Fiberglas questions - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Body - Exterior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-28-2013, 06:46 PM
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: Volkswagen V8 Squareback project.
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Ballwin,MO
Age: 69
Posts: 199
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 30
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Fiberglas questions

Is there any body that can help me with some fiberglass questions? I am wanting to make some flat, reinforced panels, that I will be using on my floor. Ideally, it would be nice to have it smooth on both sides, but at least on the bottom/street side. I am a real novice on this, so I will have a lot of questions.

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-28-2013, 07:04 PM
302 Z28's Avatar  
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2003
Location: North Texas
Posts: 10,839
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 86 Times in 73 Posts
Lay it up on a sheet of glass with layers of cross weave cloth and mat. Do not over use the fiberglas resin you will be surprised at how little it actually takes to wet the cloth.

Vince
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-28-2013, 07:18 PM
sedanbob's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: St. Louis
Age: 66
Posts: 626
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 61
Thanked 80 Times in 77 Posts
For flat panels, you could use any flat surface, like a plastic table top, or piece of plywood. Cover it with aluminum foil attached with some spray glue to keep it from moving around. Wax the foil with regular car wax, 2 or 3 coats, so the fiberglass will come off the foil later. You will need polyester resin (or epoxy resin), hardener for the resin, fiberglass matt or fiberglass cloth, and a brush. Mix some resin with hardener, following instruction on the resin container (the ratio is important). Brush on some resin, lay the matt or cloth in the resin, brush on a little more, chasing out any air bubbles under the matt or cloth. Add another layer of matt/cloth and brush on some more resin, again chasing out any air bubbles. Follow this with another layer of matt/cloth and resin, brushing the resin as smooth as you can, and you will have a pretty strong panel once it sets up. If you want thicker/stronger, just add more layers. For a flat panel, the cloth works well, for panels with more curves and corners, the matt will conform to those shapes better. After it has set up, you can pull the panel off the table/plywood, and peel the foil off the panel. You can sand the panel, and if you have any imperfections you want to fix, regular body filler works just fine. For panels with more complex shapes, you can make the shapes out of pink builder's foam, cover with foil just as you did for the flat panels, then lay the resin/matt over it. The foam is easy to cut and shape, and is pretty cheap. Just remember that whatever shape you make, has to come out of the fiberglass 'mold' once the glass is cured. Worse case, you destroy the foam mold removing it from the fiberglass (no big deal). Hope this helps!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to sedanbob For This Useful Post:
V8Square (08-29-2013)
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 12:34 AM
put up or shut up
 

Last journal entry: saying goodbye to the beast
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Antelope, Ca
Posts: 2,203
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 646
Thanked 268 Times in 244 Posts
using mat with cloth on top will leave it stronger in multiple directions and with a smoother surface. Obviously harder to get out all the air when using cloth but worth it. I did a bunch of repairs on my bosses Vette(hood) and the cloth made it blend so smoothly that if the resin was the same color as what was on the hood you'd never know it was repaired. It's really tough to use a brush on cloth though. You almost have to have a roller, with mat not the case. Mat is easier to work with and doesn't create as much fibers flying in the air, which irritate the skin. Wear long sleeves and tape the sleeves around your wrist, wear gloves, proper respiration, and goggles. Believe it or not, that stuff can even irritate the heck out of your eyes. You don't want it on nothing. When I know I'm working on fiberglass I search for an old long sleeve shirt that's trashed and so I just throw it away on my way out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 04:29 AM
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: Volkswagen V8 Squareback project.
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Ballwin,MO
Age: 69
Posts: 199
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 30
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Thanks for all of yje useful hints. So, general feeling. Do I use mat or cloth? These will be flat panels. What about stiffeners for support? What should I use?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 05:03 AM
STUPID is as STUPID does...
 
Last wiki edit: Crankshaft Coalition Wiki Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Stupidville, USA
Posts: 1,746
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 11
Thanked 87 Times in 81 Posts
Go here and do some poking around:
Fibre Glast Developments Corp. | Fiberglass & Composite Materials
Don't let the site overload you. There is a ton of info here.
The easiest way to lay this up is on a sheet of plate glass. Find an old sliding door for a couple of bucks at a yard sale. Cleaning and waxing is key to getting the panel to release.
I would use both materials for the added strength. Go with a 10 or 18oz. fabric to build the cross section quicker. If you layup a couple of layers of fabric with the mat sandwiched between them it will be very strong.
Also look at the fiberglass tape. It is very handy for adding "ribs" to flat panels such as yours and for strengthening the outer perimeter. Of course you can cut strips off a roll for this, the tape is just so much easier to work with.
Lots of options here so, really, the sky is the limit.
If you want to go carbon fiber the process is EXACTLY the same! The material is a bit more spendy but it really isn't that much more. I will be replacing all of the fixed windows in my Bad Ast project with carbon fiber panels I will pull directly off the glass itself...
Have fun!
Mark
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 05:21 AM
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: Volkswagen V8 Squareback project.
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Ballwin,MO
Age: 69
Posts: 199
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 30
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by astroracer View Post
Go here and do some poking around:
Fibre Glast Developments Corp. | Fiberglass & Composite Materials
Don't let the site overload you. There is a ton of info here.
The easiest way to lay this up is on a sheet of plate glass. Find an old sliding door for a couple of bucks at a yard sale. Cleaning and waxing is key to getting the panel to release.
I would use both materials for the added strength. Go with a 10 or 18oz. fabric to build the cross section quicker. If you layup a couple of layers of fabric with the mat sandwiched between them it will be very strong.
Also look at the fiberglass tape. It is very handy for adding "ribs" to flat panels such as yours and for strengthening the outer perimeter. Of course you can cut strips off a roll for this, the tape is just so much easier to work with.
Lots of options here so, really, the sky is the limit.
If you want to go carbon fiber the process is EXACTLY the same! The material is a bit more spendy but it really isn't that much more. I will be replacing all of the fixed windows in my Bad Ast project with carbon fiber panels I will pull directly off the glass itself...
Have fun!
Mark
Mark. Thanks for the info. So, you wouldn't recommend using a reinforced piece of tempered hardboard to lay the work up on? When waxing the mold, what do you use? Paste wax? I know I have a lot of questions.
Tom
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 05:43 AM
STUPID is as STUPID does...
 
Last wiki edit: Crankshaft Coalition Wiki Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Stupidville, USA
Posts: 1,746
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 11
Thanked 87 Times in 81 Posts
Hey Tom,
Like was stated in a prior post, you can use anything that is flat and clean. The trick is to make that surface non-porous so the resin has nothing to "bite into". The plate glass is automatically non-porous, is generally very flat, is very easily cleaned and a coat of release wax will do the job everytime.
As far as release wax goes you can (also) use just about anything but I have a couple of cans of wax I got from the Fibre Glast site that are specially formulated for this process. In other words there is nothing in the wax that isn't needed.
Spend some time on the Fibre Glast site and they will answer a lot of your questions. Of course they will probably raise a few more but that's alright...
Sign up for their "clearance corner" emails and you can probably get everything you need cheap. That's how I bought the carbon fiber for my van... On sale! Cost me less then the fiberglass would have!
Mark
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 07:53 AM
33Willys77's Avatar
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 454
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 7
Thanked 63 Times in 61 Posts
For my floor, I glassed in 5/8" plywood. Made it very strong and easy to mount seats, shifter etc., plus it makes a good insulator.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:16 AM
STUPID is as STUPID does...
 
Last wiki edit: Crankshaft Coalition Wiki Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Stupidville, USA
Posts: 1,746
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 11
Thanked 87 Times in 81 Posts
Yes, that is probably the route Tom should take. Doing that also makes it possible to build in wire runs & seat belt reinforcements. Good suggestion!
Mark
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:20 AM
Faith - Respect - Trust
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ontario
Age: 59
Posts: 3,508
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 192
Thanked 638 Times in 572 Posts
I've been following this thread and find it very interesting, my working with fiberglass and knowledge is a little limited. When I have used it I have done the flat surface method with mold release on it...after it's set up, I sanded the resin and sprayed on 2 coats of gel coat, let it set up and block sanded it and Epoxy primed it. Is this something that would be recommended? I know that if your using gel coat, spraying it on first and then applying the cloth would make sense but, when I tried that, I couldn't get the mold release to release....maybe not enough mold release?

Ray
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #12 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:28 AM
sedanbob's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: St. Louis
Age: 66
Posts: 626
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 61
Thanked 80 Times in 77 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by 33Willys77 View Post
For my floor, I glassed in 5/8" plywood. Made it very strong and easy to mount seats, shifter etc., plus it makes a good insulator.
That is similar to the floor on my sedan - 6 layers of fiberglass on the bottom, 1/4" resin saturated wood, and 6 layers of fiberglass on the top. Places where seatbelts are mounted the 1/4" wood is replaced with 1/4" x 2 1/2" steel flat bars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #13 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:33 AM
STUPID is as STUPID does...
 
Last wiki edit: Crankshaft Coalition Wiki Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Stupidville, USA
Posts: 1,746
Wiki Edits: 1

Thanks: 11
Thanked 87 Times in 81 Posts
The gelcoat has two purposes. One is to add "color" to the part and two is to hide the actual glass fibers. Using it as you did is okay but not really necessary if you are priming and painting anyway.
As far as de-molding goes it really depends on the "mold" you used. Like I said plate glass is easy as the 'glass has nothing to bite into. Once you start to de-mold it will peel up like a vinyl sticker off it's backing paper. It's kind of kool actually...
If you want to leave the 'glass (or carbon fibre) bare this is a good method but you will want to stay away from sanding the substrate as that will show through, and be highly magnified by, the gel coat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
The Following User Says Thank You to astroracer For This Useful Post:
69 widetrack (08-29-2013)
  #14 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 08:56 AM
Mitchman's Avatar
Grand Master of the Universe
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 614
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 73 Times in 63 Posts
V8S... Remember to mix and lay only what you can work with in about 5 minutes. Cut your parts and have them ready to go. If you need to lay on top of cured 'glass, sand the surface relatively smooth for adhesion and to chase out bubbles more easily.

I found that on large areas, spreading resin on a piece of mat laying on a piece of cardboard with a bondo spreader works well and is faster than dabbing with a brush. Then moving that whetted sheet to the work causes less disturbance to the work already performed.

The fibers of a mat are glued together. The resin dissolves the glue. Woven 'glass cloth has no glue in it, but is a bit stiffer to work with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #15 (permalink)  
Old 08-29-2013, 12:24 PM
Registered User
 

Last journal entry: Volkswagen V8 Squareback project.
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Ballwin,MO
Age: 69
Posts: 199
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 30
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Lot of good answers. Now, another question. When you put down one layer of mat, do you wait for that to dry before you put down 2nd, 3rd, etc layers?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Body - Exterior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Doors on fiberglas model a coupe MODERN A Body - Exterior 11 08-05-2012 05:30 PM
Fiberglas lessons you never want to experience! BarryK Body - Exterior 43 08-26-2010 07:19 AM
Fiberglas Willys body fred56 Body - Exterior 13 11-08-2009 08:46 AM
Fiberglas or urethane old91 Body - Exterior 2 03-12-2004 09:16 PM
Fiberglas fenders badgesx2 Body - Exterior 7 09-21-2003 05:42 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.