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Any lighting that says explosion proof would be fine. It will have a more heavy duty cord and the bulbs will have a full case around them. your biggest concern would be with box fans. The motors are very exposed and they create a lot of spark just off the motor. They are exactly like the little racetrack cars we used to play with as kids. sparks shooting everywhere. Ahhh the good ol days when toys were still dangerous! good luck!!!
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Old 07-09-2009, 05:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmytony007
Any lighting that says explosion proof would be fine. It will have a more heavy duty cord and the bulbs will have a full case around them. your biggest concern would be with box fans. The motors are very exposed and they create a lot of spark just off the motor.
No they do not

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmytony007
They are exactly like the little racetrack cars we used to play with as kids. sparks shooting everywhere.
No they do not.

Read reply #8. Box fans are generally inductive motors that have no brushes (read cheap), so no sparks. The on-off switch when operated will cause a spark, not the motors.

Vince

Last edited by 302 Z28; 07-09-2009 at 08:05 PM.
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Old 07-09-2009, 05:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atichargr
what type of affordable lighting would you suggest?
Explosion proof lighting will make your improvised paint booth far to expensive. Most paint booths have fluorescent lighting because it's operating temperature is much cooler than incandescent lighting.

Vince
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Old 07-09-2009, 06:07 PM
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okay this explosion proof lighting for most is not affordable....is what about flourescent lighting??
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Old 07-09-2009, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atichargr
okay this explosion proof lighting for most is not affordable....is what about flourescent lighting??
Fluorescent lighting would be OK as it is much cooler than an incandescent bulb.

Vince
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Old 07-09-2009, 10:14 PM
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What about outdoor lights with compact fluorescent bulbs? They would be cool and since the fixture is waterproof it should be vapor proof. Just a thought.

http://www.canadianlightinguniverse....kLoc=topSeller

Last edited by speede5; 07-09-2009 at 10:35 PM. Reason: add link
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