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Old 03-27-2004, 09:35 PM
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Garage floor wet in humid weather - HELP

Hey guys,

I have a big problem. I just moved into a new house with a garage I love. It's 30 X 36 and fits both my 69 Z-28 and 68 Charger very nice with lots of room to spare. My big problem is that I live on the east coast and when it is humid the floor sweats like a pig. It is horrible, during the spring and summer the floor is constantly wet, Not just a little but a lot. It's concrete and it seems like the previous owner may have had oil all over the floor, I don't know. What do I do I am very affraid of the cars beginning to rust. Please help. Thanks.

Dave

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Old 03-27-2004, 09:39 PM
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ventilation. i used to have that problem, i got an old carpet drying fan, the squirrel cage jobber that has the outlet at the bottom, blowing directly on the floor... and wd-40.

when it dries out this summer, put a few coats of that baer water proofing stuff on it.
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Old 03-27-2004, 10:17 PM
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Thanks for the help but I don't know what the WD-40 is for? Can you explain?

Thanks
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Old 03-28-2004, 09:02 AM
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wd as in water displacement... sprayed on tools, metals, etc, it'll keep your stuff from rusting.
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Old 03-28-2004, 09:49 AM
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Thanks,

How about Thompsons Water Seal? Is that the same as Baer waterproofing?
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Old 03-28-2004, 10:18 AM
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thompsons, in my experience isn't very long lasting, it needs to be reapplied to maintain it's effectiveness. the baer stuff is a little more money, but it works and to my knowledge doesn't need reapplication...

behr is the stuff.
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Old 03-29-2004, 08:07 AM
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I used the Behr paint on my floor. It sucked. It came up within a month. I READ the directions and FOLLOWED them to a T. From now on, I'll forget about reading the directions and it will probably work....
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Old 03-29-2004, 08:15 AM
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Beenaway2long did you try anything else? Do you have any suggestions? Thanks.
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Old 03-29-2004, 10:40 AM
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I'm in the same boat as you. Looking for a GOOD product that won't break the bank....

I almost wonder if the drainage around your shop is insufficient. Your water table may be higher than the bottom of your slab? Try digging on one side , and see how far down you get before hitting water. Just a thought...
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Old 03-29-2004, 01:14 PM
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There was no vapor barrier put down when the floor was laid down. The problem you are going to have is what ever you put down will get pushed up by the water.
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Old 03-29-2004, 01:25 PM
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What about that NASTY drylock stuff that you paint the basement walls with, then topcoated?
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Old 03-29-2004, 04:11 PM
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The drylock is a great idea if it sticks. My garage is on a hill and I'm sure the water isn't going that high. Thanks for the suggestion. Lets keep the thread going maybe someone will come up with a better solution.
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Old 03-30-2004, 08:19 AM
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Just finished my new shop - been checking threads many times for floor sealant/paints. A friend works at a floor sealant place and told me they put a sealer on that 'bonds' to the concrete by soaking into the pores.It works best, he claims, in paint areas, where you have gas and oil spills, etc. they just put it in a Ford dealership/paint booth/bodyshop. It is NOT a shiny, slippery epoxy that will stick to your tires, not a paint at all but rather a 'sealant'- it covers well and I think is thinned with water. It is clear and the floor has to be super clean but it is not required to etch it with acid. I will look up the name if anyone is interested. No, I have not used it but cost is reasonable, he says, and he will get me what I need
( he figured 2-10 gallon buckets) for his cost- I WILL try it as soon as temp is high enough to dry it with doors open- (it's been raining here for 3 days!) Also, since I have gas heat and I have it set at 50 degrees- I have had NO MOISTURE or condensation in the building-(yet!) and I think the heat is why... The floor is not insulated, just the outside perimeter of a couple feet. The building is steel in and out- 34x52, 3 overhead doors, seperate office and restroom/tiled and paintbooth. The product is sold and applied by a company called Stetson, I think- I will research it more but other things have kept me busy!!!
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Old 03-30-2004, 10:38 AM
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Thanks for keeping us posted. It sounds like a great product. Let us know as soon as you hear. Any word on the costs?
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Old 03-30-2004, 01:13 PM
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Cold concrete Vs warm moist air

Always results in wet concrete.
I run a dehumidifier in my shop 24/7.
I have it set up with a hose so it drains off constantly.
I also run a fan across the floor to keep the air moving.
The overhead door is only opened when needed, or if it is unusually dry outside.
I do not have a big flshover problem, but it takes constant vigilance!
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