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Old 01-23-2007, 09:04 PM
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Hooking up air line to compressor

I need to know how I should go about hooking up air line to compressor. My compressor just has a threaded hole on side of it. I think Ill just get a short tube to water trap/filter and then just plug rubber hose right into that. I do not need fancy metal piping all over garage. Here's my compressor
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...HFV&lpage=none

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Old 01-23-2007, 09:39 PM
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Put a globe valve in the tank so you can shut it tightly when finished using it. That way you can hold the pressure and not have to recharge it every time you use it. If you let the hose and quick disconnects ride the line pressure, they always leak and you either lose the pressure in the tank if you shut off your compressor or the compressor comes on a lot to keep it charged if you leave the motor on. All downstream stuff leaks even if it ever so slightly. Valve in tank, quick disconnects on all hose ends from the valve in tank to all your air tools.
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Old 01-24-2007, 06:06 AM
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my grandpa's is a craftsman but idk the tank size or peak pressure.. all iknow is when we built our shop he put all the air lines on top of the supporting rails and just T'd it off and down to reachable level with a quick connect...

PLAN AHEAD.. you may think you will only need 2 connets but put 4 just in case because you may not need it now.. but you eventaully will.. we put 5 in our shop and we use them all.. but unfortunatly there isnt one on the outside wall near my VW...

-Cam
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Old 01-24-2007, 07:05 AM
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First off, that is exactly the compressor I have in my shop. I originally had a Craftsman oilless. I'm just a hobby kinda guy, don't use my compressor every weekend. The Craftsman needed rebuilt after3 years. A year later it blew up (broke a connecting rod in 3 pieces) while I was paint primer on a car. I went to Lowes and bought this unit. I'm on my third one in less than 3 years. When you call the number in your book, they will refer you to the manufacturer. The manufacturer arranged with the Lowes store to replace it for me the day I called, so I could finish my project. I did appreciate not having to wait for a new motor, but, be aware.......there are problems. Keep your manual and receipt handy.

I've plumbed my garage with seven outlets inside, and two outside. You'll find it handy to have many outlets. I connected the compressor to my supply lines with a braided hose that actually came from the plumbing dept at Lowes. This allows for the gentle vibration of the compressor (even though it is bolted to the concrete at the base.) Each down line has a quick connect for the hose, and just below that, a ball valve for draining. I put a 90 degree fitting in the base of the tank, and plumbed out beyond the bottom of the tank, to a ball valve, to be able to drain the tank after each use. I poured a slab outside the garage and built a "closet or shed" type structure with 30x30 louver slabs mounted on two sides for ventilation. This saves shop space and cuts way down on the noise in the shop.

Hope this gives you some ideas for your shop. If i didn't explain it well, or if you've got other questions, let me know.

Bill
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Old 01-24-2007, 09:21 AM
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You do not need "fancy" plumbing all over the garage? Maybe not but when you get water trickling out of your air tools or even worse in your paint if that is what you are doing that piping may seem more than just "fancy". That water trap will do next to nothing if it is located that close to the tank so you will most likely have water problems unless you are lucky enough to have VERY low humidity in the air around the compressor or you just don't use the compressor enough to heat up the air, painting a car with that set-up would be risky to say the least.
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Old 01-24-2007, 07:31 PM
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Mitmaks,
You're definitely going to want to run pipe for the reason Oldred mentioned. I plugged a 100' airline directly into my compressor when I first got it & had water coming out of it everytime I used it. Once I ran 45' of 1" black pipe & put the regulator/filter at the end this problem completely stopped. At the time I did this I didn't have any air tools, just air chuck & blow gun so nothing was ruined. When I switched everything over from type M to HVLP fittings I found one of the original type M's all corroded on the inside from the water in the line during this period of less than a month. I didn't have to get the compressor hot to get water in the lines, I got it after the initial pumpup ( it was real humid at the time )
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Old 01-24-2007, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by busterwivell
First off, that is exactly the compressor I have in my shop. I originally had a Craftsman oilless. I'm just a hobby kinda guy, don't use my compressor every weekend. The Craftsman needed rebuilt after3 years. A year later it blew up (broke a connecting rod in 3 pieces) while I was paint primer on a car. I went to Lowes and bought this unit. I'm on my third one in less than 3 years. When you call the number in your book, they will refer you to the manufacturer. The manufacturer arranged with the Lowes store to replace it for me the day I called, so I could finish my project. I did appreciate not having to wait for a new motor, but, be aware.......there are problems. Keep your manual and receipt handy.

I've plumbed my garage with seven outlets inside, and two outside. You'll find it handy to have many outlets. I connected the compressor to my supply lines with a braided hose that actually came from the plumbing dept at Lowes. This allows for the gentle vibration of the compressor (even though it is bolted to the concrete at the base.) Each down line has a quick connect for the hose, and just below that, a ball valve for draining. I put a 90 degree fitting in the base of the tank, and plumbed out beyond the bottom of the tank, to a ball valve, to be able to drain the tank after each use. I poured a slab outside the garage and built a "closet or shed" type structure with 30x30 louver slabs mounted on two sides for ventilation. This saves shop space and cuts way down on the noise in the shop.

Hope this gives you some ideas for your shop. If i didn't explain it well, or if you've got other questions, let me know.

Bill
So you're saying this compressor isn't that great?
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Old 01-24-2007, 09:55 PM
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do I put in ball valve in bigger hole on the side of the tank? What about this smaller plugged off hole, what's it for?
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Old 01-25-2007, 10:09 AM
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Attach the shut-off valve to the tank so that it will shut off pressure to the entire air line then run the line as far as you can before attaching the separator/regulator because the seperator will not work very well at all if it is attached to the tank. You really should consider running some hard line from the tank to the regulator, simply attaching a rubber hose to a regulator mounted on the tank is a REALLY bad idea and will cause big problems with your air tools and can cost you a LOT of money if you ruin paint by getting water in it. You will have people tell you that they do it with no problems but they are either dreaming or have just been plain lucky so far. After servicing air systems for many years I have seen this tried many times and I can assure you it will be nothing but trouble even if it seems to work ok at first. When your impact wrench fails due to the moist air, your sandblaster stays clogged up, your paint is ruined from water droplets, your sander blows water all over your work, etc, etc then you will see what I mean.



Just a safety note here, it may seem like it is just plain common sense to not remove a plug on the tank without bleeding the pressure first but it is suprising how often this happens NEVER, NEVER, and I mean NEVER! trust the drain plug on the bottom of the tank to compeletely drain the pressure from the tank! This thing can and often does become pluged with crud and will stop leaking air with some pressure still in the tank and this has led to many accidents. It only takes a few PSI to cause serious problems when removing plugs on the tank or working on the pump. Taking the head off the pump with even low pressure still in the tank can get you hurt and if the pressure is above about 20-30 PSI it could kill you!
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Old 01-25-2007, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitmaks
So you're saying this compressor isn't that great?
The first one I got, the shaft off the electric motor to the pulley sheared off flush with the motor, in 4 months. The replacement blew a head gasket on the compressor, would run all the time, not build up air in the tank.....and I was in the middle of the project. I'm not necessarily saying it isn't great, just saying I've had trouble with mine (twice). I hope you don't have any problems.
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Old 01-25-2007, 10:16 AM
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Those motors are also notorious for blowing up start capacitors.
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Old 01-26-2007, 12:39 AM
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Ill just hook up 20' or so of air line to compressor and at the end of it an air dryer. After dryer I'll run another 10' 15' of air line. That's going to work?
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Old 01-26-2007, 08:02 AM
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20' of rubber hose is not going to cool very well and probably would not help at all. If you are cramped for space you might consider some type of cooler which could be located close to the tank. There have been several discussions here about this (even now, see the thread "condenser") that have covered some ideas that should work ok and these involve little effort or expense. The idea is simple you need only run the air through a heat exchanger of some type such as an AC core with sufficient flow capacity that has a fan moving air through it. There are a few things to consider such as watching for low spots that would collect water that could not be drained but this is just a matter of positioning things right. Air coming from a compressor tank will be hot if the compressor is trying to keep up with a tool and because of this the water contained in the air (humidity) will remain in a vapor form that is very hard to remove and that is why a separator will not work well close to the tank, the vapor will pass right through it. As the air travels along the air line it will cool allowing the warm vapor to condense on the walls of the line and if the line is attached directly to the tank this liquid water will have nowhere to go except out the end of the hose and right into whatever tool is attached. If you can cool the air and condense this vapor somewhere between the tank and separator then the separator will work much better at collecting the liquid so it can be drained and not enter the air line. A well designed piping system will work even better because it will condense the vapor and even collect a lot of the water so that it can be drained before it even reaches the separator. That piping system is far more than just a convenient place to hook up air lines it is a vital part of the system and should be included if possible. I know this is not always practical due to expense, room or maybe the set-up is not going to be permanent and in these cases the cooler system mentioned, or something similar, can be a good alternative but do yourself a BIG favor and use something.
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Old 01-27-2007, 06:12 PM
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I went ahead and got adapter/ball valve for compressor. I need to figure out if I should go with 3/4 or 3/8 line. I noticed there was this reinforced clear rubber line at Lowes for like $.60c ft. Then there was GoodYear rubber line, more expensive.
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Old 01-27-2007, 09:09 PM
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Go with 3/4". Friction losses can be high using small lines w/ high volume tools and spray guns. The clear plastic stuff is junk. Don't use it for low pressure air or water let alone high pressure. Buy the good stuff.
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