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Old 05-22-2011, 09:40 PM
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HF Compressor Question - Need Advice...

I have a 220v compressor rated at 24cfm, but the new place i am at doesn't have 220 and i need to make due with what is available atm...

So i am in the market for a 115v compressor... this is what i was looking at... I do body work, overalls, and just panel jobs etc etc...

What are your opinions on this compressor and do you think it could keep up? Was also thinking of adding an additional 30gal tank just for the usability.

http://www.harborfreight.com/2-hp-29...sor-68127.html

EDIT: Thought i should add... when i spray, my gun is normally at around 16-22 psi at the handle.

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Old 05-22-2011, 11:55 PM
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An extra 30 gallon tank is only going to overwork the compressor and heat it up. Not somthing I would do.. That compressor is pretty nice for a 120v, but if you can get ahold of the old 90234 compressor, it produced about the Same SCFM but was smaller and cheaper, and I'v used mine to paint a car. Runs constantly, but it keeps up.. 2 90234's manifolded togther running on 2 seperate circuits and you would be even better off, with about 11 SCFM
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Old 05-23-2011, 12:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt167
An extra 30 gallon tank is only going to overwork the compressor and heat it up. Not somthing I would do.. That compressor is pretty nice for a 120v, but if you can get ahold of the old 90234 compressor, it produced about the Same SCFM but was smaller and cheaper, and I'v used mine to paint a car. Runs constantly, but it keeps up.. 2 90234's manifolded togther running on 2 seperate circuits and you would be even better off, with about 11 SCFM
--- I really don't think i could deal with 1 oiless compressor along with 2 of them haha. it would be quite a ruckess.
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Old 05-23-2011, 12:46 AM
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90234 is oiled.. I wouldn't own an oil-less. There direct drive, so they do spin faster and can be loud tho.. Mine's in a diffrent building so it doesn't bother me..


The 'acceptability' of that compressor depends on what your gun requirements are. If it produces 7.3 SCFM at 40 PSI, then you may be ok with a gun that requires 11 SCFM or so at 20 PSI or somthing like that, but I don't think it would be optimal... My gun is the HVLP Campbell Hausfeld from Walmart and I spray at 50 PSI, and the compressor can maintain about 55 PSI while painting, so it is close

The other option is to bolt up a gas engine on your 220v compressor. You will need the air preassure throttle controls, and a few other things. But It should all work
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Old 05-23-2011, 06:30 AM
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Why not spend the money on installing 220V and use a real compressor that you already have? I don't see a 110V compressor keeping up with my air tools used in paint and body work.

Trees
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:43 AM
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These guys are right that compressor will not do the job and will only end up being a headache. Also Matt is right about adding that extra tank because at less than 6 CFM@90 PSI (and you can bet it will be a lot less with that 110 outfit despite it's rating) it will only make matters worse and will cause more problems than it will solve if it indeed solves anything. This has been covered many times and there is no point in doing it again but simply put adding the extra tank will not help and will almost certainly just make matters worse. Those little 110 outfits don't last long if used much and in a body shop setting they will wear out PDQ because of the constant demand, that one would produce less than 1/2 the usual accepted minimum of about 12 CFM needed for painting.
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldred
These guys are right that compressor will not do the job and will only end up being a headache. Also Matt is right about adding that extra tank because at less than 6 CFM@90 PSI (and you can bet it will be a lot less with that 110 outfit despite it's rating) it will only make matters worse and will cause more problems than it will solve if it indeed solves anything. This has been covered many times and there is no point in doing it again but simply put adding the extra tank will not help and will almost certainly just make matters worse. Those little 110 outfits don't last long if used much and in a body shop setting they will wear out PDQ because of the constant demand, that one would produce less than 1/2 the usual accepted minimum of about 12 CFM needed for painting.
--- According to gun specs, my gun is 9cfm at 30psi... But I spray in the low 20s to high teens. So I would only imagine my gun is lower that 9 cfm and that's to spray without waiting.

Biggest thing that annoys me with a crappier compressor is, always having to adjust my handle while in the middle of doing a job. Hard to keep certain things consistent.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trees
Why not spend the money on installing 220V and use a real compressor that you already have? I don't see a 110V compressor keeping up with my air tools used in paint and body work.

Trees
--- I am plenty capable of doing electric work, it's just simply not an option. If If I don't buy a 115 compressor... It's either work or don't work at the minute. I got really boned out of the place I was at.
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:57 AM
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Have you considered using two 110 volt compressors? You would need two dedicated circuits but that should be no problem.


Adding an extra tank does indeed help a lot, IF it has another pump and motor mounted on it!
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Old 05-23-2011, 01:51 PM
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Just another thought and because this has come up in the past. If you have seperate 110v circuits rated @ 25A with plugs 'within' reach, like 1 circuit per wall, you could create a T jumper and wire in for 220v that way. It will not be code, it shouldn't even be attempted but it would work in a pinch. The jumper wires would almost certinly need to be 2/10 Romex or heavier
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Old 05-23-2011, 05:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matt167
Just another thought and because this has come up in the past. If you have seperate 110v circuits rated @ 25A with plugs 'within' reach, like 1 circuit per wall, you could create a T jumper and wire in for 220v that way. It will not be code, it shouldn't even be attempted but it would work in a pinch. The jumper wires would almost certinly need to be 2/10 Romex or heavier
--- idk what to do, I hate having to spend money on an inferior product when I have a few thousand dollar compressor just sitting there.
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Old 05-24-2011, 01:40 PM
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Add a 220 v Circuit

I agree with trees, add a 220v circuit even if its just a temp circuit I put a receptacle next to my electrical panel and made a long extension cord from SO cord. I bought a small Harbor freight compressor after my POS craftsmen oi less blew up. I tried it the other day to shoot some epoxy primer it did the job but could barely keep up and I thought it too was going to blow up.
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Old 05-24-2011, 10:21 PM
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that will only work if you have a 240VAC service coming in and the 120VAC circuits are taken off the 2 separate legs of the 240 coming in. If that is the case I don't see why you wouldn't just drop a 240VAC breaker into the box and run a dedicated circuit, even a temporary one.
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Old 05-25-2011, 06:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverback
that will only work if you have a 240VAC service coming in and the 120VAC circuits are taken off the 2 separate legs of the 240 coming in. If that is the case I don't see why you wouldn't just drop a 240VAC breaker into the box and run a dedicated circuit, even a temporary one.
This makes no sense to me either, there must be 220v service somewhere to tap into, never heard of an electric company running a 120v single phase to building of any kind. Are you working out of a barn or garage or some building that someone only ran 120v to?

Regardless, it would make more sense to run 220v even if you had to hire an electrictian to do it for you.
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Old 05-25-2011, 06:54 AM
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I had a similar situation (in fact just a few days ago I had a thread about burying the wire) where I needed more power than just a single 110V line running to an out-building. It was no trouble at all to solve the problem, I simply installed another breaker in my shop ran the wire to the out-building and then into another small breaker box (actually an old fashioned fuse box that was already in there), made sure everything was properly grounded and the problem was solved.
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Old 05-25-2011, 07:12 AM
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I was in HF yesterday and just happened to take a quick look at their compressors as I would like to upgrade to a bigger version - quite frankly for you to use it as your sole air supply and do commercial work, it will probably not survive long.
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