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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 01-20-2005, 02:33 PM
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this is instance super warm heat for a garage. you can get this in natural gas or propane. theres other brands than Mr. Heater. i use a ceiling mount electric heater 5000w (2nd link) i just added another one so i have 2 mounted to ceiling now. one did great till its zero or below zero, my ceiling and 2 walls are insulated and covered with particle board, and my overhead doors are insulated too. i only run one electric heater in 30 and above weather, my garage is 24x30 with 8' ceiling (the electric heaters are 240v). the 1st link is radiant heat witch warms the objects / floor in the room not the air. its super heat.
__________________________________________________


http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...=20858&R=20858


http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...ctId=595&R=595

this ones not bad but the 1st link ia a better heater.
http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/w...=25606&R=25606
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 11:26 AM
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Garage Heater Calculator

An easy way for anyone to determine what size heater they are going to need for their garage is to use this Garage Heater Calculator . Put in your garage's info, like dimensions and insulation, and it will tell you what size heater you will likely need.


I know this is an old thread, but hopefully this will answer some questions for people.



Mike
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 04:40 PM
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Great link, thanks. But I really like the way my garage (at 440 sq. ft.) is considered a 1 1/2 car garage. I've always told my wife the garage is too small....


In a while, Chet.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 07:37 PM
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check with local demolition companys and buy CHEAP....a used house furnace or overhead unit heater.....

natural gas is best.....if you want a gas furnace can be converted to propane by drilling out the orifice in the control valve larger.....

electric costs huge $$$$$$$$$$$ to run......

for your shop, if insulated good.....25,000 btu will be ok......

most small house furnaces are around 125,000 btu...you can use one no problem.....it will just heat the place up all the quicker....

my shop is 1,000 square feet with 10 foot ceiling...I am in northern canada wher it can get -40 below...I run 90,000 btu overhead unit heater....and it is as warm as I want.....but before I had a 45,000 btu unit and it could not keep up and the place was chilly mid winter....
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 08:29 PM
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Just an added thought I've got a 28 x28 x12 6 two car block garage with two 10x10 insulated doors , it sized up for a 45000 btu forced air unit which works fine if left on all the time . But thats not the case ,when it is in the 20s it takes about 4 to 6 hours to bring the bldg. up to temp ,so in the real world it could use at least double the 45000 btu unit
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 09:08 PM
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I just built a 24 x 34 garage, and had one of these 15ft 50,000 BTU natural gas (or propane) infra-red heaters in it.
Calcana Infrared

It's whisper quiet, doesn't blow the dust around, and just feels nice.
Judging by the amount of exhaust being vented and how seldom it runs after getting up to temperature ... I'm expecting it to be quite economical. I'll have to run it thru a whole winter in order to evaluate the costs ... as we are on the "budget" plan which is currently $140.00 / month for both the house 1168 sq ft and the garage 816(?) sq ft.

The garage is well insulated, and I keep the temp around 50F (+10C)
I'm about 1-1/2 hours south of "DustyRustee" in the "chinook belt" where it's not QUITE as cold (-35 is usually the coldest ... but we did see -50C with a wind chill for a day or two this past winter ... UGH!)
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 09:30 PM
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Those tube radiants work great and are cheap to run.....and not having dust blowing around .......and as a bonus they warm up the concrete floor real nice so your feet dont get cold...

on the downside....in extreme cold, if you open up the overhead door and the shop chills off, the heat recovery time is slow......

big buildings that use them around here as main heat and where the doors open and close a lot in winter usually put in some overhead unit furnaces for use as recovery heaters ony....in a personal use workshop where the door may open only once in a blue moon, recovery time may not be important..

also with radiants, adding some ceiling fans makes a huge difference in evening out the temperature thru the space.....
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 09:48 PM
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Good point on the ceiling fans Dusty...
I have a couple of them and hope that they will move some of the warmer air around and under the vehicles as well.

Radiant is nice when it can "see" you.

My garage pad is an "engineered" pad, which is 6" thick minimum, and about 18" around the perimiter. It's a whole lot of thermal mass, so I think the fans help with the recovery as well.
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 05-19-2008, 10:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 66GMC
Good point on the ceiling fans Dusty...
I have a couple of them and hope that they will move some of the warmer air around and under the vehicles as well.

Radiant is nice when it can "see" you.

My garage pad is an "engineered" pad, which is 6" thick minimum, and about 18" around the perimiter. It's a whole lot of thermal mass, so I think the fans help with the recovery as well.
GMC....they call them 'radiants' because they heat up all the objects and surfaces , including the floor.....and the warmed surfaces radiate the absorbed heat....

slow turning ceiling fans work great...remember, all heat rises....those fans force it down where it is needed.....and do even out the comfort of the space....and do it very well!! They are a MUST w/radiant heaters....

And yes, the fans will help a lot w/recovery......but given the nature of the heating source , keep your expectations inline.....

likely too late for you now??? but an inch of high density styrofoam insulation under the slab really keeps the heat in the slab well....and wards off frost heaving.....

but if in winter the heating system is on full time, the ground below floor will not freeze......and heave will be minimal...so will cracking.....

My floor is 12 inches thick.....I have a lot of very heavy machine tools .....tons of weight are in my shop....

also.....here its a good idea to get some saw cuts in the slab....cracks will terminate and not travel right across should they occur...
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2008, 11:41 AM
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Wood burning stove, love it!!!
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2008, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dustyrustee

... given the nature of the heating source , keep your expectations inline.....

likely too late for you now??? but an inch of high density styrofoam insulation under the slab really keeps the heat in the slab well....and wards off frost heaving.....

but if in winter the heating system is on full time, the ground below floor will not freeze......and heave will be minimal...so will cracking.....

...

also.....here its a good idea to get some saw cuts in the slab....cracks will terminate and not travel right across should they occur...
Yup, too late for ALL of the above ...
They poured the concrete on Halloween day (4 months behind schedule) and "finished" the job at the end of January.

"Finished" is a relative term, as the garage doors were in boxes, on the floor, and I had only blue poly tarps between the -50C (record-breaking lows) and the inside of the garage.
That is what I came home to, from Hawaii ... and the infra-red was running non-stop for how long?

Everything that could go wrong ... did.
I have what you might call "aggregate" surface in a lot of areas AND a lot of cracks.
I'm not overly happy with my contractor ... to say the very least.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 05-20-2008, 10:32 PM
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Bummer!!!!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 66GMC
Yup, too late for ALL of the above ...
They poured the concrete on Halloween day (4 months behind schedule) and "finished" the job at the end of January.

"Finished" is a relative term, as the garage doors were in boxes, on the floor, and I had only blue poly tarps between the -50C (record-breaking lows) and the inside of the garage.
That is what I came home to, from Hawaii ... and the infra-red was running non-stop for how long?

Everything that could go wrong ... did.
I have what you might call "aggregate" surface in a lot of areas AND a lot of cracks.
I'm not overly happy with my contractor ... to say the very least.
BUMMER 66........thank the "Alberta boom" for *******s like that contractor crawling up to the surface....

in a workshop a good flat floor is really important and I would venture a bet that it will eat at you every time you walk in the shop and look at it!

In your position here is what I would do (and yes, I went through the bad floor/contractor thing with my shopfloor)....

Here is what I did to fix bad floor job:

I raised the building 5 inches with jack all jacks and put some small blocks cut from 4 X 4 fence posts and placed them under the sill plates spaced around 4 foot apart all along the bldgs perimeter....and lowered the bldg to rest on the blocks...

then from the outside I fastened plywood strips to the bldg to act as outside forms and staked them into the ground....

then I went around where new construction sites where pours where being done and found the best concrete crew I could find....

I hired them and had them pour and finish a 5" additional topping on top of the bad floor......the height difference to the driveway I have lived with and it sucks! but the floor is great!

If your bldg is set on a grade beam and you floor is a floating slab, you can jackhammer it out and do a re-pour.....

then file a statement of claim w/small claims court and go after the contractor for the costs.....and try to re-coup....

big hassle yes!!!

but a lousy floor in a shop is nothing but a huge headache!!!!!
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2008, 10:08 AM
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I am in the process of building a new 24x30' garage. Demo is done, pad work to begin 1st week of July. I had already planned on foam insulation below pad to help with heat retention and currently weighing the choice of radiant vs. forced air heating. Any comments on either one will be appreciated.
Second question open for discussion is......the "Gas Company" first states "permanent structures" can NOT have a gas line running under it, OK...have them out to find out my options. Guess what?......three options, two involve running the gas UNDER the building ( they say the "regulations" are a bit of a grey area....lol). Third option, plumb the gas line inside the building........just sitting here wondering how bright an idea that would be with welding and such being done. maybe I'm missing something here but, does this option even sound correct let alone safe?
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2008, 01:21 PM
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tube type radiant heaters are cheap to run...no fan as well to blow dust around although a couple of slow turning ceiling fans are good to circulate heat.

dowside to radiants is heat recovery time on cold winter days if overhead door is opened and closed a lot.

radiants have to mounted high, I think minimum is 9 feet...if low, you'll bake under them.

an inch of blue roofmate insulation under slab, poly under insulation excellent and will help ward off cracks andfrost heave.

as for exposed gas lines....this is done all the time in commercial bldgs. and garages to pipe appliances....so no worries there....my gas enters at corner of shop, pipe runs to below ceiling and 20 feet over to unit heater...

my only closing advise is to build walls as high as you can....10 feet, not eight...juggle with truss pitch to allow high walls yet meet codes....and maybe consider cantilever style trusses to max out headroom in the event you may want to slip in a car hoist someday...
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 06-19-2008, 01:29 PM
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My garage has in floor radiant heat. tubes run through the concrete floor with water supplied by a water heater in my crawl space. This is fantastic. No pilot lights and no fan. I open the garage door in the winer and it warms right back up.
If I was building a garage its the only way I would heat it.
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