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Old 10-14-2008, 10:02 AM
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Headliner Tutorial

There are always a lot of questions about this topic, replacing a headliner with bows. I recently replaced a headliner in a '53 Chevy 4 door, which was part of a complete new interior in the car. The original headliner had holes in it where the mice had gotten up in the headliner cavity and made nests.

If you are not trying to custom match the headliner to the rest of the fabric in the car, you can simply order a new headliner from places like www.kanter.com. I always start by deciding which half of the headliner (driver or passenger side) is in the best shape to make patterns from. In this case, the driver's side of the headliner was the best, so I started taking the headliner down on the passenger side of the car. After removing the front and rear metal window moldings and the panel that covered the center post between the doors, I pulled the headliner fabric down around the front and rear windows, where the fabric was stapled in place. I then started to pull the fabric down along the sides above the doors. Once you get a front corner started, it will pull out from under the headliner retainer strips pretty easily, although there are teeth on the strips to hold the fabric in place, and some times the fabric is stubborn. You can see where the mice had taken cotton from the seats and fiberglass insulation from the roof to make nests. It helps to have an upholsterer's regulator (like an ice pick only longer and with a smaller plastic handle) to dig out the fabric that won't pull out easily. Once one side is down, disconnect all the bows on that side and let the headliner hang down to the floor. lMost of the older cars had holes on each side to mount the bows in. If there are holes, mark them somehow. This car had two sets of holes available, so I circled the correct hole with magic marker. I lucked out here, 'cuz this car had clips to hold the bows that unscrewed on one side, and holes that the bows were stuck into on the other. This made dropping the headliner from the passenger side easy. Once the headliner is down, go to the other side and remove the screws that hold the headliner retainer strips in place. They are usually all the same size, but it doesn't hurt to keep track of which hole each screw came from until you're sure that's the case. After the retainer strips are removed, take the bows out of the holes,the whole headliner should be free and you can take it out of the car. Don't remove the bows yet. I always lay the old headliner upside down on the garage floor, number each section, and mark the ends of the sections as to what order they go back together in. Once that is done, you can take the bows out of the listings. Be sure to number the listings and the bows as you take them out. I put a piece of masking tape on each bow and write the number s on the tape. These bows were color coded on the ends. I'm sure that meant something to the original installers, but I couldn't find corresponding colors near the holes where the bows were hung.
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:05 AM
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I'm ahead of myself as far as pictures, so I'll just post pictures here.

..................................IMPORTANT....... ..........................

Look at the middle picture. Notice that the listings on the original headliner have been cut back a few inches at the ends to expose more of the bow. Almost all listings are too long on a pre-made headliner. If you don't cut the listings back, the listing bunches up at the bow's curved part, which makes the headliner fabric bunch up. If the headliner fabric bunches up, you can't stretch the headliner enough side to side to get the wrinkles out. This is the biggest mistake most first time headliner installers make.
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:19 AM
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Now is the time to remove the windlace from around the doors. This particular windlace had a unique way to mount it. Usually, there are strips around the openings held in place with metal tabs that the windlace is stapled to. This car had cardboard strips sewed to the windlace that slipped into hollow areas that were held in place loosely with the metal tabs. Also, the center post had a custom fit floor to ceiling piece of cardboard that the windlace was sewed to for both front and back doors. This whole assembly was like handling an octopus, although once I got the hang of it, it went in pretty easily. If I had it to do over again, I would have just put the cardboard tacking strips in, bent the tabs down, and stapled the windlace in. If you don't have specialized feet for your sewing machine you may be forced to do it that way anyway. Do it whatever way is easiest for you. There are also areas in both the front and back of the car that had fabric strips sewed to the windlace in strategic places, like next to the front pillar next to the windshield. By stapling the windlace in, you can position these fabric pieces in later, rather than having to sew them in place ahead of time.
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:55 AM
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Now we're ready to make the patterns for the headliner pieces. Most of the pieces had specific shapes to them, but the middle section was a straight piece which only required a measurement, not a specific pattern. I always make cardboard patterns of 1/2 of each section. To do this, I disassemble the pieces, fold them in half according to where the fading on the fabric is and cut each piece in half. (remember that I had already marked where each piece goes. if you didn't do that before, do it before you take the headliner apart) You also want to measure how wide the listings are. Now you can lay each piece out onto the cardboard and trace it, adding onto areas at the sides to give you more to work with when the headliner is being put back in. It's also a good idea to add extra in the front by the windshield, and in in the back by the rear window. It's also a good idea to mark the patterns in the order they get sewed together in. This headliner had a couple areas that were not individual pieces, but rather just had listings sewed to them in specific locations. I made an extra pattern to trace onto the back side of those pieces to guide me when I sewed the listings on. Once all the patterns are made, just trace them out onto your fabric and cut them out. ( I spilled WD-40 all over my patterns, luckily after I had already used them! ) Start with the largest piece first, which is almost always the rear piece with the sail panels. It most likely will not fit across the roll of fabric, (top to bottom) so it will have to go down the roll. (side to side) Cut all the pieces the same way on the roll of fabric you're using. If you don't, you may have problems later with one part stretching differently than another part it is sewed to, which can create some ugly wrinkles. Sew the listings onto the pieces that need them in specific locations, and then sew the headliner together front to back in order, or back to front in order sewing a listing on each seam as you go. If you can't sew the separate pieces and the listing together all at once, sew the listing onto the edge of each top piece first, and then sew the parts together.

It's good to mark some position notches about a foot apart on each piece to watch as you sew, but don't get crazy trying to keep the two pieces exactly aligned as you sew them.
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:59 AM
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Once again, I'm behind with my pictures, so here's the sewing process:
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Old 10-14-2008, 11:00 AM
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And some more pictures: You can see that I marked the center of the front and rear pieces both on the inside and the outside of the fabric. This is navy blue Ultraleather.
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Old 10-14-2008, 11:15 AM
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Now that the sewing is all done, it's time to put the headliner back in the car. Obviously, the windlace and the panel that covers the pillar between the doors has to go in first. Then the headliner retaining strips get screwed back in. I like to glue a little extra padding onto the top of the retainer strips to let the fabric slide over them easier. They can get rough and rusty in some older cars. These weren't bad. I don't do this in the front and rear next to the windshield and the rear window because the metal moldings go over these edges, and I don't want anything to get in the way when putting the moldings back in. I also replaced the fiberglass insulation the mouse destroyed with some 1" dacron wrap that is easier to work with. Notice I left it back away from the area the dome light gets mounted in. Measure carefully where the dome light goes and make the smallest possible cut you can make to let the wires for the light fixture go through.
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Old 10-14-2008, 11:59 AM
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Now we're ready to put the bows back in and hang the headliner. This is a good time to clean up the bows before they go back in the listings. I like to spray then with WD-40 or penetrating oil, and go over them with steel wool. Then I wipe them down and they're ready to go back in the listings. Obviously, put the bows back in the correct order in their corresponding listings, and hang the bows in their respective holes and/or clips. This particular car had a specific place to start, at a strut just in front of the dome light. This listing had a stake wire bow that wasn't attached at the sides of the car, but slipped over a half dozen metal tabs that were then bent over to hold the stake wire and the listing solidly in place. Then the rest of the bows were put in place. (I did a headliner in a '49 Packard that had a retainer clip just in front of the rear window that held the rear-most bow in place, and then the headliner was re-attached from back to front. Most cars have an obvious starting point which should be apparent when you take down the headliner.) The listings need to be cut back to a spot just after the bow turns downward at each end. The next logical step is to make sure the headliner is hanging centered in the car, which means there should be the same amount of over hang at each side. Now you want to find the center of the front and rear pieces and staple the fabric to the tacking strip around the top of the windshield and the top of the rear window. Only go from the center to a place about 15" from each pillar both in the front and back. Leave the corners open at this time. Now you have it centered from front to back, so go to the sides and center it from side to side. You don't need to have an exact center, but one listing should be in the same place on each side of the car somewhere near the middle. Now you can trim off any excess fabric and tuck the headliner material over the windlace and under the headliner retaining strips. There are specific tools you can buy to do the tucking, but I made these two out of putty knives. The one with the red handle is very flexible, and the one with the black handle is very firm. I ground the corners down smooth on both of them, and bent the blade on the red one. The other tool is the regulator I talked about before. This is also the perfect tool to help you locate the screw holes for the front and rear window moldings. I shove one through the mounting hole to find where the screw goes, and let one regulator hold the molding while I locate the other holes. Once I get one screw in place, I just use one regulator to find the rest.
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:13 PM
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Now you're ready to finish off the headliner at the four corners. At the rear sail panels, start by pulling down next to the door frame and tucking the fabric under the retainer strip. Then you can pull back and toward the corner of the window where the fabric is stapled. Some headliners require gluing rather than stapling, so if that's your situation, make sure you use a good high temp contact adhesive. The front corners are done much the same way, but these areas are finished off in many different ways on different cars, so pay attention how is was put together when you take the headliner out. I'm sorry I don't have pictures of some of these last steps, they seem to have disappeared into the bowels of my computer. I will take some pictures of the finished headliner when my customer comes back in with the car in a couple weeks.
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Old 11-05-2008, 12:46 PM
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The '53 Chevy was back in today, so I took some pictures of the finished headliner.
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Old 04-15-2010, 07:25 PM
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Dan thanks for the headliner info answered alot of my questions. All but one. How the heck is the windlace attached to the metal strip that goes down by the kick panel in the front? I have a 53 and have no clue how it was done

thanks
Rob
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Old 04-16-2010, 07:13 AM
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That's the tricky part. There is a groove that the windlace slides into in the metal retainer that holds the kick panel. The way the original was done, the windlace had a piece of welt cord sewn to it in that area and the welt cord slipped into that groove. Without sewing in the welt cord, you could hold the windlace in the groove with hot glue. Trim down the fabric on the back side of the windlace and glue it in with the retainer loose. You'll have to determine where the windlace first meets the retainer. Then attach the retainer. The retainer needs to be loose anyway to slip the kick panel in.
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Old 04-16-2010, 01:28 PM
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thanks Dan
that would make scents. I have some small piping that will fit in the channel so maybe I'll sew that to the windlace and then thread it in. Thanks again now I unstand how it was installed.

Rob
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Old 04-16-2010, 01:44 PM
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The trick is that you have to sew the welt cord in real close to the windlace rod so that it looks right. You need to use something really thin to make the welt out of. Good luck, it's not easy to do.
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Old 10-18-2010, 07:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
This particular car (1953 Chevy) had a specific place to start, at a strut just in front of the dome light. This listing had a stake wire bow that wasn't attached at the sides of the car, but slipped over a half dozen metal tabs that were then bent over to hold the stake wire and the listing solidly in place. Then the rest of the bows were put in place. (I did a headliner in a '49 Packard that had a retainer clip just in front of the rear window that held the rear-most bow in place, and then the headliner was re-attached from back to front. Most cars have an obvious starting point which should be apparent when you take down the headliner.)
Here's another example of a headliner, in this case a '55 Ford 4 door Town Sedan, with a specific place to start. This one had two wires that hooked over the last bow through the listing. That means I needed to stretch the headliner from back to front to install it. Here's the finished product.

If you're wondering what that is in the 2nd picture, it is a very powerful magnet that is in a cloth sleeve which I use to hold the headliner in place as I work. I have four of these magnets, and they work great. They are strong enough to hold a piece of 1/2" plywood to a car door, right through the plywood. I use them in dozens of different ways.

If you're wondering, yes, the rear window had to come out to install the rear of the headliner. That's a whole different story.
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