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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2005, 02:19 AM
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If you are working with any chemicals, read the warnings, and if possible the MSDS sheets
That is a good thing. I think the older I get the wiser I get when it comes to chemicals. MSDS sheets can be found on the net if you do not get them with the thinners, solvents, etc. They do list the side effects, reactions, etc. Really a good thing to know for a few minutes of your time.

Kevin

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2005, 03:02 AM
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I wear spectacles, this could be a safety advantage one day, but when using angle grinders and the like I wear safety glasses nonetheless. I have that kind that's used for gas welding, which is closed all around. The problem is whatever I do, there are always a few sparks getting in and burning little holes in my spectacles...

Regards
Martin
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 01-18-2005, 06:09 AM
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safety glasses

When grinding, you should use a face shield, as this protects your face from the little slivers and rocks that fly around. Keeps the junk out of your nose, and you don't eat it, either.
You can get face shields with changeable lenses relatively cheap at welding supply places, and through places like harborfreight.com. Unlike glasses that are close to your face and make your eyes work to adjust to any flaws in the glass, a face shield that has some distortion won't ruin your eyes, unless you are wearing it for hours and hours without a break.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 01-20-2005, 07:21 PM
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Use gloves when around high speed tools and grinding tools. Hurts like heck when the chuck hits your finger. Wear a respirator when dealing with dusts and fumes. Only use four legged jack stands, the three legged tip over too easy. I store gas and highly flammable stuff in a cabinet outside in a spot that doesn't get too hot. Best advice: Listen to what people have done and learn from them, not knowing is one thing but knowing and not doing is another.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 01-21-2005, 08:44 AM
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Keep your knives, chisels, drills, etc. sharp. You have much better control over your tools when they are sharp.
You must use a lot of arm power when using blunt tools, which means it will also slip away (hope that is correct English ) with a lot of power into......your leg , just finished parts...

Leen
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 01-21-2005, 04:58 PM
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This is the kind of post that really gets my attention. I have worked in the mining industry for 30+ years and I have unfortunately seen MANY accidents, most of them in the repair shop. Even if we were working on mining equipment the tools are the same and the injuries would be just as bad in a home shop. Always wear a respirator when grinding no matter what the material and eye protection is a no-brainer. Also don't forget ear protection as tinnitus(a constant ringing in the ears that will never go away)is the result of exposure to noise. Eye protection,respirator and ear plugs are the most important tools in your garage. I wish that I had listened 30 years ago but maybe I can convince someone else before it is to late for them. To all you young guys, PLEASE LISTEN YOU ARE NOT SUPERMAN IT CAN HAPPEN TO YOU!
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Old 01-24-2005, 07:36 AM
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[Also don't forget ear protection as tinnitus(a constant ringing in the ears that will never go away)is the result of exposure to noise.]

Rock concerts, drag racing and working in a weave room fixing looms when I was young did that to me. I have to wonder what will happen to these kids that have the Thump Thump stereos in their cars now.
I now wear plugs AND headphones doing some task's. Especially grinding sheet metal and tubing ends when you get that high pitch. Wish I knew then...

True story, went to see Skynyrd and ZZ Top not long ago, as they were wanding everyone to enter (times have changed) the door guy wanted to know what was in my pockets. "Ear plugs my man, I'm getting old" He just laughed and passed us on in.
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 01-24-2005, 08:09 AM
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428- Believe me I know what you are talking about and these guys who think they are superman had better listen now as they may not be able to "listen" to ANYTHING a lot sooner than they think. Guys just try and imagine a terrible ringing in your ears that you will take to your grave. If you hear even a slight ringing or a sound sort of like crickets now when you are in in a quite room then you are already well on your way. You may think my description is funny right now but when you start to hear these sounds over top of everyday noise and find that you have trouble understanding what people are saying to you it will become VERY serious to you but you wont be able to do a damn thing to cure it. THE TIME IS NOW! A loud stereo may seem "cool" to you but I guarantee a hearing aid wont!
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 01-25-2005, 06:31 PM
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oldred thank you for posting that, I see now that I could stand to change a few of my ways, although I've only ever grinded without ear protection a few times, the time that made me change was when wire wheeling a trailer hitch, from then on I stuffed some cotton balls in my ears to deaden the sound. But thanks for the info to remind me to always protect the ears.
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 02-10-2005, 02:08 AM
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C'mon people...lets add some safety issues to this thread.

Last edited by Kevin45; 02-12-2005 at 03:26 PM.
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 02-18-2005, 03:36 PM
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i guess, that's a nice one

try to switch off the battery charging unit before you unplug the battery...

if not, it may go *boooom*... then you know that there was some hydrogen.


i've to admit that i've never thought about that, a buddy told me that a few days ago....
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 03-08-2005, 07:14 PM
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OK, I screwed up. What do I do now???

I used PVC to for my compressed air distribution. I did it because I didn't know it was a bad thing (and potentially dangerous) at the time. I am kicking myself for not researching the correct products to use before I did the job. I usually research everything thoroughly but I blew it on this one. I trusted advice I got from an unknowing engineer. I wished I had used copper as that seems to be the way to go.

Here's what I did:

I had a detached garage built to house the everyday driver cars and used my already existing garage for my workshop. I had the new garage connected with my workshop via a covered breezeway.

Here's a picture:
http://hotrodders.com/gallery/data/3...rage2.jpg?5305

The new garage is on the right and my workshop is on the left.
To keep the noise and heat out of my workshop, I put my 5 horse 80 gallon compressor in the new garage and routed the 3/4" PVC through the breezeway (during construction) into the attac over the workshop and down 2 opposite walls inside the shop.
Pictures:
http://home.austin.rr.com/lt1/Blaster.jpg
http://home.austin.rr.com/lt1/Bench.jpg

What do I do now?
Just leave it and not worry about it?
Or, should I just replace the downpipes that are in the workshop? I could also replace the pipe from the compressor to the entrance of the breezeway in the new garage. That would have all the exposed areas converted to copper pipe.
It would be major job now to replace the whole line!
Should I bite the bullet and replace all of it?

I am not having much problem with water in the line but I am interested in safety.

Advice will be appreciated.

Roger
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 03-09-2005, 06:57 AM
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air pipe

Bite the bullet, tear out the plastic pipe and use proper steel or copper pipe like you should have used the first time. Whast the heck kind of engineer told you to use PVC? One of the first things they tell you in any engineering curriculum is that different fluids have different requirements for safe transport, storaage, and use.
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2005, 04:20 AM
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This is a topic that has come up numerous times and prety much seems to be a no win on either side. I have ALWAYS heard plastic piping is a no no. I have read where plastic has shattered sending sharp fragments in every direction. Now whether the temperature has anything to do with it I don't know but would thing it a factor. Especially considering that you are going from inside to outside back to inside. If you do not want to bite the bullet and replace everything right now, I would at least replace your drops with something more substantial. That way if it (and it may not) decides to go it will be shielded from human contact. Then you could replace what went bad. But what you have running up one wall and down the other I would replace just for the safety aspect.

Kevin
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 03-12-2005, 09:07 AM
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H'mm

I have on occasion recommended steel pipe for compressor piping and got yelled at because of that..as far as I know it is a code requirement for compressed air lines..It is kinda interesting as to how some try to do something else and get into trouble with it..

Anyway I am sticking with the tried and true in my shop..

I am also usign the industrial type full face shield for grinding and such..I have found the real industrial shields to be comfortable and EZ to use..

OMT
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