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-   -   Give me some ideas on prepping this thing (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/give-me-some-ideas-prepping-thing-225843.html)

novafreek6872 11-07-2012 05:29 PM

Give me some ideas on prepping this thing
 
Got a body here with about 50% peeling CC and 50% still in great shape. Its the original factory paint on the whole car.

Bad idea just to take the peeling parts down to factory primer and scuff the good parts and then shoot epoxy over everything? Do they even need to go all the way to primer or just get all the peeling CC off?

Trying to figure out the most cost effective, time and money, way to do this. But I definitely dont want any kind of failure later on.

Ideas greatly appreciated!! :thumbup: Sorry for the low quality pics

Andy

http://i1075.photobucket.com/albums/...38e0e512b2.jpg


http://i1075.photobucket.com/albums/...c0faa21641.jpg

mitmaks 11-07-2012 07:17 PM

I would sand entire car with 320 and finish it all the way to 400-600 and then your epoxy and topcoat. I would try to take all panels to primer. Chances are paint will peel on the rest of the car sooner or later (most likely sooner than you think).

novafreek6872 11-07-2012 07:25 PM

That would be a safe route it seems to me. On the initial DAing down to the primer you would use 320?

How about if I did like you say, go down to primer with 220 or 320, put on 2 or 3 good coats of epoxy and block THAT out up to 600...then go bc/cc.

Trying to figure it all out

mitmaks 11-07-2012 07:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by novafreek6872 (Post 1608419)
That would be a safe route it seems to me. On the initial DAing down to the primer you would use 320?

How about if I did like you say, go down to primer with 220 or 320, put on 2 or 3 good coats of epoxy and block THAT out up to 600...then go bc/cc.

Trying to figure it all out

that would be perfect

novafreek6872 11-07-2012 07:30 PM

What causes the clearcoat to peel in such a random manner on these cars? I mean other than the hood,top,decklid...where its all completely gone from UVs I would guess.

mitmaks 11-07-2012 08:25 PM

Age, exposure to elements. My daily driver is 20 years old and it has same problem. Its rarely garaged, exposed to elements, not waxed, washed once in a while. All these things take in account for aging of paint.

Chevymon 11-08-2012 12:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by novafreek6872 (Post 1608423)
What causes the clearcoat to peel in such a random manner on these cars? I mean other than the hood,top,decklid...where its all completely gone from UVs I would guess.

Thats not really random, just the areas that get more sun.

novafreek6872 11-08-2012 04:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chevymon (Post 1608488)
Thats not really random, just the areas that get more sun.

Sure, I get it. It just seemed random, but must have had to do with which way the car was parked everyday and how the sun was hitting it.

So on the initial DA -ing, 320? Seems like that would take forever to get down to factory primer...No?

deadbodyman 11-08-2012 07:46 AM

I do these peelers all the time,I think the two main causes are #1 the sun and #2 thin clear.
You hve a few options first off its hard to tell from just a pic but the cheapest and fastest way is to only do the top surfaces (that Irock decal might be a little pricey) and from the molding down looks pretty good.
so start with a razor scraper and carefully scrape ALL the clear of,if there are stubburnd spots sand those with 320 getting the clear offdone this way theres no need for a sealer just base it and clear it,that little strip between the T-top and the rear glass is ez and the deck is pretty short so that wont take much time but the hood is a different story that might take a while with 320...basicly you dont have to sand ALL the clear off just sand it until it starts feathering nicely.
if you have a lot of dents or dings and if the clear isnt cooperating sanding with 180 is much faster but you'll have to seal it with a good epoxy(SPI reduced about 20-30 % works great)once the top surfaces have been epoxied then sand with 320 If you want to paint the whole car all it needs is 320 and shoot no need for any sealer of any sort on the sides unless you do a lot of dent and ding work on them.
If you use a razor scraper BE CAREFULL not to gouge the surface or or all bets are off... theres a few tricks to using the scraper like honing the new blade on glass and good quality blades ...I use them all the time without any gouges but it takes some experiance and technique I find most guys need help using razor blades so try it in a few spots and see if its working for you but for heavens sake dont keep going and gouge or scratch up the whole car then you'll be in trouble,so be very careful and if you have any question just ask, theres some other little tricks too..

deadbodyman 11-08-2012 08:00 AM

A side note ,Looking a second time it looks like theres not much clear on the tops at all if thats right this may be a pretty EZ job...

69 widetrack 11-08-2012 09:32 AM

Andy, If it where my car I'd take the whole car to bare metal for several reasons.

#1) I agree with previous posts that it's the elements that caused the clear to come off and the lower parts still "look" good but what happens if the degeneration of the clear has already started and a year or 2 from now that clear underneath your fresh paint lets go...Your the guy who painted it and will take the blame.

#2) It's going to take a day at the most and even on a bad say $30.00 worth of material...cheap insurance.

#3) Take the car down to metal, if you DA the car down to primer only chances of getting wave is much more likely and I saw the reflection in your Nova, it was straight and that's what you want. The car, from what your saying is straight right now, SPI and a little blocking will keep it that way. The red on your car is a fairly dark color...and you know what dark colors and any imperfection in the body are going to look like in the end.

#4) The only paint jobs that people ever talk about are the really good ones and the really bad ones. The nice thing about that situation is you get to decide what people say and think of your work and it's always easier to get more work when they say good things about it.

Take the little extra time and do it properly so you know what you have when your done. Even Ford under their paint warranty programs in the 90's paid to strip the entire vehicle, they didn't do it because they liked to give money away, they did it because they didn't want the problem to come back and bite them a year or two down the road.

Hope this helps
Ray

tech69 11-08-2012 10:15 AM

check how the grit is affecting the scratch as well. It will tell you a lot about the adhesion. I also like to take door, hood, decklid edges down to at least primer or bare metal. If you block it out really nice with a 240 or maybe even a 220, you can go back over the whole car with a DA and an interface pad with 320 then again with 400-600.

The main thing is finding what needs to be fixed. I usually clean the car really good, get a good light on it, then sight down the sides of it. Then I fix what I can see by blocking on it and filling. If it's a new car with one paint job(assuming) I'll use a da to feather the area and reveal lows and highs, which works great cause you know exactly where to apply filler for tiny stuff, but the DA prep isn't always the best when you have layers and layers of stuff, unless you want to break it open and bring it to metal. Anyhow, Once I got those areas I can visibly see fixed and filled I guide coat the whole panel and see what that tells me. Depending on the color and gloss on the car some more stuff might reveal itself. I'm currently working on a yellow dull superbee, and if you were to look at it before we worked on it you'd never guess filler needed to be added in the areas we applied it to. The color and gloss on the car made it incredibly difficult to find what to repair. I used guide coat and the man next to me didn't. I had to go over everything he did when he wasn't looking...our secret.

tech69 11-08-2012 10:17 AM

As for stripping...bubbles? Any surface rust when you do reach metal? And oxidation on areas that aren't horizontal? Stripping is always best but do know it may not be straight as you think.

69 widetrack 11-08-2012 10:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tech69 (Post 1608592)
As for stripping...bubbles? Any surface rust when you do reach metal? And oxidation on areas that aren't horizontal? Stripping is always best but do know it may not be straight as you think.

They never are as straight as one thinks when looking at what appears to be a pristine vehicle...use your hands to feel and especially your eyes to see...what you miss with these tools, guide coat and reflections will show where problem areas are. Find and object in the distance and watch for any distortion in the reflection because after you put shinny clear on the car that's what your going to see.

Ray

novafreek6872 11-08-2012 11:14 AM

Thanks guys for the great tips. :thumbup:

I like to get the panels wet with water or W&G and sight to kind of simulate the clear being on the car, and guide coats are always great too.

I think I am going to strip the car to the metal, Ray is right, it won't really take that long and then there wont be surprises later. (Ray told me this days ago btw, and I still persist in looking for the easy way lol) I have lots of time and the epoxy I want to use is $100 for 2 sprayable gallons so what the heck right?

But anyway, thanks so much for all the tips on peeling car bodies and how to go about this. I'm sure I'll have more questions along the way.

Andy


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