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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 09:30 AM
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mig tig stick ?

I am no expert on engines , but have been welding since 54 I have all three
types of machine ,but for heavy metal and the cheapest way to get the
job done is with a stick machine like the 225 amp buzzbox . Simple hookup
no gas required all position no problem . .6011 for rusted or pitted material and the 7014 gives a nice weld with easy start good for learning, all it takes is practice,on a frame it has to be done right. I have done dozen of frame jobs,steering boxs ripped out frames mostly on chrysler prod vans and PU.

Good luck on the project.

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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 04:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevymon
I should have said more difficlt. I have used the tig lying on my side with the foot control on the floor under my knee.

timothale said "I have had to buy the "Cheater lens " to put into my welding helmet"
I'll have to try the cheater lens. Was just afraid they wouldn't work.

Oldred said "The point is that MIG is used far more than TIG for body work"
Thats fine Red, I just think the options should be better explained because some guys want to do metal finishing and don't really know how much better the torch and tig is for that. No question that most just want it welded and mud over it.
Try the cheaters..you'll LOVE them..i'll even mail you a brand new one if you PM me your address for free,i get them daily at the nuclear plant i am currently working..let me know what size reading glasses you use and i'll get that size for you,i use a 1.75 or 2.00 depending on the position i'll be in...consider it an early christmas present......

I agree TIG is a much more maluable weld to hammer and dolly,but on auto panels like 1/4 panels..door skins..fenders with welded in framing/bracing etc where you can not get behind them to use the dolly,it makes things worse,so I want the very least warpage possible to deal with.
I never get porosity holes in the MIG wire doing anything,including the "tack n cool" method on thin panels until completely filled/welded with all tacks only and no beads to keep the heat down on the panel as much as possible.

I think most of the people who get the perosity in the panels with MIG is because they don't snip off the wire everytime they prepare for another tack or bead,that little black ball left on it causes perosity all the time in the start of a weld or tack,i watch way too many people just grab the gun and pull the trigger and never snip off a fresh wire to start with and wonder why they get perosity.
Thats a natural habit for me to start with fresh clean wire on MIG and Fluxcore...i'll even do it on TIG rod...and anytime i am takin a stick test i never use the same rod twice.It's just become a prevention habit for me over the years
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 05:11 PM
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so when i started this thread i hand even gotten as far as the first pic shows. then i rented the 185cfm compressor and the 300lb sand blaster and went to town rust busting and thats how the from looked when i was nearly done.

The second pic is from today after i went and picked up the 5th wheel hitch and set it up on the fram to ensure proper fit which it does as you can see at the end of the fram i marked with slashes in blue chalk that is the area i will be cutting off which is 4Inches past the crossmember, the plate that is on the rear will be re-attached or then again maybe not at all as it seems unnecessary, then behind the cab in blue chalk is the letters FT for fuel tank where i will be mounting 35-45 gal fuel tanks one on either side, then directly behind the fuel tanks i will be mounting 2 tool boxes one on either side. tomorrow im ordering a nice set of full fenders with built in tail lamps and i will be topping it off by closing the top of the frame before and after the 5th wheel hitch with diamond plate, just an upadate, and thanks everyone for all the posts im picking alot up.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 05:33 PM
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and this is the car im going to need to do some body work on luckily the 1/4s are good but behind the bumper is not so good and in the corners of the t top channels have small cancer holes that need filling thats where i thought the tig would do well
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 05:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuthnCustoms
Miller 180 wirefeed

Lincoln 180 ProMig

Hobart Handler 187(now the 190 models)

All THEE most popular and easiest to learn home welding machines and will do anything from light sheetmetal to 1/4" and a little more in a single pass with a bevel.
I agree completely. I have a Lincoln 175 I use for sheetmetal work and it is perfect (older model of the 180). I have a big Miller I use for heavier stuff, but the 175 just feels right when doing sheetmetal. I also have an ARC and have access to a TIG, the MIG is going to be the easy one to pick up and run with. I have also found the small .025" wire is the way to go on sheetmetal.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 06:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UPandComing
so when i started this thread i hand even gotten as far as the first pic shows. then i rented the 185cfm compressor and the 300lb sand blaster and went to town rust busting and thats how the from looked when i was nearly done.

The second pic is from today after i went and picked up the 5th wheel hitch and set it up on the fram to ensure proper fit which it does as you can see at the end of the fram i marked with slashes in blue chalk that is the area i will be cutting off which is 4Inches past the crossmember, the plate that is on the rear will be re-attached or then again maybe not at all as it seems unnecessary, then behind the cab in blue chalk is the letters FT for fuel tank where i will be mounting 35-45 gal fuel tanks one on either side, then directly behind the fuel tanks i will be mounting 2 tool boxes one on either side. tomorrow im ordering a nice set of full fenders with built in tail lamps and i will be topping it off by closing the top of the frame before and after the 5th wheel hitch with diamond plate, just an upadate, and thanks everyone for all the posts im picking alot up.
Looks like you will be carrying a light load in the trailer, and I guess you know what your front axle weight will be. You may have already considered it, but with the fifth wheel center of axle, it won't be adding any weight on your steer axle and you may need to with that long wheel base.
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 09-08-2011, 08:18 PM
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That truck used to be a stake body with a hide away ball, towing that trailer we hit a scale after getting 300 bails of hay from ohio after deducting the weight of the truck and trailer we had 35 k on the trailer, i kno i know lol way over loaded but the truck hauled it with no effort and stopped just as easily. Now that dot has become so strict over the past few years i wont be pushing any limits there no sense in taking risks. So for the time being i will be keeping withing my weight limits until i can turn a profit and invest in a heavier trailer. As for the placement the center of the king pin is slightly forward of the axel but i will not be mounting it im going to have a heavy truck shop mount it for liabilty reasons so they will set it in its final position to ensure proper placement and weight distribution. Hopefully this all works out well . If anyone is looking to have any shipping done im for hire once the truck is up and running
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 07:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobbieH
I agree completely. I have a Lincoln 175 I use for sheetmetal work and it is perfect (older model of the 180). I have a big Miller I use for heavier stuff, but the 175 just feels right when doing sheetmetal. I also have an ARC and have access to a TIG, the MIG is going to be the easy one to pick up and run with. I have also found the small .025" wire is the way to go on sheetmetal.
For those who don't know the capabilities of the tig, or are on the fence about buying one, here is an example of what you can do with it. I used three different panels to make one good original metal 1/4 panel. The weld area is the only thing that was ground, because I don't like grinding good metal away. Then stretched out using hammer and dolly. I burned through in couple spots, just drilled it out round and welded a plug in. If I could see bettter then I wouldn't add so much filler, and also may not burn through. The picture was taken after the panel was acid cleaned and scuffed for priming.







This is the inside







Wiped with reducer



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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 02:47 PM
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Hell yes go with mig, so versatile 200 0r 250 amp will do bout anything and small jobs, I personally love blue as in Miller but they are high but what isn't, lincoln is to, miller makes hobart and are very good machines those handlers are very hard to beat for a garage or shop if you find someone selling a 200 or 250x miller for a good price snag it you won't be sorry!
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Old 09-09-2011, 03:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 67fordboy
miller makes hobart


Here we go again, Miller DOES NOT MAKE Hobart!


Miller and Hobart are both owned by the same parent company, ITW, and as such even share some common "off the shelf" parts on some models but neither owns the other! They are two different entities within the same parent company and are competitors aimed at different segments of the market. The statement that Miller makes Hobart seems to imply that Hobart is just a scaled down Miller and that's just plain non-sense.


A look at the warranty site lists it as Hobart/Miller electric, kind of odd if Miller was the owner don't you think?


ITW the parent company of both Hobart and Miller also owns Bernard which makes the guns and some of the feed hardware which is shared by both brands on some models.

Last edited by oldred; 09-09-2011 at 04:00 PM.
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 05:00 PM
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.....Yea but Ford owns Cummins, right??? Ok thats also a myth, Oldred is 10000% on the money, Miller DOES NOT own Hobart......Illinois Tool Works owns both of them.

Last edited by 327NUT; 09-09-2011 at 05:14 PM.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 05:11 PM
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I'll start out by saying I am a self taught novice welder, but have owned and operated a few different units over the years. Some were the finest pieces of equipment money could buy. My TIG experience was limited until my son and I bought one about 6 months ago. I can do beautiful work after finally getting it set correctly. The computerized controls are eating my lunch. My son can set the controls, but flounders when it comes to putting the fire to the metal. My latest Mig is a big Thermal Arc Fabricator and will say it is the finest unit I have used. Price is right up there with the Miller, but in my opinion, it is a better machine and deserves looking at. My TIG unit is a combination TIG/ARC unit and is also Thermal Arc. The Arc function is also the easiest to use of all the units I have owned or operated.

But my advise to the OP is get the largest machine you can afford because as you get more experience, you will find yourself branching out and doing more and more with it. It is the pits to be restricted when you find the machine you bought for sheet metal is just not big enough.

Trees
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 05:21 PM
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This comes up sometimes over on Weld Talk and it usually gets shot down quickly. ITW is a big outfit and they not only own Hobart and Miller but some of the smaller outfits that make components. Hobart and Miller I suppose could be considered the same company if they are called different models of ITW welders but Miller no more owns Hobart than Chevrolet owns Cadillac! They are different companies and Miller is aimed at the industrial market while Hobart is aimed more at the farmer and small shop owner. When ITW bought out the welder division of Hobart Electric they halted production of the larger Hobart welders, that's why you don't see the large diesel Hobarts anymore or at least it's been a long time but I heard a rumor they may be produced again.
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Old 09-09-2011, 05:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trees
But my advise to the OP is get the largest machine you can afford because as you get more experience, you will find yourself branching out and doing more and more with it. It is the pits to be restricted when you find the machine you bought for sheet metal is just not big enough.Trees

Exactly, there's a lot of wisdom in the often quoted saying that you can turn down the heat on a big welder but you can't turn up the heat on a small one!
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 09-09-2011, 05:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timothale
sign up for welding tips and tricks.com Jody sends out a lot of good info each week. He does plug some of the stuff he sells and reviews other products he doesn't sell.
Was that a pun intended with "plug", or did you just work that in??
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