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Old 08-04-2004, 09:16 AM
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History Of Protective Coatings

Just for those who want information about protective coatings before applying a product to your vehicle:

BEES WAX - The earliest historical record of waxes being used as protective coatings comes from notes kept by the servants of the Royal Families of Europe. These records clearly show that even during the 1500's, servants prepared and applied bees wax to coaches of the Royal Families. Bees wax is sticky and yellowish in color.

NATURAL WAXES - Later, it was discovered that the waxes made as an outer covering for the leaves of plants, could be used in the place of bees wax. Since these waxes were more readily available than bees wax, wax manufacturers later chose natural waxes when commercially preparing products for automotive, boat and aircraft use. The major drawback of natural waxes is their low melting point. Since many of them melt at temperatures as low as 80 degrees F., they lose their bond and, as a result, offer little long-term restorative ability. Natural waxes are yellow in color.

PARAFFIN'S - Paraffin's are a low end derivative of crude oil and are manufactured in the process of refining crude oil to make gasoline and motor oil. They provide longer term restorative ability during the summer months because they have a higher melting point. Paraffins are widely used in making candles and canning jams and jellies. Paraffin's are slightly milky in color.

CARNAUBA WAX - In 1925, S.C. Johnson of Johnson's Wax in Racine, Wisconsin travelled to South America after hearing about a harder wax that came from the carnauba palm tree. He integrated this wax into many of his products and as a result became a world leader in the wax industry. It is currently used in more expensive waxes because of its limited availability and higher costs. Carnauba Wax is often blended with paraffin's to reduce the cost of production. It is slightly milky and yellow in color and produces a hazy film.

RUBBING COMPOUND - Rubbing compound, clay soil, is often added to waxes to remove oxidation.

SILICONES AND TEFLON - In the 1960's and 1970's, silicones and teflon were added to waxes to improve their shine or longevity since waxes last only a few months. Waxes make an adhesive bond like a band-aide and are easily removed by rubbing and washing.

POLYMERIC RESIN COATINGS - Most recently, a new line of products using crystal clear, hard, polymeric resins that bond molecularly to the surface to provide longer-term protection have been developed by a U.S.A. company. On site tests show how each application lasts up to three years or more. In addition, they remove oxidation through a unique chemical process without wearing away the underlying surface. Application time is dramatically reduced.

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Old 08-04-2004, 09:32 AM
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wow, lots of cool history there so i was compelled to add a reply. i have never waxed or polished any vehicle i have owned. if you saw them, you'd understand. lol. for my current truck i have ordered Imron Olive Drab for it. i dont know if Imron is used on actual military vehicles but i got the code from some american military site. but someday i will have a car that is shiney!




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Old 08-04-2004, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by goose
wow, lots of cool history there so i was compelled to add a reply.
Thank you. I've done a lot of research regarding protective coatings. I hope what I posted will be informative to others and educate them and give them the knowledge that they need to have before applying a product to their vehicle.

Now ...



Quote:
Originally posted by goose
i have never waxed or polished any vehicle i have owned. if you saw them, you'd understand.
I do not wax or polish a vehicle either! As you have read, most all waxes and polishes contain abrasives. I do not want any abrasive used on any vehicle I own!

I use a urethane polymer on my vehicles. It gives them an unbelievable shine, has the highest UV Block in the industry, bugs won't stick to it, removes oxidation, fights corrosion inhibitors, reduces water spotting, shines chrome, silver, MAG wheels, aluminum, etc. Also, it contains NO abrasives and I never have any swril marks. When using a urethane polymer, in essence, you are applying a clear coat to the finish of your vehicle. And the results I get from using the product I use, is quite spectacular.

Hopefully, one of these days, you'll shine up your trucks and other cars with a urethane polymer. The results you'll get will amaze you! And people will ask you about your vehicles, too!

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Old 08-04-2004, 11:55 AM
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That was excellent!
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Old 08-04-2004, 12:04 PM
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actually this is great info to pass on to my customers. can you apply this polymer with good old fashioned elbow grease or are you talking about some kind of buffer? to be more specific, how is it for helmits and gas tanks for motorcycles?
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Old 08-04-2004, 03:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by goose
actually this is great info to pass on to my customers. can you apply this polymer with good old fashioned elbow grease or are you talking about some kind of buffer? to be more specific, how is it for helmits and gas tanks for motorcycles?
What kind of business are you in?

How to apply the product that I use:

1. FORGET EVERYTHING YOU EVER KNEW ABOUT A WAX OR A POLISH! TAKE AN ERASER TO YOUR BRAIN AND ERASE EVERYTHING YOU'VE EVER KNOWN ABOUT A WAX OR A POLISH! You do not apply this product as you woud a wax or a polish!

2. Shake the bottle really well. Take a white terry cloth towel. Put a dime size amount onto the terry cloth towel. Then take the terry cloth towel where you applied the dime size amount and appy it directly to the surface. You wipe it in a circular motion until it disappears. About 15 seconds or so. You do small sections at a time - about a 10 x 10 inch sectionor a 12 x 12 inch section (that's on a car). It takes less than 30 minutes to do an entire vehicle.

3. And, Presto! You've got a great shine and the surface is protected!

4. No elbow grease required!

5. And you only have to apply it about every 18 to 24 months.

Yes, it is wonderful for motorcycles and helmets. I use it on my Harleys and also on my helmets. Bugs won't stick to it and it helps to repel water. Dust doesn't stick either. Takes off all oxidation and fights corrosion inhibitors. And, it leaves me with an unbelieveable shine! Plus, I never have any swirl marks 'cause there aren't any abrasives in it.

As I said earlier ... I've done a lot of research over the years and when I came across this product and have used it now for over 3 plus years, I will never use anything else.

Hope I answered your questions!

Quote:
Originally posted by BarryK
That was excellent!
Thank you, Barry! I appreciate your comments!
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Old 08-04-2004, 04:07 PM
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Whats the punch line? You do work for the co. that you are referring to don't you.

Is this secret product paint shop safe?

Troy

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Old 08-04-2004, 04:51 PM
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i airbrush for a living, occasionally i have to deal with a speck of dust and i polish that out no problem, but sometimes people come back to me asking for ways to restore the shine to their helmits or whatever. i have to laugh because i swear some of them are using steel wool or something and god knows what product. some are so bad that i re-clear the item for them the next season.
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Old 08-04-2004, 09:38 PM
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Troy: There is no punch line. And, no, I do not work for the company that manufactures the product that I use. I've posted what product I use on other posts and have no reason not to disclose the product.

And, yes, it is paint shop safe. There is no reason why it shouldn't be. Many paint shops use the product.

The product that I use is Rod & Custom Show Gloss Creme. It is purchased through a Distributor.

However, I posted this thread to provide information and give people some knowledge of the differences between waxes, polishes and polymers.

***********************************************

Goose: I truly understand what you are saying! Individuals do not truly realize what is in the products they are using. They do not take the time to read the labels or inquire of the manufacturer as to what is actually in the product, especially abrasives or silicones. I just know what I prefer to use and it is a urethane polymer as I like the shine and the protection it provides to my vehicles.
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Old 08-04-2004, 09:50 PM
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thanks, i will look into this then. my helmit has lost a bit of luster over the years and could use some tlc. still, i loved the history lesson. it actually reminded me of a time a guy bought me a helmit to fix. to give it a shine he took furniture varnish and rubbed it on his helmit with a rag and actually was quite proud of himself. the irony was he had a brand new beautiful Harley and this is how he drove around with it.
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Old 08-04-2004, 09:53 PM
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Awwww, I kinda feel for the guy! He was probably quite proud of his "shiny" helmet.

What do you do for a living? Do you own a cycle shop?
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Old 08-04-2004, 10:06 PM
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i airbrush in my home in my little shop. what ever fits through the door- i paint it. i joined this site because i started to weld a few years ago and finally got some tools i always wanted to work on my Project Putt Putt ('86 mustang). except for body work and painting its all new to me. sometimes i think the learning part is more fun then the actual work. but one thing is for sure, people always come to me asking how to get that perfect shine and walk away when i say that it involves some kind of energy on their part. lol.
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Old 08-04-2004, 10:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by goose
i airbrush in my home in my little shop ... i think the learning part is more fun then the actual work. but one thing is for sure, people always come to me asking how to get that perfect shine and walk away when i say that it involves some kind of energy on their part. lol.
I am sure you do a beautiful job. Airbrushing requires such a steady hand and you have to be a true artist to do that!!!

I agree with your comment about learning -- it is a lot of fun. I enjoy the "learning" more than the "work" part, just like you do!

And as it relates to your clients coming to you wanting that "perfect shine", the product I use doesn't really require a lot of energy or "elbow grease" on anyone's part. I got tired of doing all that work to make a car shine and then end up with those darn swirl marks all over my cars. Thats when I decided to do some research and educate myself in the field of protective coatings. And now, I am asked to give workshops and seminars at shows on the types of protective coatings and how to detail a vehicle. I've done my homework and it has paid off for me. The result: My cars shine beautifully and I don't have to do anything to them for over 2 years except dust them and sometimes wash them. It's easy!
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Old 08-05-2004, 05:29 PM
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Paint shop safe means, can you paint over it, like some of the other products that leave no swirl marks.

How about posting some pictures of some of your shiny cars, so we can compare them with ours.

Troy

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Old 08-05-2004, 05:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by troy-curt
Paint shop safe means, can you paint over it, like some of the other products that leave no swirl marks.

Troy
As with any paint, you want a clean surface. I wouldn't shoot a coat of paint over a dirty car or a car that had waxes or polishes on its finish. I wouldn't shoot paint on a car that had polymers on it either. I'd use Dupont's Prep Sol and remove anything on the finish first. Also, I wouldn't paint on top of paint. If I am going to paint a car, I prefer to do it correctly and do it right the first time. That way, I'm not going to have problems down the road. A little common sense can go a long way!

The product I use, Rod & Custom, does not leave any swirl marks at all. Swirl marks are scratches in the surface of the finish. And scratches are caused by abrasives. Rod & Custom doesn't have any abrasives in the product; therefore, never will there be any swirl marks nor will there be any scratches from applying it to the surface of the vehicle.
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