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Old 03-10-2006, 10:25 PM
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Fuel tank conversion to EFI

I'm planning to install an '87 5.0 engine in my '54 Ford Courier sedan delivery. I realize I need to modify the fuel delivery system. My question is can I modify the existing tank that's in the car now?

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Old 03-11-2006, 03:13 AM
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Sure. Many get by just fine using the stock pickup tube with and add a return line for a bypass regulator. In cornering or heavy acceleration the fuel can slosh away from the pickup (which in a carbed car isn't a big deal, but with EFI it can cause power loss or stalling). Many alter their tanks to have a drop-down sump. Just an inch or so will do. You basically drill a few holes in the bottom of the tank and weld a sump on. Summit sells stamped steel sumps with NPT fittings already in them so you can add your own AN fittings. That way when you accelerate, brake, corner, the fuel sloshes, but can't flow out of that sump. You've basically added a 2-cup reserve so the pickup gets fuel during those maneuvers.

Its always wise (in my opinion) to use a bypass regulator and a return line. Make sure your return line is plumbed in above the level of the top of the tank. The filler neck is a good place for it. If the return line deadheads into liquid gasoline it can cause a pressure spike at the injectors. Its like if you were blowing through a straw into the air and then put the straw in a glass of water. It takes more pressure to blow through the water. Return lines work best when they never encounter a restriction.
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Old 03-13-2006, 09:19 AM
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I'm running an EFI six in my 63 Rambler. No sump or anything. I've never had a stalling problem. Right now I have a fuel gauge problem (inop). When the car is a little hard to start I know fuel is low and I need to get to a station! You really shouldn't let an EFI system get to low on fuel anyway. I usually keep at least 1/8 tank in it, and have never experienced a problem. A lot of that has o do with the flow of the fuel pump though. I'm running a 4.6L in-line six (stroked Jeep 4.0L -- now 280 inches) and using a fuel pump designed for a 5.0L V-8. It has to suck a lot of air to be noticeable, and at that time I had better not be far from a gas station! Yes, I've run it out a couple times. Have to pour a little down the throttle body to get it started when the line is completely dry.
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Old 03-13-2006, 09:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by curtis73
Sure. Many get by just fine using the stock pickup tube with and add a return line for a bypass regulator. In cornering or heavy acceleration the fuel can slosh away from the pickup (which in a carbed car isn't a big deal, but with EFI it can cause power loss or stalling). Many alter their tanks to have a drop-down sump. Just an inch or so will do. You basically drill a few holes in the bottom of the tank and weld a sump on. Summit sells stamped steel sumps with NPT fittings already in them so you can add your own AN fittings. That way when you accelerate, brake, corner, the fuel sloshes, but can't flow out of that sump. You've basically added a 2-cup reserve so the pickup gets fuel during those maneuvers.

Its always wise (in my opinion) to use a bypass regulator and a return line. Make sure your return line is plumbed in above the level of the top of the tank. The filler neck is a good place for it. If the return line deadheads into liquid gasoline it can cause a pressure spike at the injectors. Its like if you were blowing through a straw into the air and then put the straw in a glass of water. It takes more pressure to blow through the water. Return lines work best when they never encounter a restriction.
I have done several 5.0 fuelies and yes there could be a slosh problem during heavy aceleration, I keep mine half full when racing or it will starve out about 40 feet after the launch.

The return line can be routed to the drain fitting with no ill effects noted by anyone that I have ever met.

An aux one quart tank can be plumbed in using the drain fitting, etc.
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Old 03-13-2006, 07:40 PM
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EFI fuel tank conversion

Thanks for your response. You mention a 1 quart aux tank. Exactly where would you plumb it in? Would I be wise to add this in addition to a sump?

Again, thanks.
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Old 03-15-2006, 11:17 AM
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You can put a quart or half gallon tank anywhere between the main tank and EFI fuel pump. I'm assuming xntrik is talking about using the drain plug in the bottom of the tank to go over to a near by quart tank. In that case the bottom of the quart tank would have to be no higher than the bottom of the main (or original) tank. That way the fuel level in the quart tank would be the same as the main and no return line would be required. The quart tank won't slosh around much, so the EFI pump feeds off the quart with the return line feeding the main tank.

If you put the quart tank say under the hood (or anywhere between the main tank and engine -- inside a frame rail on a truck works good), you'd need a fuel pump to feed it and a return line. You can use the normal mechanical pump on the engine to feed the small tank as long as it passes enough volume, then have a return line about 3/4 of the way up the side of the tank back to the main tank so it won't over flow. Then the EFI pump draws from the small tank. A standard electric pump can be used also. You will need a one-way valve in the line to prevent the small tank from draining back to the main. As long as the small tank has fuel in it when the engine starts it should be fine. I'd put the return line from the EFI system to the small tank and let the gravity feed return/overflow line handle the excess. That or put a T in the return line right after the small tank.
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Old 03-17-2006, 10:42 PM
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EFI fuel tank conversion

I contacted Summit Racing about their sump kit and was told that the return line should empty back into the sump, in other words directly back into the fuel. So now I guess there are several schools of thought here. Should I run the return line into the filler neck or into the sump itself? If I run the return line into the filler neck do I cap off one of the fittings in the sump? I'm sure there's experience with both methods so perhaps I could get some clarification on which is best or are both OK?

Thanks to all of the responders out there.
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Old 03-18-2006, 02:54 PM
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If you are going to the trouble to modify that tank, do what Summit says to do, they have experience with their product.

Just remember an EFI fuel pump moves a LOT of volume compared to a HV mechanical pump that is pumping to a dead-head regulator.

As for the 1 qt auxillary tank, plumb it in parallel with a parallel return line, and suck the fuel out of the aux tank with the EFI pump. Bottom of aux can should as low as the bottom of main tank.
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