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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 05-09-2006, 07:51 PM
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I took an old leaf blower and made a welding cart.
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 05-09-2006, 10:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aminga
I took an old leaf blower and made a welding cart.
Is that the remnants of the leaf blower in the back under the gas bottle?, with the tall handle?
mikey
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 05-10-2006, 07:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by powerrodsmike
Is that the remnants of the leaf blower in the back under the gas bottle?, with the tall handle?
mikey
Yup. The angled uprights form the frame to hold the gas bottle. A chain keeps it from falling out the back. SO really it's only the handle and wheels I used. I've since cut the handle and pushed it more upright so it will take less space in the garage when I store it. I think when I get time I'll add a junction box to the frame. The firepower welder has a short cord. I can put a longer extension cord on the cart and push it around.


Another item, no picutres is a moveable stand for my chopsaw so I can roll it out in the center of the garage and not burn a hole in the wall (again).

Alan.
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  #34 (permalink)  
Old 05-12-2006, 12:16 AM
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I got a great one...

You take an ordinary 4" extension for your 3/8" ratchet, then get an old (or new) shock bushing and stretch it over the big end of the extension. Viola! It's a useful tool for all those bolts that are too tight to spin by hand and too loose to use a ratchet on. (you know, like every bolt you ever turned.)

Try this, you'll love it.
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 05-12-2006, 05:40 AM
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here are a couple of picture of my car dollies I made, found the wheels in a garage sale for 25 cents each bought the whole bucket of them, they look like they were cut off of floor jacks.






still need to make a couple more and many more tools.
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 05-12-2006, 07:58 AM
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Loyter, That's one of those things that leaves me scratching my head and thinking "now why didn't I think of that?" Great tip!
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  #37 (permalink)  
Old 05-21-2006, 01:23 AM
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here we go i made this, it has no purpose, but it looks aggressive
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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 05-21-2006, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by njbloodline666
here we go i made this, it has no purpose, but it looks aggressive
Looks like just the tool for pealing old roofing off!
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  #39 (permalink)  
Old 05-21-2006, 06:48 AM
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No pics of this one but I made a cylinder puller last summer when I rebuilt the engine on my Ferguson tractor. I needed to pull the cylinder sleeves from the engine block. Three of the four were the original 1951 sleeves. I used a piece of 3/8" X 2" flat stock a few nuts and some 3/4" all thread to make the tool. Cost about $15 to make but I had the sleeves out in about 20 minutes with no problems.

I cut the flat stock into two pieces, one just as big as the bottom of the cyclinder sleeve, rounded to match the diameter of the sleeve, with the outer edges ground down about 3/16" to center it into the bottom of the sleeve. The other piece was about 2 inches wider than the top of the cylinder sleeve. I drilled a hole through the center of both pieces to run the all thread though, and welded a nut on the bottom piece for the all thread.

I used two pieces of 1" square tube to rest the top piece on when pulling a sleeve, along with an old roller bearing from a lawn mower pulley and another nut to apply pressure. The bottom piece would be centered on the bottom of the sleeve, all thread threaded onto it. The top piece would slide down over the all thread and rest on the pieces of square tube. The roller bearing went over the all thread and then the top nut. Take a wrench to the top nut and start to tighten, and the sleeve would be pulled from the block.

This isn't much use on a modern engine, except maybe a diesel with cylinder sleeves. It did work very nicely and saved a lot of frustration.

-Joe
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  #40 (permalink)  
Old 05-31-2006, 10:53 AM
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Made other things, but this just happens to be on this pc. Made this years ago, when steel was cheaper. Didn't care for the store bought cheapie hoists. Can pull a motor/trans combo from front or side. Plenty of height and no trouble getting under lower vehicles. Stores in 3 pieces.
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  #41 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2006, 01:14 AM
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Heres my welding cart.


And my english wheel.


I also built a beater bag, and some tucking forks.
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  #42 (permalink)  
Old 07-25-2006, 03:12 AM
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Well, I made my welding cart and a sandblasting cabinet (no pics), but the handiest thing I made has to be my rotisserie. It was very simple and only cost around $75 in steel a couple of years ago, before steel started skyrocketing in price lol.
Thats my blasting cabinet behind the Firebird.
Then, when I was ready to take it off the rotisserie, I took the rotisserie stands, cut on em a little, welded em together, and VOILA!...instant roll-around car-stands

Actually, the rotisserie ends only made the rear stand...I used some scrap tubing to make the front one. But they work nicely for holding the car and being able to push it around while I re-assemble the suspension and paint it, etc.
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  #43 (permalink)  
Old 07-26-2006, 08:42 PM
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I've got the ultimate welding cart! It was FREE, except for about an hours' labor. Check out my project journal. It's the shiz-nit!

BigJoe!
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  #44 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2012, 07:35 AM
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I made this MIG cart out of an old shopping cart. Cost for old cart = $5.00. If you buy a MiG, making a cart is a good first project. The basket holds extra wire, gloves, etc. The white power strip didn't work too well and has been removed. Larger wheels would be a good deal. The small wheels have trouble going over small stuff on the floor. The wire securing the bottles was replaced by chain. NEVER leave a bottle unsecured where it might fall over and hurt someone or something.
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  #45 (permalink)  
Old 01-03-2012, 08:06 AM
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I really like your hose holder. I need to do something like that for mine. I believe wrapping them too tight can lead to breaks in the lining and gun so I wrap them as loose as possible. But when hanging over the hook on the side of my machine it still ends up being too tight. I need to make something like yours.

I think you need to get those plastic bags out of your cart, that is a fire hazard with the sparks that can be flying around when you weld you are asking for it.

Brian
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