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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2009, 01:24 AM
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Relax, you're too anxious. You've got my Phone number and I have your address. Call me when your ready and I'll come over then we'll see what you have and proceed from there. I think you'll be alright. If not we'll get it corrected.

Now go get some shuteye, it's late.

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2009, 09:36 AM
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good light ??

If you are not in a professional booth with good light it can be hard to see what's going on when you are shooting....the mix needs to be right for temp and humidity... In the old days I had a trouble light in one hand and the gun in the other... and we drank water from a hose.... didn't wear helmets and still survived. ...
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Old 06-07-2009, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
If shot dry, it can lighten a metallic up and the surface feel rougher, as the flakes tend to set on the surface and not down and to the paint film, and also stand more on edge reflect more light, lightening the appearance. Metallic shot dry=lighter wetter=darker. Alot of things can change the appearance of a metallic from how its shot to reducer choice and temps and humidity, which is why all parts when shooting a metallic you should try to shoot at the same time.

If you want to spray wetter, these are some things to try. Open up your fluid control knob, turn down your air pressure (at the gun regulator), move slower with your passes, move in closer to the surface. If spraying wetter and you have your gun set up correctly as well as are using good gun technique and overlap and you still wind up with some mottleing or striping, then you can perform a drop coat to even things out. It should be done while the previous coat is still somewhat wet and can still accept the drop coat in with it (metallic is able to settle into the previously shoot coat I guess you could say).

Basecoat will dry to a fairly dull looking apperance though.

I haven't noticed a big problem with basecoat shot a bit dry, but if shot too dry, it can affect the adhesion of the clearcoat, so you should try to shoot somewhat wet (not heavy) and do any drop coating when it can be accepted.

You cannot judge match with just basecoat alone, as the clear will change appearance. When doing a test panel for checking match, a clearcoat is always applied to the panel before checking match.

If your base has set awhile and is dry enough (yours probably should be by now) you could wet the fender by wiping on some water to kind of simulate the clear (at like the door or hood edge) and kind of see what the match looks like, but different lighting conditions (natural, flourecent) can affect the match.
Metallics are tough to get a perfect match panel painting, which is why they are usually blended into existing color on adjacent panels, then those panels cleared. With a good blend, a slight mismatch between the new and old colors then will be difficult for the eye to pick up.

Unless the base has only slight texture or orange peel, it is usually hard to notice once its buried in clear, but if you have a dry and rough metallic, it often takes some hammering on of clear to bury it before you start getting a good wet look to the clear.

Hi K
I adjusted my gun today and it came very nice, but i have a question for you..when I sprayed the front bumper i noticed that when i moved to 1 side the other side get black particles like ashes that laid on top of the surface. why is that? less paint? or something?
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2009, 05:18 PM
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Hmm, not really sure what that would be from. Sure its not something floating around in the shop, or falling from the ceiling or you, or your equiptment or hose, coming from a heater.
I could see metallic particles floating around in the air or overspray and landing on the surface, but don't know if they would appear black or not.
Do you have ventilation? Guess you will have to investigate and see if you can figure out where they are coming from. Make sure the area is clean where you are painting, and wear a spray suit and spray sock.
Although it sounds like you have stuff floating around and landing on the surface and not occuring in the paint or spitting out of the gun, other possibilitys may be, if airhose is old and breaks down inside it can put black specs into your airsupply and then spit out into the paint. And another possibilty for black specs in a paint job is too much humidity (wetting down the floor) which according to something Barry K has mentioned before, can cause the isos to clump together, leaving either white, grey, or black specs that look like dirt. I think the clearcoat would be more prone, but iso's can be in basecoat as well if activated.
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Old 06-07-2009, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
Hmm, not really sure what that would be from. Sure its not something floating around in the shop, or falling from the ceiling or you, or your equiptment or hose, coming from a heater.
I could see metallic particles floating around in the air or overspray and landing on the surface, but don't know if they would appear black or not.
Do you have ventilation? Guess you will have to investigate and see if you can figure out where they are coming from. Make sure the area is clean where you are painting, and wear a spray suit and spray sock.
Although it sounds like you have stuff floating around and landing on the surface and not occuring in the paint or spitting out of the gun, other possibilitys may be, if airhose is old and breaks down inside it can put black specs into your airsupply and then spit out into the paint. And another possibilty for black specs in a paint job is too much humidity (wetting down the floor) which according to something Barry K has mentioned before, can cause the isos to clump together, leaving either white, grey, or black specs that look like dirt. I think the clearcoat would be more prone, but iso's can be in basecoat as well if activated.

Should I sand it down with 1500 and shoot another coat?

I think the black(dirty particles) probably I didn't spray right, I squeezed and released and squeezed and released while I was spraying it. It's more like can squeeze.

Do you have to squeeze and hold it while you spray?
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 06-07-2009, 09:57 PM
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if you have a lot of trash or black specks in the paint, you could knock it down some with 1500 and spray another coat.
But there was a long thread on here about sanding basecoats, and although most I never had a problem with ppg brand basecoat going over with 1000 to flatten trash and nibs, some members here determined based on experimenting and what they were seeing, you should not sand chromabase flat, knocking down lightly with 1500 I don't think should be a problem. Here is that thread. Interesting test on sanding base coat paint (against the data sheets recommendation)

start your spray motion keeping gun parallel to surface and your distance even, pull in trigger, at the end of your spray stroke release trigger (and follow through) before you stop your spray stroke and spraying in the opposite direction. Going the other direction overlap your previous stroke 50 to 75 percent doing the same thing, start off your stroke, pull trigger, realease trigger towards the end of your pass and follow through.

Your wrist may bend throughout your spray stroke, but gun should be kept parallel, you want to avoid arcing the gun outward at the end of your pass.
You should start moving the gun before pulling the trigger, and release the trigger prior to finishing your stroke.
www.itwifeuro.com/Editor/files/GUNTEQU01.pdf

Last edited by kenseth17; 06-07-2009 at 10:04 PM.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
if you have a lot of trash or black specks in the paint, you could knock it down some with 1500 and spray another coat.
But there was a long thread on here about sanding basecoats, and although most I never had a problem with ppg brand basecoat going over with 1000 to flatten trash and nibs, some members here determined based on experimenting and what they were seeing, you should not sand chromabase flat, knocking down lightly with 1500 I don't think should be a problem. Here is that thread. Interesting test on sanding base coat paint (against the data sheets recommendation)

start your spray motion keeping gun parallel to surface and your distance even, pull in trigger, at the end of your spray stroke release trigger (and follow through) before you stop your spray stroke and spraying in the opposite direction. Going the other direction overlap your previous stroke 50 to 75 percent doing the same thing, start off your stroke, pull trigger, realease trigger towards the end of your pass and follow through.

Your wrist may bend throughout your spray stroke, but gun should be kept parallel, you want to avoid arcing the gun outward at the end of your pass.
You should start moving the gun before pulling the trigger, and release the trigger prior to finishing your stroke.
www.itwifeuro.com/Editor/files/GUNTEQU01.pdf


thanks for helping...I repainted and it came out awesome no dirty black or anything...I moved around and go with my gun. I didn't do that last time..I just stay in one spot and swing around...


My friend has a question for you

I have some (Dupon ChromaBase) basecoat left over and my friend wanted to use it to paint his bumper..


He would like to know if he can use (duplicolor clear) already mixed in the can for his clear or He has to go with Dupont ChromaClear?

thanks
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 06-08-2009, 07:50 PM
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Boy I have no idea if it would work together, but probably not a good idea to use the duplicolor clear. Even if it does happen to not react with the base and stay adhered, its probably not going to provide the uv protection the basecoat needs and will not leave you a very durable finish. I've used some sort of rattle can clear over basecoat before (believe it was tempo) in a pinch on a small test panel for checking match, and got no reaction, but no way would I want that to be my finish on an exterior car part subject to the environment.
I'd use the chromaclear as that on the other hand you know will work with the chromabase, which as designed to work with and recommended by dupont as a clear for chromabase. Even if you purchased a cheaper automotive 2k urethane clear, such as nason or other second line, it should work with the chromabase and provide a lot better results and durability then the duplicolor stuff will give you.
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Old 06-08-2009, 07:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
Boy I have no idea if it would work together, but probably not a good idea to use the duplicolor clear. Even if it does happen to not react with the base and stay adhered, its probably not going to provide the uv protection the basecoat needs and will not leave you a very durable finish. I've used some sort of rattle can clear over basecoat before (believe it was tempo) in a pinch on a small test panel for checking match, and got no reaction, but no way would I want that to be my finish on an exterior car part subject to the environment.
I'd use the chromaclear as that on the other hand you know will work with the chromabase, which as designed to work with and recommended by dupont as a clear for chromabase. Even if you purchased a cheaper automotive 2k urethane clear, such as nason or other second line, it should work with the chromabase and provide a lot better results and durability then the duplicolor stuff will give you.
Very good advice..he just wanted to know because he bought 1 qt of DupliClear (not rattle can)that said mixed ready to spray...
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 06-08-2009, 09:34 PM
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Since you have a spray gun, forget using that lacquer clear (or is it enamel based???) and shoot a 2k urethane on it. Be sure you wear a good fitting respirator, and have fresh cartridges and filter, and you ventilate the area you are shooting in.
If instead of lacquer based, the dupli clear stuff happens to be alcyd or acrylic enamel based, you could probably find a hardener for it, which should help its durability and cure times, but your really best off picking up a decent automotive urethane to use that you know will work well, have uv protectors and should last awhile. I recommend southern polyurethanes universal clear if you are looking for a quality affordable clear.

Last edited by kenseth17; 06-08-2009 at 09:55 PM.
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