Head Grooving Update ???? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Engine
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2006, 08:46 PM
xntrik's Avatar
Save a horse, Ride a Cowboy.
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 5,131
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Head Grooving Update ????

What's the latest feedback from the "head grooving" guys?

You remember the thread: The quench pad grooving to increase the chamber swirl.

Hot Rod Ethics

I am very interested in hearing how the race season and the street performance testing is doing.

I still think it works..

Automotivebreath..... are you still out there buddy?

www.readershotrods.com add your ride

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-09-2006, 09:13 PM
automotive breath's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 891
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by xntrik
Automotivebreath..... are you still out there buddy?

www.readershotrods.com add your ride
I have been busy with much of the same. Most of my work is with race cars and an occasional street driven hot rod. Here's an example of my involvement.

A good friend, Glenn was having problems with his super pro 66 Mustang. Some of you may recognize the car from Ford races in the Houston, New Orleans or Gulf Port areas. He runs a small flat tappet cam shaft in a high compression 351 Windsor. The car was running mid to low 10s but he was having problems with trace detonation at launch with a transbrake.

I cut grooves in his AFR heads and he opened the squish clearance. Normally I would expect the reduced squish to create detonation. The result was low RPM power that was too much for the car to handle. I was there for the first night out after the modification. The car ended up in the trailer because he couldn't control the wheel standing.

He has now softened the combination to allow launch with out excessive wheel standing. Needless to say he's convinced.

Here's some picture from his project and other recent activities.












Last edited by automotive breath; 08-09-2006 at 09:41 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-10-2006, 07:38 AM
DoubleVision's Avatar
Not Considered a Senior Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Heart Of Dixie
Age: 43
Posts: 10,733
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 19
Thanked 77 Times in 71 Posts
It`s funny I had this same idea about a year and a half ago and suggested to several people on here to try it out, but never got around to doing it myself.
my idea was to place the line long ways with the chamber, since the shock wave from the quench pad will be pushing the mixture out towards the open part of the chamber. Another trick is to chamfer the quench pad right where it enters the combustion chamber so the quench effect can also push it up towards the upper most part of the chamber. I never knew ir any of these things would work, and since I don`t build engines on a regular basis or have a dyno, I had no way of knowing if it was effective, I thought it likely would be.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-10-2006, 12:35 PM
Everything is HAMMER!
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: belleville, Michigan
Age: 27
Posts: 348
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 2
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
If theirs power to be gained, for basically free and it doesn't effect emissions or fuel econ, why don't the oems do it? I'm sure someones told them about it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 08-10-2006, 01:40 PM
DoubleVision's Avatar
Not Considered a Senior Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Heart Of Dixie
Age: 43
Posts: 10,733
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 19
Thanked 77 Times in 71 Posts
Likely because the OEMs knew about Quench a long time ago, and they knew the benefit of it. Chevrolet could have easily made a D dish piston and with the deck height at .025 and the gasket thickness at .028 would have created a .053 quench, which is respectable, but they never did this during the emissions era from 1972 to present. It would have helped performance and would also have created lower emissions due to a more efficient burn of the mixture. But they always stayed with the tried and true full concave dish piston that didn`t create any quench at all. In many tests a tight quench only showed a 3 horse power gain so they likely figured it wasn`t worth it. But I never seen anyone do a emissions test between a non quench and a quench engine and check the results.
Chevy`s performance engines of the 50`s 60`s and early 70`s that had flat top and dome pistons had quench due to the thin head gasket and .025 deck clearence, so they were the only engines that benefitted from it. In the end, there was alot of things the OEMs knew about and never changed it, and likely is because of cost, whatevers cheaper to make stick with it, or it could be the same reason the company I work for goes by which is "if it makes perfect sense we don`t do it, if it makes no sense at all, we do it"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-10-2006, 04:01 PM
automotive breath's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 891
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by stroker_SS
If theirs power to be gained, for basically free and it doesn't effect emissions or fuel econ, why don't the oems do it? I'm sure someones told them about it.
DoubleVision brings up some very good points; most production engines can be improved with a few basic modifications that have been known for years.

I'm fairly certain American automobile manufactures have conducted tests of the grooves. As for why they havenít put it into production, I don't know. The grooved head concept is patented so I don't think a production run would be free.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Engine posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:
Insurance
Please select your insurance company (Optional)

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Chevy BB Head Milling crashtech Engine 2 05-14-2005 12:16 PM
Welding Aluminum Cylinder Head Chevy21 Engine 13 05-08-2005 09:17 PM
'65 6 cyl. Mustang Head Gasket Problem 68Ranchero General Rodding Tech 6 04-27-2005 12:20 PM
3.8 Ford Head Gasket Questions RCastle Engine 17 04-11-2005 10:14 AM
sb dodge cyl head identification/specs #73avenger Engine 0 02-15-2004 12:35 AM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.