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  #61 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 07:57 AM
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I think a good example of Dave's post for the car world would be "maaco" or "all-pro" (just two of the BIG paint and body companies near by). They probably do take some business away from myself and other small shops around the area because they offer a $500 complete paint job. I can't cover the materials cost for that usually, so of course I cannot compete with their pricing. BUT I can offer a better quality repair for a little more money. Quality product at a reasonable price will usually win most people's business over a cheap product at a cheap price. I couldn't begin to tell you the number of people that have had work done at the "cheap" places and came to me because they were not happy with the job and could not get anything changed on the repair at the BIG shop because they signed a contract saying the big company was not responsible for (runs, sags, debris in the paint, bubbling, peeling, defective workmanship, faulty preparation.......) that is verbatim off of one of the big companies contracts!!!!! I sand and buff every paint job and even though I am a little more expensive I provide a quality product at a reasonable price, in turn I have plenty of work. People will talk about a great repair or paint job only until another one comes by, but a bad repair or job will get talked about forever. I stand behind my work and I refuse to lower my standards or quality to play a pricing war. I don't buy much from the big chains because the product quality is usually compromised for low price. I work hard for my money and I try to spend it on quality products. Good day all.

Kelly

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Old 03-17-2013, 08:11 AM
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what do you do

And that is how you're supposed to do business. My dad always told me that " you get what you pay for". Quality isn't cheap! In the long run it seems to cost less to do it right the first time. I've been to Maaco...it was a disaster! Especially if you've poured a fortune into a classic car, why would you do anything less then a fine finish by a reputable painter with quality products.
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
I think a good example of Dave's post for the car world would be "maaco" or "all-pro" (just two of the BIG paint and body companies near by). They probably do take some business away from myself and other small shops around the area because they offer a $500 complete paint job. I can't cover the materials cost for that usually, so of course I cannot compete with their pricing. BUT I can offer a better quality repair for a little more money. Quality product at a reasonable price will usually win most people's business over a cheap product at a cheap price. I couldn't begin to tell you the number of people that have had work done at the "cheap" places and came to me because they were not happy with the job and could not get anything changed on the repair at the BIG shop because they signed a contract saying the big company was not responsible for (runs, sags, debris in the paint, bubbling, peeling, defective workmanship, faulty preparation.......) that is verbatim off of one of the big companies contracts!!!!! I sand and buff every paint job and even though I am a little more expensive I provide a quality product at a reasonable price, in turn I have plenty of work. People will talk about a great repair or paint job only until another one comes by, but a bad repair or job will get talked about forever. I stand behind my work and I refuse to lower my standards or quality to play a pricing war. I don't buy much from the big chains because the product quality is usually compromised for low price. I work hard for my money and I try to spend it on quality products. Good day all.

Kelly
What it still all boils down to is Buyers Choice. If the buyer didn't want to shop at the big guys store they wouldn't exist. How you spend your money is entirely up to you. Sometimes it takes a little "education" to learn how to spend your money wisely. Don't complain about the paint run if you signed a contract that specifically stated the the big guy wasn't responsible. You agreed to except that run before the job was started. If you didn't want that run them you had the option to find someone who would agree to your expectations. Buyers choice. Don't like cheap products, don't buy from Walmart. Buyers choice. Walmart didn't try to invoke Imminent Domain in Calhoun GA. They approached Calhoun GA.'s government asking to build on that parcel of land and Calhoun GA. forced the sale of that land under Imminent Domain for the " betterment of the community" Walmart might have suggested it but it was the duly elected city or county officials who implemented it. Your elected officials. And why did Calhoud GA. except Walmart? More revenue in the county or city's coffers.
It still boils down to who is spending the money. Joe Public. Buyers Chioce.
Death, Taxes, and Walmart (or Home Depot or Lowes or Big 5 or--------)

BB
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  #64 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 09:20 AM
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Originally Posted by carolinacustoms View Post
I think a good example of Dave's post for the car world would be "maaco" or "all-pro" (just two of the BIG paint and body companies near by). They probably do take some business away from myself and other small shops around the area because they offer a $500 complete paint job. I can't cover the materials cost for that usually, so of course I cannot compete with their pricing. BUT I can offer a better quality repair for a little more money. Quality product at a reasonable price will usually win most people's business over a cheap product at a cheap price. I couldn't begin to tell you the number of people that have had work done at the "cheap" places and came to me because they were not happy with the job and could not get anything changed on the repair at the BIG shop because they signed a contract saying the big company was not responsible for (runs, sags, debris in the paint, bubbling, peeling, defective workmanship, faulty preparation.......) that is verbatim off of one of the big companies contracts!!!!! I sand and buff every paint job and even though I am a little more expensive I provide a quality product at a reasonable price, in turn I have plenty of work. People will talk about a great repair or paint job only until another one comes by, but a bad repair or job will get talked about forever. I stand behind my work and I refuse to lower my standards or quality to play a pricing war. I don't buy much from the big chains because the product quality is usually compromised for low price. I work hard for my money and I try to spend it on quality products. Good day all.

Kelly
Kelly, we have a Macco in town and we have a great relationship with them, we trade work all the time. He is a very nice guy, good businessman and he does some pretty decent "restoration" type paint and body work on older cars, some have blown me away I'll tell you that, looking very good. He sends us the hard hits and we send him the customer pays that don't want to spend what we charge and it's all good.

Brian
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  #65 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by boothboy View Post
What it still all boils down to is Buyers Choice. If the buyer didn't want to shop at the big guys store they wouldn't exist. How you spend your money is entirely up to you. Sometimes it takes a little "education" to learn how to spend your money wisely. Don't complain about the paint run if you signed a contract that specifically stated the the big guy wasn't responsible. You agreed to except that run before the job was started. If you didn't want that run them you had the option to find someone who would agree to your expectations. Buyers choice. Don't like cheap products, don't buy from Walmart. Buyers choice. Walmart didn't try to invoke Imminent Domain in Calhoun GA. They approached Calhoun GA.'s government asking to build on that parcel of land and Calhoun GA. forced the sale of that land under Imminent Domain for the " betterment of the community" Walmart might have suggested it but it was the duly elected city or county officials who implemented it. Your elected officials. And why did Calhoud GA. except Walmart? More revenue in the county or city's coffers.
It still boils down to who is spending the money. Joe Public. Buyers Chioce.
Death, Taxes, and Walmart (or Home Depot or Lowes or Big 5 or--------)

BB
BB, speaking of complaining about the paint run, I wish I could stand there and listen to what is told to those customers at the McPaint stores. Like I said, I know one of these guys fairly well, been out to the ball park and had a few beers with him, very, very nice guy. His dad had a body shop when he was a kid, he did something else (I forget what) and at 50ish he bought this franchise. Now I know what we say to customers "It will look exactly as it did before", "We have a life time warrantee", on delivery "Remember, if you see anything today, tomorrow or next year that you aren't happy with bring it back, just because you are leaving right now doesn't mean it's over with, we WILL stand behind our lifetime warrantee".

What does he say? I have been over there when he has a customer in the office and I never have heard exactly how he "sets the expectations" OR how he reads the expectations of the customer. He must send people away all the time, some consumer who has no clue hears "America's Body shop" heck, it's one of the only shops in the area that has any type of advertising, he has heard the name just as he has heard the name of the Hardware store in towns name at Parades and such. So when he gets his late model car scratched he goes there. I know that I have heard from customers how just a scratch down the side he is selling them a complete paint job because matching colors isn't there thing. But I know a heck of a lot of our customers would NEVER, EVER pick their car up looking like their best work, there is NO WAY they would put up with the work, their expectations are too high for that.

But again, I have to say they have their place, heck someone in our office had their daily driver painted there. And I am not kidding you, I have looked over some classic car paint jobs they did, we are talking not even removing the chrome moulding but meticulously taping them and they were VERY nice from as close as 5 feet away, really nice work.

You know what, I just realized we have hijacked this great thread and we need to go onto another for this discussion.

And I started a thread..... Big fish-little fish, chain vs mom and pop talk.

Brian
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  #66 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 09:55 AM
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What it still all boils down to is Buyers Choice. If the buyer didn't want to shop at the big guys store they wouldn't exist. How you spend your money is entirely up to you. Sometimes it takes a little "education" to learn how to spend your money wisely. Don't complain about the paint run if you signed a contract that specifically stated the the big guy wasn't responsible. You agreed to except that run before the job was started. If you didn't want that run them you had the option to find someone who would agree to your expectations. Buyers choice. Don't like cheap products, don't buy from Walmart. Buyers choice. Walmart didn't try to invoke Imminent Domain in Calhoun GA. They approached Calhoun GA.'s government asking to build on that parcel of land and Calhoun GA. forced the sale of that land under Imminent Domain for the " betterment of the community" Walmart might have suggested it but it was the duly elected city or county officials who implemented it. Your elected officials. And why did Calhoud GA. except Walmart? More revenue in the county or city's coffers.
It still boils down to who is spending the money. Joe Public. Buyers Chioce.
Death, Taxes, and Walmart (or Home Depot or Lowes or Big 5 or--------)

BB
I guess it boils down to who greased whos pocket,,betterment of the community im sure the people who lost there homes and the small buisnesses that had to go out of buisness might dissagree,WalMart can sell most products cheaper than smaller stores can buy them ,espacially appliances,because they have them built to there specs and purchace in Huge quanitys,usually a lesser quality John Deere is a good example i have 4 John Deere 3 Mowers and a tractor parts dont interchange without mods,small parts are the same ,filters plugs etc.but decks hubs and engines are different,Walmart does have a purpose and a rite toi do buisness ,i just dont agree with people loosing there homes and buisness ,Just because Wal mart wanted the land,regardless how the words are twisted to make it look and seem OK people will still buy and they will stay in buisness you can see from stock prices,but i still dont have to like it,IMO

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  #67 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 10:38 AM
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I think it all started at around age 6 for me ... always had a fascination with "what make things tick" (literally) as my parents told the story of me disassembling an old alarm clock. OK, the gears inside ended up being really cool gyroscopic tops and the clock never got re-assembled either.


The next signifigant thing was a fascination with an old record player / radio cabinet given to my by my grandmother. I remember re-soldering broken speaker connections with my wood-burning iron. I got a mobile cassette-tape player for Christmas, and eventually figured out how to playback Led Zeppelin through the old record player with the amplified 16" speaker.

Then it was washing-machine engines ...


Dad brought home 3 of these, in various stages of completeness ... and I finally disassembled, cleaned, and adjusted things well enough to make one of them run. What a rush that was!!! I knew I was hooked at that point.

One of my uncles (George) was a radio news reporter (later TV reporter) and the other (Jim) was a partsman at a Ford Dealership.I struggled with the "what do I want to do when I grow up" choices between these two.

Everyone said I had the "face for radio" LOL (actually "voice for radio" but the other line always got more laughs.)
My Uncle Jim (the Partsman) always seeemed to be the one having the most fun ... so that is the path I chose.

I've been doing it for 36 years now, and still going. It can be rewarding some days, frustrating on others ... but there are a couple of things that have really kept me in this field.

1.) It's pretty much a "recession-proof" industry. When times get tough, people fix their clunkers and junkers instead of buying new. When times are good, industrial customers and repair shops spend more money ... and then there are guys like you and I that love to fix and customize old cars and trucks!

2.) It never gets really boring. Keeping up with change means learning something new on a daily basis. Anyone that claims to "know it all" just has to realize that that claim is, at best, a very temporary accomplishment.

Last edited by 66GMC; 03-17-2013 at 10:43 AM. Reason: "clack"? :D
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  #68 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 07:55 PM
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Originally Posted by 496CHEVY3100 View Post
I guess it boils down to who greased whos pocket,,betterment of the community im sure the people who lost there homes and the small buisnesses that had to go out of buisness might dissagree,WalMart can sell most products cheaper than smaller stores can buy them ,espacially appliances,because they have them built to there specs and purchace in Huge quanitys,usually a lesser quality John Deere is a good example i have 4 John Deere 3 Mowers and a tractor parts dont interchange without mods,small parts are the same ,filters plugs etc.but decks hubs and engines are different,Walmart does have a purpose and a rite toi do buisness ,i just dont agree with people loosing there homes and business ,Just because Wal mart wanted the land,regardless how the words are twisted to make it look and seem OK people will still buy and they will stay in business you can see from stock prices,but i still don't have to like it,IMO
Your absolutely right. All the big guys do the same thing. The washing machine you buy from Sears has cheaper parts then those bought from a appliance store. Home Depot does the same thing. The John Deere you buy there just like Walmart's isn't made by John Deere. It's made by MTD. The John Deere mower bought from John Deere is made by John Deere. But it still comes down to buyers choice. The town I live in kept Walmart from building by actively pounding on our local government and they listened. No Walmart. The town down the road from me tried to claim Imminent Domain on a parcel of land that a third generation family that ran a nursery they owned. They actively appealed to the public and it worked. The county abandoned there plans to build a " nicer" business park. It can happen.

BB
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  #69 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by 66GMC View Post
I think it all started at around age 6 for me ... always had a fascination with "what make things tick" (literally) as my parents told the story of me disassembling an old alarm clock. OK, the gears inside ended up being really cool gyroscopic tops and the clock never got re-assembled either.


The next signifigant thing was a fascination with an old record player / radio cabinet given to my by my grandmother. I remember re-soldering broken speaker connections with my wood-burning iron. I got a mobile cassette-tape player for Christmas, and eventually figured out how to playback Led Zeppelin through the old record player with the amplified 16" speaker.

Then it was washing-machine engines ...


Dad brought home 3 of these, in various stages of completeness ... and I finally disassembled, cleaned, and adjusted things well enough to make one of them run. What a rush that was!!! I knew I was hooked at that point.

One of my uncles (George) was a radio news reporter (later TV reporter) and the other (Jim) was a partsman at a Ford Dealership.I struggled with the "what do I want to do when I grow up" choices between these two.

Everyone said I had the "face for radio" LOL (actually "voice for radio" but the other line always got more laughs.)
My Uncle Jim (the Partsman) always seeemed to be the one having the most fun ... so that is the path I chose.

I've been doing it for 36 years now, and still going. It can be rewarding some days, frustrating on others ... but there are a couple of things that have really kept me in this field.

1.) It's pretty much a "recession-proof" industry. When times get tough, people fix their clunkers and junkers instead of buying new. When times are good, industrial customers and repair shops spend more money ... and then there are guys like you and I that love to fix and customize old cars and trucks!

2.) It never gets really boring. Keeping up with change means learning something new on a daily basis. Anyone that claims to "know it all" just has to realize that that claim is, at best, a very temporary accomplishment.
Good stuff, it's funny how different the mechanical mind is, you wanted to know "How things ticked", I wanted to make them more purty. So funny, art, how things LOOKED was my thing, how did they make that car look better than stock...hmmmm

Really good post there, I enjoyed it.

Brian
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  #70 (permalink)  
Old 03-17-2013, 08:21 PM
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Yea i agree bigger hills,better thrills,fast cars ,pretty women ..or are the last two backwards...
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Old 03-17-2013, 08:58 PM
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I got started when I was too young to remember! I do remember at around 8-9 yrs. old that the next door neighbor had a big garage, and was always working on something cool! I hung out there at the doorway every day, and eventually worked my way inside, then got tossed out. I kept working my way back until he told me, "If you're gonna be in here at least make yourself useful and hand me that wrench!"
From there I spent most of my younger years working and saving to buy a car, and at 13 yrs. old I saved enough to buy my uncle's '47 International panel truck. I worked on it every time I could save money, and had it running in about 3-4 months. Then my dad took the keys, because he was afraid I'd start driving before I was legal! Had to ask anytime I wanted to start it up, and get the key.
When I graduated hi school I had been working in a bakery for two years cleaning up, and I immediately quit and went to work for the local Cadillac dealership. It was my dream job, and I started as a car jockey taking cars from the service floor to the mechanics. The mechanics immediately took me in, and I was there 6 months when the manager sent me to the GM Training Center.
After working there for over 24 months I got drafted, and went in the military. When I came home I went back to get my job, but GM Fisher plant was on strike, and work was slow, so I was relegated to 20 hrs. a week. I ended up leaving and getting into the electrical trade, like my father and grandfather had. Retired as an electrician after over 30 years, but built lots of cars over those years, and enjoyed building cars even more when I wasn't working on them all day, so it actually worked out well!
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Old 03-17-2013, 11:28 PM
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When I think of the driving I did in my truck with no windows and no front sheetmetal and stuff like that oh my God. I would weld or sand or something on it for five minutes and then drive it for 10, then work on it for 5 and drive it again. LOL I would be wearing safety goggles. My dear parents let me get away with murder! It had no license, no insurance. As I am thinking about it now I maybe they didn't know and I was doing it when they weren't home? I don't know, I did it a lot I think they were just unaware of how far I would go?

Brian
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Old 03-18-2013, 09:43 AM
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1971...Thanks for your service.

When my Dad went to college; he bought his 55 chevy in 1968 with no engine; went to the junkyard and got a 307 and a 3spd w/ OD and dunked them in the car, some new (used tires and brake shoes and drove it to Pittsburg KS from Syracuse, NY. When we were restoring his car 30yrs later, I said "Would you have let me do that?" "%$#& NO!" LOL how times change.
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Old 03-18-2013, 10:08 AM
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1971...Thanks for your service.

When my Dad went to college; he bought his 55 chevy in 1968 with no engine; went to the junkyard and got a 307 and a 3spd w/ OD and dunked them in the car, some new (used tires and brake shoes and drove it to Pittsburg KS from Syracuse, NY. When we were restoring his car 30yrs later, I said "Would you have let me do that?" "%$#& NO!" LOL how times change.
Sure was a different time! I had a '40 Chevy coupe I bought from a coworker at the Cadillac dealership. Paid $50 for it and it was a very nice driver, with no rust! The block cracked while I was in basic training, so when I got home on leave my buddy and I did a drivetrain swap. His father rolled their '59 Imperial, so I bought it for $50 and put the 413, 727, and rearend in the '40 coupe. Then dropped a Chevy truck straight axle under the front.
My dad was not too excited about the swap, as he figured we'd kill ourselves going too fast! It was the source of many an enjoyable drag race, and that would have confirmed his worries if he'd known what we were doing!
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Old 03-18-2013, 04:02 PM
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how i got started

istarted out playing in my uncles junk yard around5yrs of age from there my family moved to grandads farm where you learn to fix just about anything. at 14 i built my first dunebuggy and tore up a lot of topsoil lol i went to trade school at 17 .got my first job at a vw dealer as an apprentice . from there to other dealerships over35yrs .i am now retired due to health problems.istarted in 1970 and i got to see a lot of changes in car design , safety,handling,power,engine management over the yrs.i still like to work on my 67 mustang because it takes me back to when things were simpler ,i did upgrade to rack &pinon,disk brakes,heavy sway bars,&302 full roller engine,heads,cam,intake ,carb,headers,just to make it safe &fun to disturb the peace. old school techs like me sometimes havea hard time keeping up with new technology so we,ll leave the new world of hybrids &electric cars to the next generation of gearheads
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