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-   -   Heater for Garage (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/heater-garage-54875.html)

18-FEVR 12-27-2004 05:02 AM

Heater for Garage
 
I want to get my garage comfortable to where I can work on my Nova with out freezing my you know what's off.

I looked at some of the garages you guy's have the pleasure of working in. They are awsome.

I have a one car garage 11' X 20'
ceiling height of 8'. Fully insulated. Can anybody recommend a stand alone heater
that would cover this area. Makes know differance to me whether its propane, electric or oil fired. I just want one that will do the job.

I have already shopped Home Depot and Lowe's. Those outfits don't know beans about how much area their heaters would cover.

Thank's for any input.

hedonite 12-27-2004 06:42 AM

Propane
 
I use a propane Readyheater style "salamander" with 70,000 BTU and it does a good job. I like the propane type better than the Kerosene type because there's less smell.

The best bet is to get an old wall furnace (ebay) that you can vent out of your garage. Even the propane fumes will get to you if it's not vented.

My father-in-law just installed a vented corn burner. It was quite a bit more expensive but it is awsome. He also heats his basement with it. Check Harbor Freight.

pmeisel 12-27-2004 07:11 AM

I would look at electric infrared, particularly if you have 220 available. Gets warm quick, you don't smell it, you turn it off when you don't need it. Try www.grainger.com among others for wide selection of sizes.

18-FEVR 12-27-2004 07:45 AM

Re: Propane
 
Quote:

Originally posted by hedonite
I use a propane Readyheater style "salamander" with 70,000 BTU and it does a good job. I like the propane type better than the Kerosene type because there's less smell.

The best bet is to get an old wall furnace (ebay) that you can vent out of your garage. Even the propane fumes will get to you if it's not vented.

My father-in-law just installed a vented corn burner. It was quite a bit more expensive but it is awsome. He also heats his basement with it. Check Harbor Freight.


Hey thank's for the quick feed back. I like the propane recomondation. I think it would
be cleaner burning.

We have a Harbor Freight here in KC
I'll check them out.

Thank's Again

cboy 12-27-2004 07:58 AM

18,

I'm no heating expert but my guess is you only need a unit that puts out 10-15,000 BTU - and possibly even a smaller unit might do it.

If you want to go the inexpensive route then hedonite's suggestion of a wall mount furnace (LP or Nat. Gas) would be a good choice. Just keep in mind that if you get a used one or a really low end unit you might have a burning pilot light at all times - thus you need to be a little more concerned when you have paint fumes or other flammable stuff open in you garage. Many of the newer units will have an electronic igniter rather than an open flame.

If you have more money to spend then the infrared electric unit is pretty slick. No noise, no flame etc. and most folks report they work very well in a garage situation. They will very likely be more expensive to operate as well since in most areas of the country electrical power is more expensive per BTU than LP or Nat gas.

Also keep in mind that you really don't need to heat a garage like you heat a house. I have my shop thermostat set at 57 degrees and that makes things plenty comfortable for working with a light jacket on.

Canadian Charlie 12-27-2004 08:39 AM

I think your best bet would be getting a propane heater or natural gas one. Always buy one a little bigger than you need it, you can always set the controlls down. With the cost of electricity these days I think when you get your next electricity bill the wife will kick you in the you know where

dinger 12-27-2004 09:21 AM

A fully insulated 11x20 garage should get by with the smaller heater as Cboy suggests. In most instances nat. gas is cheaper than propane, if that is an option. Definetely get a vented unit. Wire in a thermostat and you're set. Dan

tm454 12-27-2004 09:48 AM

Heat up the garage!!
 
I use a big old wood burning furnace...Two hands full of cut logs and I'm good to go then a log of two ever Hr or so and I'm at 70deg with two fans on to move the heat around. My space is 30'X40' with 91/2' ceilings and a second story.


Tazz


Rat Rods Rule!

pmeisel 12-27-2004 10:07 AM

Heating calculations
 
From www.mcmaster.com

1) Surface area of enclosure (total sq ft. of walls, floor, ceiling)
2) Heat loss factor. 25% well sealed and insulated, 75% sealed but not well insulated, 125% neither well sealed or insulated
3) desired change in temperature fahrenheit

Multiply for BTU/hr

In your case 936 sq ft x 25% x 40 degrees (pretty toasty) = a little over 9000 BTU

From another HVAC site if you are forced air heating and ventilating:

1) Cubic feet of enclosure
2) Air changes per minute
3) 1.08 (constant factor for energy to heat air and time)
4) desired change in temperature fahrenheit

Multiply for BTU/hr

Second formula more useful if you are painting, heating a public space that requires ventilation due to cooking, smoking, etc.

Hope this helps

hedonite 12-27-2004 10:27 AM

http://www.northerntool.com/catalog/...uides/heaters/

These are good calculations also. I do like the electric idea if you have 220. Check Northern Industrial too.

Size Your Heater!
Which model is right for you? Start by determining the following:

How large is the area being heated in cubic feet? Calculate area dimensions (Length x Width x Height) = Total Cubic Feet

What is the desired temperature increase to be gained by the heater? Calculate (Desired temperature(with Heater) - Area temperature(without heater)) = Desired Temperature Increase

Calculate the BTU's required to achieve desired temperature. Calculate ((Total Cubic Feet x .133) x Desired Temperature Increase) = BTU's Required

Gearhead forever 12-27-2004 11:09 AM

I bought a small 220V elec heater for my garage. It came with a wall hanging bracket and everything. I have a 15' x 21' garage which I insulated and drywalled. I covered the rollup door with 1" Styrofoam SM insulation. It keeps the garage warm with no problem at all. I leave it at its lowest setting which keeps the temperature at just above 0 (5-7 deg.) I opted for the electric over an open flame for safety. When I double the garage, I'll go with a gas ceiling mount heater, but leave the electric unit installed as backup.

adtkart 12-27-2004 05:57 PM

I just purchased one of the overhead electric heaters like shown in the ad for Northern on page 11. I used it with a kerosene topedo heater hooked to a thermostat a week ago to keep the stuff in my garage from freezing. My garage is 24 X 34 and isn't completely insulated (only half done with that), but does have drywall in the ceiling. I set the thermostat at 55 deg for the kero unit and let it run for a week. The kero heater only used about 1 gallon, and we had some pretty cold days/nights for us. I got a second electric heater for Christmas, and hooked it up (tough job, it plugs in). It was about 30 deg yesterday, and the temp in my garage was about 57 deg. If the place was completely insulated, and I covered the holes in the ceiling and around the AC unit, I am sure that they would heat it really well. I didn't get mine from Northern, they came from Lowes, at $50.00 each.

I don't know what it is going to cost me for this heat out there. I hope that the electric bill is such, that my wife feels it is cheaper to pay for the rest of the insulation and drywall. If not, I will get it done with the addition that I am getting ready to put on.

4 Jaw Chuck 12-27-2004 09:17 PM

I use a 220V-5000 watt electric heater in my 18X20 garage and it keeps it shirtsleeve warm even at -30C, and the roof isn't insulated yet. I also have a cheap ceiling fan to move the air around, keeps the heat near the floor where you need it.

Kevin45 12-28-2004 09:59 AM

Check out where they sell mobile homes. Quite a few times they take in older mobile homes on trade then strip them down to sell the frame, aluminum, etc. Many of these older ones that they strip will have wall mounted propane furnaces that would be ideal for a garage. I sold one awhile back for $50. It was 6 1/2' tall and about 18" wide and 1' deep. We ended up keeping the furnace out of our house for the garage when we had a new furnace installed, and I put that in my garage.

Kevin

38 special 12-28-2004 04:53 PM

Not to hijack, 18's thread but while we're on the heater issue, I bought a kerosene salamander type heater last year. It heats well but I heard it affects the metal on old cars somehow. Makes them harder to paint when it time to do that step. Is that true? I have mine in primer but don't want to make the painting process any harder next spring. I also have some bondo work to do on it before paint. May do some of that this winter if I get bored enough.


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