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savman1 04-26-2005 10:16 AM

the history of chevy v8's
 
I finally found the info I wanted.




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Chevy Production Small Blocks
1953, Chevrolet introduces the Corvette with the 235 cid "Stovebolt 6" cylinder reworked to turn out 150 HP up from 115 HP. The renamed "Blue Flame Six" does not overly impress performance enthusiasts. Rumor is that Ford will introduce an overhead valve V8 in 1954 and a two seater in 1955 to compete with the Corvette. 1954, Ford introduces their overhead valve V8. Sales of the Corvette are languishing and market share is being lost to Ford. To keep up with Ford and try to save the Corvette from extinction Chevy rushes a V8 into development. Oldsmobile and Cadillac had introduced modern V8ís in 1949 and Buick followed in 1953. Only Chevrolet and Pontiac were holding back and Pontiac had been working on a V8 since the end of the war.

Under the direction of Ed Cole, the Chevy 265 cid V8 was rushed into production and was introduced in 1955 along with Pontiacís 287 cid entry into the market. The new engine had some initial teething problems but these were quickly resolved and the Chevy small block evolved into the most successful V8 engine of all time with over 16.5 million being produced in ten different displacements over the next forty years. It is still with us today as the 5.7 liter (350 cid) V8. It saved the Corvette from extinction and restored Chevy to its former dominance over Ford. Despite numerous design improvements over the years the engineís basic geometry and key dimensions have been maintained unchanged. This continuity has contributed to the interchangeability of parts and tremendous popularity of the small block amongst performance and other enthusiasts. The availability of original and aftermarket parts for the small block Chevy V8 is not equaled by any other engine.

The 265 in the 1955 Corvette was rated at 195 HP, a substantial improvement over the six cylinder. For 1956 maximum HP for the 265 was raised to 225 HP. In 1957 the 265 was bored out to 3.875" resulting in the venerable 283 cid engine. Horsepower available for the Corvette was raised to 283 HP with fuel injection. In 1962 the 283 was bored and stroked to produce the famous 327 cid engine. The 327 was available in the "fuely" Corvette with up to 360 HP. A stroked version of the 327 was introduced in 1967 giving 350 cid.

In 1967 the 302 cid V-8, made by installing a 283 crank in a 327 block (4.00 x 3.00 inch bore and stroke), was introduced for SCCA Trans Am competition. The 1967, 302, Z-28 had 2 bolt mains; later 302ís had 4 bolt mains. The crank was forged steel. The Z-28, 302 cid engine used Corvette L-79 big port heads, with 11:1 compression ratio, 2.0 inch intake valves and 1.6 inch exhaust valves. Solid lifters and 1.50:1 rockers provided 0.485 inch valve lift. Optional cams could be fitted. Standard intake was an aluminum tuned-runner manifold with 4 barrel, 780-800 cfm Holley. The engine was officially rated at 290 HP but produced closer to 360 HP. In 1968 the 327 was given a beefed up crankshaft with 2.45" mains and 2.10" crank journals. The same year the 307 was introduced which basically was a 283 block with a small main bearing 327 crankshaft 3.875" bore x 3.25" stroke. For 1970 the largest displacement small block of 400 cid was introduced with 4 bolt mains; in 1973 the 400 was reduced to 2 bolt mains. Because of the 400ís large bore of 4.125" and cylinder spacing of only 4.40" there is no water jacket between the cylinders at the center and the cylinders are referred to as "siamesed". Although production of the 400 was stopped in 1980 there is still great interest in the engine today due to its high displacement and low cost.

The small block V8 has a deck height (centerline of crankshaft to cylinder deck measured along the centerline of the bore) of 9.025" and a height (centerline of crankshaft to top of engine along the center of the V) of 9.805". Cylinders are spaced on 4.40" centers on each bank and the centers of cylinders on the two banks are offset to accommodate the two connecting rods on each crank journal. The small blocks have been produced in 3.671", 3.736", 3.750", 3.875", 4.000" and 4.125" bores and strokes of 3.00", 3.10", 3.25", 3.48", and 3.75". Crankshaft bearings have been produced in small 2.30", medium 2.45", and large 2.65" diameters with rod journals of 2.00" and 2.10".

The Gen.I and II smallblocks as we know them will be phased out over the next few years and replaced with the Gen.III motor. The Ď98 "LS1" motor found in Corvettes, Camaros and Pontiac Firebirds are the first of the new style smallblocks. The Gen.III will soon be found in trucks applications using a cast iron Gen.III block instead of the aluminum block found in the LS1ís.

Below is a table of the main dimensions for all production small block Chev engines from 1955 to 1998 and Generation II and later blocks.

Production Chevy Small Block V8ís

CID Years Bore Stroke Main Rod Actual Liters Main
bearing Bearing CID Bearing
265 55-56 3.750 3.00 2.30 2.00 265.1 4.34 2 bolt
283 57-67 3.875 3.00 2.30 2.00 283.0 4.64 2 bolt
327 62-67 4.000 3.25 2.30 2.00 326.7 5.35 2 bolt
302 67 4.000 3.00 2.30 2.00 301.6 4.94 2 bolt
350 67-94 4.000 3.48 2.45 2.10 349.8 5.73 2&4 bolt
302 68-69 4.000 3.00 2.45 2.10 301.6 4.94 4 bolt
327 68-69 4.000 3.25 2.45 2.10 326.7 5.35 2 bolt
307 68-73 3.875 3.25 2.45 2.10 306.6 5.02 2 bolt
400 70-72 4.125 3.75 2.65 2.10 400.9 6.57 4 bolt
400 73-80 4.125 3.75 2.65 2.10 400.9 6.57 2 bolt
262 75-76 3.671 3.10 2.45 2.10 262.5 4.30 2 bolt
305 76-94 3.736 3.48 2.45 2.10 305.2 5.00 2 bolt
267 79-81 3.500 3.48 2.45 2.10 267.9 4.39 2 bolt
All 1st generation small blocks used a 5.7Ē rod length except for the
400 cid engine which used a 5.565" rod length.
Firing order 1-8-4-3-6-5-7-2

Generation II and later
350 LT5-89 3.900 3.66 2.76 2.10 349.8 5.73
350 LT1-92 4.000 3.48 2.45 2.10 349.8 5.73
265 L99-94 3.740 3.00 2.45 2.10 263.7 4.32
350 LS1-97 3.900 3.62 2.558 2.10 346.0 5.67
293 LR4-99 3.780 3.27 293.6 4.81
364 LQ4-99 4.000 3.62 363.9 5.96
325 LM7-99 3.780 3.62 325.0 5.33

L99 is Gen. II 94 and later 4.3 liter
LT5 used from 89-95 in ZR1 Corvette
LT1 is Gen. II engine
LS1 is Gen. III engine 97 and later
LR4 99 and later 4.8 liter Vortec
LQ4 99 and later 6.0 liter Vortec
LM7 99 and later 5.3 liter Vortec



Chevy Production Big Blocks

The Chevy big block was introduced in 1965 with a 396 cid Mark IV engine developed from the 1963 Datona mystery engine. The engine was basically developed as an answer to the highly successful GTO with its 389 cid engine introduced in 1964. The 396 was first offered in the Chevelle at 375 HP, in the full size Chevy as 325 and 425 HP versions and in the Corvette with up to 425 HP. In 1966 the 396 was bored out to 4.250" producing a 427 cid engine. The 427 was offered in the 1967 Impala SS rated at 385 HP and in the Corvette it was first offered in 1966 and was uprated with 3-2 bbl carburetors to 435 HP for 1967.

In 1967 the L88 427 was also provided in approximately 20 Corvettes with an advertised HP of 430 but actually producing in excess of 550 HP. The L88 required minimum 95 octane gas to avoid possible damage to the engine and was meant to be strictly for racing. 1970 saw introduction of a stroked 427 resulting in a 454 cid engine. The 454 was offered in the 1970 Impala, Chevelle SS, El Camino SS and Monte Carlo SS in a 360 HP version and in the Chevelle and El Camino SS in a 450 HP version. The 1970 Corvette LS-6 was offered with the 390 HP 454 cid engine. 1970 also ushered in the 402 cid engine which was also known as the 396 in some Chevys and the big block 400 in others. In the 1970 Camaro SS, Chevelle SS and Nova SS the 402 cid engine with 375 HP was known as the 396 and the cars carried the 396 badge. From 1970 to 1972 the 402, 454, 465 and 495 cid engines were introduced.

The short big block V8 has a deck height (centerline of crankshaft to cylinder deck measured along the centerline of the bore) of 9.80" and a height (centerline of crankshaft to top of engine along the center of the V) of 10.75". Cylinders are spaced on 4.84" centers on each bank and the centers of cylinders on the two banks are offset to accommodate the two connecting rods on each crank journal. The big blocks have been produced in 3.935", 4.096", 4.125", 4.250", and 4.440" bores and strokes of 3.47", 3.76", and 4.00". Over the years from 1965 to 1995 the big blocks were offered in nine different displacements from 366 cid to 502 cid.

Below is a table of the main dimensions for all production big block Chev engines from 1965 to 1995.


Production Big Block V8ís

CID Years Bore Stroke Block Material Actual Liters Main
CID Bearing
396 65-69 4.096 3.76 Cast Iron 396.4 6.50 2&4 bolt
366T 66-95 3.935 3.76 Cast Iron 365.8 5.99 2&4 bolt
427 66-69 4.250 3.76 Cast Iron 426.7 6.99 2&4 bolt
427T 69-95 4.250 3.76 Cast Iron 426.7 6.99 4 bolt
427 69 4.250 3.76 Alum.w/liners 426.7 6.99 4 bolt
430 69 4.440 3.47 Alum.w/liners 429.8 7.04 4 bolt
454 70-91 4.250 4.00 Cast Iron 454.0 7.44 2&4 bolt
402 70-72 4.125 3.76 Cast Iron 402.0 6.59 2&4 bolt
465 70-71 4.440 3.76 Alum.w/liners 465.7 7.63 4 bolt
495 70-71 4.440 4.00 Alum.w/liners 495.5 8.12 4 bolt
495 72 4.440 4.00 Alum.no liners 495.5 8.12 4 bolt
502 92-94 4.466 4.00 Cast Iron 501.3 8.21 4 bolt

All big blocks have 2.75" main bearings and 2.20" rod bearings and all production big blocks used a 6.135" rod length. T is Tall (or long) block with a deck height of 10.20" and vertical height of 10.75".
Firing order 1-8-4-3-6-5-7-2


The other Chevy V8ís

How could we forget the legendary 409 cid engine first introduced in 1962. It evolved from another great engine the 348 cid V8 that ruled the road from 1958 to 1962. My 1961 Chevy had a 348 with the tri-power option putting out advertised 330 HP and with a 4.56 rear end it was unbeatable up to about 90 mph. The 348 was bored and stroked until it displaced 409 cubic inches. The 409 engine was pure muscle; full sized Chevys turned 12.55 quarter miles at 116 mph. The cam, valves, compression ratio of 10.2:1, head design and large dual exhausts all worked together to produce one of the most exciting engines in history. It was available in the Impala, but hot rodders in the know preferred their 409 in the lighter Bel Air body. The 409 was a great engine but Chevy needed something to answer the Chrysler 426 Max Wedge, the Ford 427 and the Pontiac Super Duty 421. In 1963 the 409 was stroked to 3.65" to produce 427 cid and along with liberal use of aluminum, special heads and intake manifold the Z11 engine/Impala was born. Officially rated at 430 HP, several sources suggest that actual output was significantly higher than 500 HP.

In January 1963, the GM brass passed down an edict to its divisions to stop any work going on with performance programs. Sadly, as a result, only 57 Z11ís were made. They were all T-10 four speed equipped Impala SS cars. However, the Z-11ís that made it to the racetrack cleaned up shop. The Strickler/Jenkins car won the eliminator bracket at the 1963 NHRA U.S. Nationals in Indianapolis, running a 12.10 second pass at a flying 120.16 mph.

Below is a table of the main dimensions for the "W" engines produced from 1958 to 1965.


"W" Family V8 Motors

CID Years Bore Stroke Block Material Actual Liters Main
CID Bearing
348 58-65 4.125 3.25 Cast Iron 347.5 5.69 4 bolt
409 62-65 4.312 3.50 Cast Iron 408.9 6.70 4 bolt
427 63 4.312 3.65 Aluminum 426.4 6.99 4 bolt

348 had 6.135" rod
409 had 6.000" rod
427 had 6.135" rod Z-11

ALL "W" family motors used 2.50" main bearings and 2.20" rod bearings



Non Production Chevy V8ís

Because of the interchangeability of parts in the Chevy small blocks several other displacements have been produced aftermarket for performance purposes. A 377 cid engine is produced using a 400 block bored 30 thou over and a 350 crankshaft. The 334 is a 305 block bored 0.030" over with a 400 crank and a 383 cid is a 350 block bored 0.030" over and a 400 crankshaft.

Following cool stuff on non stock chevy's is thanks to Paul Shufelt,
Guelph Ontario, by e-mail, Paul Has a 78 Nova 4 door with a "slightly modified"
406 what a sleeper!

Hey Bob,

For your non- production chevy small blocks area, I have a couple of more
combos that you might wish to post, the first is straight forward, but the
second one is a bit tricky.

1) Using a 400 block .030 over and a 327 (3.25") crank, you get a 353.
Some guys like to buzz 'em at high revs.

2) Another trick is to use a 400 .030 over, take the 400's crank, and have the rod
journals re-ground off-set from the crank centerline to a new 2.00" small journal size
from the standard 2.10". The additional +.10 result is a stroke of 3.85" from
3.75" from the good 'ole 400's nodular iron crank. The catch is that you use
the smaller journal rods from production small blocks, 5.7" rods-2.00"
journal. Using trick pistons, this combo gives you a stout 417 cubic inches!
Fun stuff.





Back to HOME Page


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poncho62 04-26-2005 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by savman1
IUnder the direction of Ed Cole, the Chevy 265 cid V8 was rushed into production


Not too bad a motor, for a "Rush" job, eh?

KNanthrup 04-26-2005 11:40 AM

Cool, ill add something I found along the way as well...

Quote:

HISTORY OF THE SMALL BLOCK CHEVY
The small-block was introduced in 1955 with 265ci. Unless you are restoring a car and want to be exact in every detail, the early 265 block is not one to use since it has no oil filter. During 1956 this was rectified and the engine continued in production until 1957.

In 1957, the engine size was stepped up to 283ci. This engine, with its 3.875in bore and 3.000in stroke, continued production until 1967. Up to about 1958 the small block Chevrolet used a rope type rear main seal, but from this point to the 1986 model the now familiar split neoprene seal was used.
In the 1962 model year the Corvette came out with 327ci. This was the first of the 4.000in bore motors, and set the stage for what was to become the most common bore size among small blocks. Equally note worthy is the fact that the stroke was increased to 3.250in. This necessitated larger counterweights and as a result, some substantial internal modifications had to be done to the 283 design to accommodate a crank shaft with larger counterweights.

In the 1968 model year when the 350 was introduced, blocks moved into the big journal crankshaft era and the 327 was produced both in small and big journal size. This means if you have a 327 big journal crank, you can make a 327 engine out of a 350. Later 327s from 19681969, when the engine was dropped, had bigger main bearing journals than earlier engines.
In 1968, the 307ci engine was introduced as a kind of economy engine. It had the 3.875in bore of the 283 and used a cast crank with the 3.250in stroke of the 327 and was produced up to 1973.
From 1967 to 1969, the 302 was produced, although it was probably developed just so Chevrolet had an engine size eligible for TansAm racing. In 1967, it was produced with the small journal crank and in 19681969, with the big journal crank.

The year 1967 also saw the introduction of the 350ci engine. This now classic configuration utilized a 4.000in bore with a 3.480in stroke, and has probably become the most common engine size. Along with the introduction of the 350 came the standardization on the big main journals.
The next major milestone in terms of performance was the introduction in 1970 of the 400ci block. This deviated from the standard format in many respects. First, it used a nominal 4.125in bore, as opposed to the 4.000in bore that had become the norm. To achieve the 4.125in bore, some internal casting core changes were necessary. The most obvious external change was the use of three freeze plugs in the side of the block. To accommodate this larger bore size, the bores were siamesed; there was no water between the cylinder bores because the barrels joined in the water jacket. In contrast, all other blocks have water completely surrounding each cylinder bore.

Along with this change in the bore size, the 400 motor was equipped with a 3.750in stroke cast crankshaft. To get this bore stroke combination within the confines of the standard 9.025in crankshaft center to block deck height it was necessary to shorten rod length if the stock piston ring package was to be retained. The standard 5.70in rod was then shortened to 5.56in.
In 1975, the 262ci engine was introduced with a 3.671in bore and a 3.100in stroke. It was intended as a low output economy engine but obviously did not prove popular as it was produced for only one year.

In 1976, the 305ci engine was introduced, which must be the most plentiful engine in existence, next to the 350. Built largely for emission and mileage reasons, this engine sports a 3.763in bore with the crankshaft stroke of the 350 at 3.480in. As of 1992, the 305 is still being produced and looks as if it will continue in production for some time.

In late 1979, a 267ci engine was introduced. This had a 3.500in bore along with the 3.480in stroke of the 350. Like the earlier 262, it was intended as an economy engine, both in terms of cost and fuel consumption. Again like the 262, it did not prove popular and was produced only through model year 1982.

As of 1983, only two displacements of small block were produced the 305 and 350. In 1986, a block design change was made concentrating on the rear main oil seal. Instead of having a split oil seal, the rear main bearing now used a full 360deg. one piece seal. Using this type of block usually requires using the relevant crank and flywheel, as a crankshaft design change was also made. If you have an early crank, Chevrolet has a special seal adaptor kit to convert 1986 and the late block to accept pre 1986 cranks.

A hydraulic roller version of this new block was also introduced at about the same time. The roller follower assembly is not interchangeable with later blocks. Unlike aftermarket rollers that are prevented from rotating by linking them in pairs, the General Motors roller setup has special slotted plates that locate lifters and keep the rollers aligned with the cam lobe.

TooMany2count 04-26-2005 01:19 PM

if ur going to tell the history of the Chevy V8 then lets tell ALL of it,from the 2nd paragraph here's a little more history on the Chevy V8 & 6's
Chevy's first V-8 engine was released in 1917. The 90-degree overhead-valve design debuted in the D-series, the last of the original long wheelbase cars. The eight-cylinder lasted only two years, as Chevrolet dropped these "large" power plants to develop four-cylinder versions. It would be 1929 before a six cylinder reappeared, and a V-8 wouldn't be available again until the introduction of the legendary small-block in 1955, 36 years later

savman1 04-27-2005 12:54 PM

Can you bore a 305 to a 350?

SAATR 04-27-2005 01:07 PM

No. It's impossible.

Rick WI 04-27-2005 01:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by savman1
Can you bore a 305 to a 350?

Yes you can, we have done both 305 and 307 blocks to 350's. Blocks are magged and sonic checked. I'd not suggest it though for the average rodder. We do this for circle track motors only.

savman1 04-28-2005 07:59 AM

I'm a dirtracker, and I have a cylinder boring machine. So your saying I can take the time it takes, and make a 305 a 350. According to the specs, they both have the same Rod and main size. The stroke is the same. A 350 bore is 4", and a 305 is 3.736". A 350 rod is 5.7, and a 305 is 5.0. So I guess If I bored .264" out of a standard bored 305, I could have a 350. Will someone please tell me if this is so.

lelandl 01-23-2007 08:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by savman1
I'm a dirtracker, and I have a cylinder boring machine. So your saying I can take the time it takes, and make a 305 a 350. According to the specs, they both have the same Rod and main size. The stroke is the same. A 350 bore is 4", and a 305 is 3.736". A 350 rod is 5.7, and a 305 is 5.0. So I guess If I bored .264" out of a standard bored 305, I could have a 350. Will someone please tell me if this is so.

No, you cannot bore a 305 to 350. You'd be lucky to get a block to bore over .060 let alone over .200.

Also, both 305 and 350 use 5.7 rods. We use the 305 X rod as an inexpensive performance rod in 350s. 400 is the only small block with short rods.

Hippie 01-24-2007 05:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TooMany2count
if ur going to tell the history of the Chevy V8 then lets tell ALL of it,from the 2nd paragraph here's a little more history on the Chevy V8 & 6's
Chevy's first V-8 engine was released in 1917. The 90-degree overhead-valve design debuted in the D-series, the last of the original long wheelbase cars. The eight-cylinder lasted only two years, as Chevrolet dropped these "large" power plants to develop four-cylinder versions. It would be 1929 before a six cylinder reappeared, and a V-8 wouldn't be available again until the introduction of the legendary small-block in 1955, 36 years later

They failed to mention the 1917 version was a TOTAL disaster! Possibly the worst engineered V-8 ever built until the Cadillac 4100............ :embarrass :pain:

grumpy1 04-08-2007 03:11 PM

I think I read years ago that the push rods were on the outside of the 1917 engine with a little oiler can sitting on the fire wall. Also the patent was sold to Ford after GM gave up on it. NOT real sure though, it was a long time ago.

Speedshift_Sam 07-27-2007 09:57 PM

More oddball chevy's
 
Anybody ever see the photgraph of the only protoype Chevy V-12? It appearantly was a pair of 292 truck 6 poppers, with one turned backwards, a custom crank and oilpan, and twelve Rochester 2gc carbs. Project was dropped shortly after it's conception in 1962.
Or how about the SOHC small block shunned by Henry "Smokey" Yunick in 1967?

redsdad 07-28-2007 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speedshift_Sam
Anybody ever see the photgraph of the only protoype Chevy V-12? It appearantly was a pair of 292 truck 6 poppers, with one turned backwards, a custom crank and oilpan, and twelve Rochester 2gc carbs. Project was dropped shortly after it's conception in 1962.
Or how about the SOHC small block shunned by Henry "Smokey" Yunick in 1967?

There's a photo of the production GMC V-12 in this thread: http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/snea...od-120725.html
Two GMC V-6's with a common block.

ChevelleSS_LS6 10-17-2007 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by grumpy1
I think I read years ago that the push rods were on the outside of the 1917 engine with a little oiler can sitting on the fire wall. Also the patent was sold to Ford after GM gave up on it. NOT real sure though, it was a long time ago.

pics would be VERY interesting with this engine.

redsdad 10-17-2007 09:46 PM

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DG

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DG

http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...%3Den%26sa%3DN


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