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-   -   Heating a cinderblock garage (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/heating-cinderblock-garage-80553.html)

workingclass 02-02-2006 12:48 AM

Heating a cinderblock garage
 
Just wondering if anyone had ideas about heating a 24x24 cinder block garage. Thinking about a wood burning stove and drywalling the ceiling and adding insulation but currently running a propane torpedo heater that just kicks out the fumes. I love wrenching on my ride but not gonna die for the cause. :drunk:

Neil Hochstedler 02-02-2006 03:54 AM

Not to mention propane is absurdly expensive now.

Yup, insulate and burn wood. I've heated exclusively with wood for 25 years and wouldn't heat any other way. I'm partial to cellulose fiber insulation, lots of it, but anything would help. Don't forget the vapor barrier between the drywall and the ceiling joists. And for added insulation, glue some styro to the outside walls and stucco over it. It'll help keep you nice and cool in the summer, too.

Meteor 02-02-2006 05:27 AM

Heating a cinderblock garage
 
When I built my garage I poured vermiculite into the block cavities before the roofing trusses went on. That stuff is a bit messey but it sure insulates the walls well. I used kb board on the ceiling instead of drywall (easier to work with plus added structural strenght to the roofing frame. Had 6" blown cellulose added above the ceiling.

I use a standard wood stove to heat the building (2400 sq ft with a 16' ceiling). If I burn it round the clock, it keeps the building around 50 degrees during periods of sub 30 degree weather outside.

Meteor

workingclass 02-02-2006 09:45 AM

Heating a cinderblock garage
 
Cool, I thought I was going in the right direction for once. :thumbup: By the way, what is KB board and roughly how much would it be to spray the cellulose and is it something I could myself? Thanks, you guys are great.

Z-Money Pit 02-02-2006 10:31 AM

I have the same size garage and utilize both methods that you have listed. I have the torpedo propane heater that I will use if I am only going to be out in the garage for a short period of time. Last winter I purchased a wood burning stove that I now use if I plan on spending a couple of hours in the garage. The stove works great but it takes a little time to get up to a good comfortable temperature.

1931 steve 02-02-2006 10:38 AM

I switched from a wood burning stove to a natural gas forced air with a T-stat. the wood stove was nice if you have the time to wait for the heat to rise. With the cost of wood, its not much difference from N Gas, I bought a new furnace for under $600.00 about 9 years ago and have used it ever since. I would do as the rest has suggested, insulate the walls the best you can, definitely insulate the ceiling. make sure your door seals are in good shape also. If you check around with any apartment building that have replace furnaces lately you may be able to pick up a used unit for cheap or free.

Steve :welcome:

workingclass 02-02-2006 10:46 AM

Re: Heating a cinderblock garage
 
I thought about heating the garage with natural gas also but I can get wood from work for free. Either way, I need to get started weatherproofing it in the spring so I don't have to spend all winter working on my house.LOL Not to mention possible layoffs at the shop. Would you recommend some kind of foam to attach to the garage door or anything else to put over it?

workingclass 02-02-2006 10:48 AM

Re: Heating a cinderblock garage
 
Just out of curiosity, how many members here have cinder block garages and would they rather have a wood one?

1931 steve 02-02-2006 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by workingclass
Would you recommend some kind of foam to attach to the garage door or anything else to put over it?

I would if its just the metal door, I would go to your local Home Depot and pick up some rigid insulation board (the pink or blue stuff) and fit it into the door panels of you door.
My grandpa had a cinder block garage with a dirt floor, he did heat it with a wood stove, but that was many years ago.
Hay I see your in Redford, I have a repair shop in Northville.

Steve :welcome:

workingclass 02-02-2006 12:14 PM

re: Heating a cinderblock garage
 
Hey Steve, where is your shop located-it looks really familiar? You need any part time help?LOL Also, you have some nice rides. :cool:

1931 steve 02-02-2006 01:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by workingclass
Hey Steve, where is your shop located-it looks really familiar? You need any part time help?LOL Also, you have some nice rides. :cool:

I am located at 7 Mile and Northville Road. I can assume you found my web site? May be looking for part time help in early spring. Look me up.

Steve :welcome:

home brew 02-02-2006 01:11 PM

Heating a cinderblock garage
 
If you are going to heat your shop with a wood stove or natural gas furnace try to supply it with a fresh air source to the firebox. No use sucking in cold air through the cracks around your doors and windows and using your already warm air to feed the fire. An insulated pipe to the front of your fire box will work. Make sure you have a flapper valve on the intake of the pipe which will close when your heating source is not in use. You could use one from a clothes dryer vent except install it backwards.
If you can find a natural gas furnace from a mobile home they have their warm air outlet on the bottom and it heats the floor area first before the heat rises; unlike a house furnace which has the warm air outlet at the top and you heat the ceiling first and then slowly the heat gets down to where you are working.

workingclass 02-02-2006 10:54 PM

Heating a cinderblock garage
 
Hey Home Brew- That trailer furnace sounds like a great idea, I have a friend that owes me some money that lives in one close by :mwink: lol.

Steve, I'm just off 7 mile between Inkster and Beech Daly. I will definitely hit you up come spring. Thanks

Fat Freddy 02-02-2006 11:35 PM

fat freddy
 
get a old mobile home furnace they run on oil or kerosene, they hat up fast and blow the heat aound. I use a wood stove cause i have woods to cut.
i use a propane for the initial blast of warm air. while the stove makes heat, and if ya can afford it insulate.
don't for get south facing windows help get 'er warm in the mornin' ya can get some cheap foil and foam insulation panels at home depot for about 10 bcuks a sheet with a 6.6 rating and the foil will spread the light and reflect the heat around.
I did my roof inside with it and i live where cold is cold, and the sheep don't sleep.

Neil Hochstedler 02-03-2006 05:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by workingclass
Cool, I thought I was going in the right direction for once. :thumbup: By the way, what is KB board and roughly how much would it be to spray the cellulose and is it something I could myself? Thanks, you guys are great.

You can definitely do it yourself. Check with whoever you're likely to buy the cellulose from- they often rent small blowers. Rental yards may have them, too. Should be around $10/day and you'll need it for a day. (BTW, cellulose spraying is a different and more complicated process for getting the insulation to stick to walls. You don't need it for your ceiling job. Just so you're asking for the right machine.)

You might also check around with local insulation companies- they buy their insulation at bulk prices and sometimes can sell it, installed, for less than you can buy it.


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