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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-26-2013, 08:30 PM
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That is a great question, we only sell non-leafing aluminum as a Rust sealerin a 1970s Mobray chemical introduced a permanent type bridge primer using moisture cured resin, that was completely waterproof. This resin dries by atmospheric moisture. Bridges are usually over water thus this resin is used. This resin although waterproof is not airtight. Nonleafing aluminum pigment was added to block oxygen. Multiple coats forms a labyrinth by the flake so oxygen cannot penetrate. This system is called The three coat polyurethane system. It is one of the most powerful systems in the industrial coatings marketplace. Now it gets to the antique car hobby around 1978. It was sold for two years intact. I will be kind and not mention names. It was hyped up as a Rust sealer and metal filler. The powers that be, decided they don't want silver they want black, after all they're painting the bottom of their car. To make matters worse they change the resin and the thinner and change the pigment. Now we have a slick glossy surface that's difficult to paint over, turns green in four days in the sun, will not sand to a feather, and won't stick to clean steel. Master coat does all of those things because we've always stayed true to the original formulation.as some of you know I am retired my family has removed me from the car show booth because of my cheery disposition over this matter.I hope this answers your question
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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-26-2013, 08:31 PM
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I would suggest getting an air needler to remove any heavy rust spots on the exterior of the frame your sand blaster won't touch. This will remove any layered rust so you can finish it with the sand blaster.

Air needlers are made for heavier steel like your frame and will also remove paint and other coatings that may be hard to remove. They are relatively inexpensive and can be found for under $50.
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:33 PM
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How long have you been using SPI epoxy? I thought it has only been relatively recently, as in the last several months or so?
I think it is Brian who only recently tried it Josh.
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:35 PM
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Josh, I haven't been using it long...I think I tried the Epoxy for the first time in November of last year. I was talking to an old customer of mine that had started to use the product since I went on my own. He gave me some Epoxy to try and I made 3 test panels. If you want to know exactly what I did, let me know and I will either PM you or Email you with the tests. Suffice it to say, I was less than kind with the way I used the product. I expected it to fail...it didn't, it hasn't yet to this day.

I know that what I was using before would not stand up to the test I put it through...I waited several months again (if it was going to fail, it should have happened within a short period of time), expecting failure before I started using it and haven't looked back. I haven't tried all the products, some I don't or haven't had a use for yet but any product I've tried has stood up as good as or better than expected.

I'm looking forward to using the bed liner shortly, Barry was kind enough to send me several samples showing how rezilient it is...very impressive.

Ray
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:37 PM
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I think it is Brian who only recently tried it Josh.
True John, Brian started using a couple of months back, when he got going on his truck project.

Ray
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:38 PM
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That is a great question, we only sell non-leafing aluminum as a Rust sealerin a 1970s Mobray chemical introduced a permanent type bridge primer using moisture cured resin, that was completely waterproof. This resin dries by atmospheric moisture. Bridges are usually over water thus this resin is used. This resin although waterproof is not airtight. Nonleafing aluminum pigment was added to block oxygen. Multiple coats forms a labyrinth by the flake so oxygen cannot penetrate. This system is called The three coat polyurethane system. It is one of the most powerful systems in the industrial coatings marketplace. Now it gets to the antique car hobby around 1978. It was sold for two years intact. I will be kind and not mention names. It was hyped up as a Rust sealer and metal filler. The powers that be, decided they don't want silver they want black, after all they're painting the bottom of their car. To make matters worse they change the resin and the thinner and change the pigment. Now we have a slick glossy surface that's difficult to paint over, turns green in four days in the sun, will not sand to a feather, and won't stick to clean steel. Master coat does all of those things because we've always stayed true to the original formulation.as some of you know I am retired my family has removed me from the car show booth because of my cheery disposition over this matter.I hope this answers your question

So the product is supposed to be applied over rust, without media blasting or any prep beyond removing scale?

Kelly
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:44 PM
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Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
So the product is supposed to be applied over rust, without media blasting or any prep beyond removing scale?

Kelly
It's supposed to go on metal as clean as you can get it. Here, I found you a data sheet...

MasterSeries Coating Line: Silver Data Sheet
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 08-26-2013, 08:46 PM
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No not at all. Sandblasting is always recommended. In bridgework where lead paint is involved and sandblasting is prohibited by law this primer will encapsulate the lead paint the rust and will generally have a service life of about 20 years. Case in point would be the Pittsburgh Homestead high-level bridge. This bridge was coated with two coats of MC silver and one coat of AG 111 argent blue. At the end of 14 years this bridge had less than 5% corrosion. When people tell you that it works better over rust what it means it usually won't stick to anything but rust. I don't know of any industrial coatings of any kind that work better over rust.
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:57 PM
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Originally Posted by Pats55 View Post
No not at all. Sandblasting is always recommended. In bridgework where lead paint is involved and sandblasting is prohibited by law this primer will encapsulate the lead paint the rust and will generally have a service life of about 20 years. Case in point would be the Pittsburgh Homestead high-level bridge. This bridge was coated with two coats of MC silver and one coat of AG 111 argent blue. At the end of 14 years this bridge had less than 5% corrosion. When people tell you that it works better over rust what it means it usually won't stick to anything but rust. I don't know of any industrial coatings of any kind that work better over rust.

Okay that makes a little more sense.

Thanks for the data sheet Josh.

Kelly
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Old 08-26-2013, 08:58 PM
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It's supposed to go on metal as clean as you can get it. Here, I found you a data sheet...

MasterSeries Coating Line: Silver Data Sheet
Thanks Josh, that datasheet looks to be my age. I'll have to have Angela fix it up a bit
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Old 08-26-2013, 09:14 PM
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then you should see the data sheets and scientific literature I read all day at work...
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