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Old 09-20-2010, 12:06 AM
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Fuel pump and regulator question

I am in the process of install the fuel system in my truck. I have 1/2" fuel line from the fuel cell to the engine compartment. I am running a 383 stroker with a 750 double pumper that makes 430 horse. I would like some opinions on which electric fuel pump and regulator I should buy and which ones to stay away from. Should I run a return line? And where should I mount the fuel pump and filter close to the tank or close to the engine?
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Old 09-20-2010, 01:09 AM
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Carter electric, Aeromotive, MagnaFuel, Mallory Comp 110 or 140, or Holley Blue will work fine. Holleys are a bit little noisy, unless you go to the HP Holley billet pumps that are a gerotor design(as is Mallory) instead of vane pump like the Holley Red, Blue, Black, MagnaFuel and Aeromotive Pumps are. Mallory and Holley make decent regulators, so do Aeromotive and Magnafuel but they are more expensive. A return line isn't necessary but does help the pump live longer.

Electric pumps have to be near the fuel tank or cell as they will push fuel well, but don't pull fuel well at all, and preferable mounted lower than the tank so that they are gravity fed. Use a good high flow filter between pump and tank, to keep trash from damaging the internals of the pump.
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Old 09-20-2010, 08:26 AM
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electric pumps are a pain in the butt. most of them are loud and the brushes wear out quickly. Mallorys are quiet (comp70, 110, 140) but they don't last long. holleys are very loud and wear out even quicker. These pumps are Ok for a track car but not OK for daily drivers. Over the years, I have used 2 or 3 holleys, 3 or 4 carters, and 4 or 5 mallory pumps, and they all seem to fail around 10,000 miles.

For a daily driver, I would use an in-line msd efi pump (100.00) due to it's quietness and brushless design (long life). Then use a return line with a return style regulator that can be turned down to 5 psi (aeromotive makes a good one). Use a 3/8" return line from the regulator to the tank. A return line is a must for this pump as it will make 100 psi if not allowed to flow the excess back to the tank.

mount the pump near the tank and as low as possible (level with the bottom of the tank). use a 100 micron filter before the pump if your tank is dirty, don't use the typically 40 micron filter that autozone sells as it will starve the pump on the suction side. But these msd pumps can eat tank junk like crazy without problems. I think the model is msd model 2200 or 2500 (something like that). They only make one so it will be easy to find.

I have been messing with electric pumps for the last 25 years and the msd efi pump with a return line is the best setup I have found. quiet, long lasting, good flow, and cheap.

I stumbled across the msd pump setup for a carb when I helped a friend of mine converted a 280Z with a 2.8 liter efi turbo engine to a 350 chevy with a q-jet. Best electric pump setup I ever did for a carb'ed engine. He drives his car 300 miles a week for the last 4 years without any pump issues (60K miles).
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Old 09-20-2010, 08:37 AM
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here it is.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MSD-2225
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Old 09-20-2010, 08:47 AM
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more information

http://www.msdfuelinjection.com/efi_fuelpump.html

looks like it will flow around 70gph at 5-10 psi.

note: if the pump is loud then it is not getting enough fuel on the suction side.
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Old 09-20-2010, 12:53 PM
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Stay away from any electric pump that uses the "rotary vane" style - they are not made for continuous duty and they are notorious for failing. They are ridiculously noisy and they WILL leave you stranded - that is in part why so many guys are running two of them.

Vane style pumps include the Holley blue, red, black, carter etc etc. What you need is a pump that was designed for continuous duty which means selecting a pump with a gerotor design. Gerotor pumps are extremely quiet and they are very reliable. They don't handle any form of dirt in the fuel line so a pre pump filter is mandatory. Also, make sure you wire the pump using a relay - wiring kits are available with everything you need.

You do not need a return line. You do need to mount the fuel pump as close as possible to the fuel tank (they are designed to push fuel, not pull it) and it must be below the tank pickup so that it can gravity feed the fuel to the pump.

Here is a link to the pump I am using on my zz502 with a Holley street avenger 870. You will need a fuel pressure regulator to limit the pressure to 5psi Max 6psi is too much and it can contribute to running overly rich, especially at idle (ask me how I know this )

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HLY-12-125/

Last edited by SS66chevelle; 09-20-2010 at 01:05 PM.
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Old 09-20-2010, 01:04 PM
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yes. those vane pumps are very loud (holley red, holley black, carter). Louder than the engine!!! sounds like lawn mower in the back seat.

the mallorys and the new holleys use rotors and are quiet but they also use brushes (which is bad). avoid electric motors with brushes, as they wear out in short order and will leave you stranded.

the msd pump is as good as an oem efi pump when it comes to durability. they are very quiet (unless they are starved for fuel). brushless design that goes and goes.
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Old 09-20-2010, 01:35 PM
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I Agree that brushless designs have an advantage in that there are fewer consumable parts. That said, my alternator has brushes and so does my starter The EFI pumps are putting out 50+ PSI and I was concerned about regulating that all the way down to 5 or 6 for a carby as it seems like that may put a lot of stress on the pump possibly causing it to heat up and reduce it's lifespan. At any rate the gerotor pumps are designed specifically for continuous duty, durability and reliability and specifically designed for carby applications. Those factors combined with success stories of other guys using them led me to choose one over the other. Thats my .02 anyway..




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Originally Posted by 454C10
yes. those vane pumps are very loud (holley red, holley black, carter). Louder than the engine!!! sounds like lawn mower in the back seat.

the mallorys and the new holleys use rotors and are quiet but they also use brushes (which is bad). avoid electric motors with brushes, as they wear out in short order and will leave you stranded.

the msd pump is as good as an oem efi pump when it comes to durability. they are very quiet (unless they are starved for fuel). brushless design that goes and goes.
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Old 09-20-2010, 02:52 PM
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Not only will a lack of return line heat up the pump, it will heat up the gas. Asking one reg to go from 50+ psi to 5 accurately is too much IMO.

I have a holley black. I wrapped it with black pipe insulation and then attached it with large hose clamps. If you use the stock metal bracket bolting the metal pump body to your metal car, every vibration will be heard. I can't tell mine is on unless I stick my head by the gas tank or feel the pump.

If you are going to go with a generator style, the Walbro 255L can't be beat on performance or price. It'll support 600HP. Just make sure you get a reg made to drop EFI to carb pressure. Otherwise the spring pressure may not be enough to reseat the valve.
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Old 09-20-2010, 03:19 PM
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no no, the pressure is not high at all. the regulator takes care of that.

the pressure after the pump and after the regulator is the same (with in a few psi).

the efi pump can make lots of pressure but the return line doesn't allow it to. there is actually less stress on the pump when the regulator is set low.

I have run experiments with this pump so I know what is going on with the pressure. if you just pump the fuel to the engine compartment then loop the fuel back to the tank then there will only be less than 1 psi at the engine compartment (no regulator). Then if you install a regulator, it just restricts the flow a bit to get 5 psi, but there will never be 50 psi anywhere in the system, maybe 1 psi more then what the regulator is set to. the pump is under no stress with a return line practically open.
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Old 09-22-2010, 12:38 PM
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Thanks for the info guys. Still unsure of which pump to run
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Old 09-22-2010, 01:14 PM
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Like I said, I have "been there and done that" with electric fuel pumps.

what I described above will give you years of good and quiet service.

here is the pump and return style regulator.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/AEI-13301/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MSD-2225/

use a 3/8 inch return line. A 5/16 inch line will work but 3/8 inch would be better.

don't worry, the regulator is not reducing pressure from 50 to 5, the regulator is just restricting flow to make 5 psi which will be the max fuel pressure in the lines. That is how a return style regulator works. it is not a "dead head" regulator system.

like I said, stay away from fuel pumps with brushes. They don't last long.
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