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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-04-2004, 09:58 AM
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I noticed something...nobody mentioned a damper.
Good thought. If this stove doesn't have air controls a damper in the pipe would be a good idea. Most of the newer stoves will have both. Dan

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Old 12-05-2004, 04:22 AM
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Hey Rusttorod...Snap some pics of the installation process as you go. Might be a good thing to post as the cold season is fast upon us and some others may want to do the same thing. Also one other thing I failed to mention earlier...make sure you have your roof flashing installed correctly. The bottom (towards the edge of the roof) of the flashing will be on top of the shingles and exposed a little while the top (towards the peak) will be underneath the shingles. Get a flat bar and a putty knife to loosen the old shingles. Use the putty knife first to loosen the shingle, slide the flat bar underneath to work the nail loose, then pull the nail from the top. This will keep your shingle from tearing. You will also have to probably go 3 or 4 wide and probably 5 down to get enough room for the flashing. Just a small tip.

Kevin
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Old 12-08-2004, 09:09 PM
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The chimney has been installed! I looked all over the internet looking for chimney roof kits. TSC had one listed, but not in stock. I couldn't find anything about chimney parts on the lowe's website. I decided to go by there one more time, and they finally had the stovepipe parts in stock. They had a roof install kit just like TSC's, but it was only $123, so that saved me about 40 bucks. I got the double wall too - 2 three foot sections and 1 two foot section to get it up high enough. Thanks to you guys, I was able to grab everything I needed pretty quickly.

Installation wasn't too bad. A lot of work for a first timer, but could've been worse. One mistake I made (by not following the directions closely enough) was nailing down the roof flashing before I had the double wall sections put together and sticking through the roof. The flashing was just slightly off center after I nailed it down. It looked more flexible than it really was. When I shoved the chimney pieces through it from the attic space, they didn't line up with the framing I built for the chimney's ceiling support. I had to go back up on the roof (dark outside by now), pull the nails out, got the black sealer goop all over me, install the chimney straight, and put the flashing back down. Would've been much easier to put the chimney up before positioning the flashing.

Everything else went together like legos. Grand total was real close to $365. That doesn't include the 16' extension ladder I had to buy too, but that was only $60.

I just fired it up tonight, and it worked great. I felt of the pipes in the attic space, and they were only warm to the touch. I'm very happy I did this little project myself, I figure I saved at least a few hundred dollars. And you know what that means - more money for hot rod parts!

I would like to say THANK YOU for all the help and advice!!

-Shane
www.RustToRod.com
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Old 12-09-2004, 04:26 PM
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Way to go. Nothing better than heat in the garage on the chilly days/nights! Glad everything went fine without too much of a hitch.

Kevin
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Old 12-10-2004, 01:58 AM
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Good deal, rustorod. Glad we could be of some help. Dan
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Old 12-23-2004, 07:52 AM
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garage heat

That is a cool looking stove. Good luck with it.

I was going the wood stove route but decided against it for a few reasons.
It takes awhile to get it going.
You have flame in an area with fumes and fuel.
It's messy.
I'm not comfortable leaving it to cool down.
Fire was a definite concern with my toys on the line.
During hard freezes I couldn't just turn it on to keep it above freezing.
Insurance wouldn't cover the garage with it.

My garage is 24 x 44. I decided to insulate and sheet rock it. (You'll find out who your friends are here) I installed an air handler with electric heat strip as well as AC in the attic. I ran flex duct to have 6 supplies and 2 returns. It really is simple and easy to install before rocking the ceiling. I did get someone else to hook up the condenser lines and check my work.
While the heat strip is expensive heat, it doesn't have to run long to heat the garage to low 60's which is plenty warm while working. The AC doesn't get used much, I had a free unit given to me and figured while I was at it...
My previous garage was a 12 x 24 concrete block icebox. Never again.

The way I figure it, if I'm going to put tens of thousands into my cars, a couple of grand to get the garage in shape is just part of the restoration cost.
Plus it makes it more enjoyable and I want to be out there more. Which is the whole reason for having it.
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Old 12-23-2004, 05:08 PM
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Woodburners are great! you are going to love yours. I would recommend insulating in the future as it sure makes a difference. I'm heating a 30X36 with 13' ceilings with wood, yep sometimes you have to open the door This year I spent about $800 on insulating and rewireing and what a difference! 1-1/2" foam on the walls (steel pole building) and ceiling along with about 10" or more blown in in the ceiling. I can go from 40 to 70 in about 20 minutes, and even after a chilling night of +5 it was still 40 the next evening when I went out! You can even lay on the floor and it isn't that cold! I wish I would have done this 20 years ago!! No more wrenches sticking to my hands!
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 11-27-2005, 02:04 PM
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Old 11-28-2005, 11:48 AM
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Two other things I'm surprised no one mentioned: Set it up on cinder blocks ( or similar non-combustible material) to get the bottom of the stove a minimum of 18" above the floor. Gas and other flammable vapors are typically heavier than air and will settle to the floor. You do not want to ignite a garage full of gas vapor! (duh)
Second, investigate the stove to see if it has provisions for outside combustion air, and if so install a duct for that. This will let your stove burn without sucking warmed air from your garage, let it draft well from not having to suck combustion air from your (hopefully) relatively airtight space, reduce chances of backdrafting and potential CO poisoning.
You have to be careful with a wood stove in an auto shop, of course, and it's really not the best idea. That said, I have one in mine and I really like it. It's much classier and friendlier than a noisy unit heater or something like that. Just beware that it is dangerous, and many building codes will not allow a solid fuel burning appliance in a garage at all.

John
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Old 11-30-2005, 05:16 AM
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Rusttorod,

For what its worth, go here: http://www.duravent.com/

They are a supplier of all types of vent pipe systems, and have a lot of information on their installation pages.They may be able to help you out.....

Steve
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 12-08-2005, 09:52 PM
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I just noticed my old thread came back to the homepage. Last year I enjoyed using the wood stove in the shop. I have a couple personal observations about wood heat -

It takes a long time to warm up the shop. Unless you plan on spending at least half the day in the shop, it's not worth the trouble to get it up to temp.

Chopping wood is a lot of work. A neighbor cut down a tree right before the cold season hit, and he cut the trunk to the right width, and I split it. The tree was about 2' diameter, and freakin heavy! I bought a nice ax with a heavy duty composite plastic handle, which did a great job, but it wore me out. Still have enough left for this year.

I used more wood than I expected, probably because I ran it full blast to heat up my shop quicker. It takes a while for the heat to get through the thick steel.

It takes a lot of kindling to get the fire started. I picked up 2 large plastic bags of twigs from the tree in my neighbor's yard. I bought a pack of starter biscuit things from TSC which helped a lot, but it takes a while for those logs to catch on fire. I started cutting the firewood into thinner pieces and keeping several inside at a time.

Once the hot coals accumulate, it's easy to keep it going, just toss in a couple more every 30 minutes. The radiant heat will warm your face from 10 feet away. It easily kept the shop at 68-72 degrees even on the coldest days.

Overall, I really like the wood stove, and it's quite enjoyable to have in the shop, but for my purposes, I'm thinking about selling it and getting a torpedo heater. I'm sure someone would get more use out of it than I can.

-Shane
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Old 12-09-2005, 02:16 AM
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Quote:
Gas and other flammable vapors are typically heavier than air and will settle to the floor. You do not want to ignite a garage full of gas vapor! (duh)
Propane vapors are heavier than air, but I believe gasoline vapors can fill a room. Don't keep gas in the same place or near a woodburner.
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Old 12-09-2005, 12:45 PM
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Just a note on firewood.
Seasoned wood is a must, green wood will use more energy to stay lit than the heat it puts out. Creosote buildup happens more quickly with green wood, choked down fires (less air for cumbustion) and is a major concern for a chimney fire. Creosote is a bear to remove. Seasoned fire wood will show larger cracks on the cut end, there is a sharper ring when you knock 2 pieces together versus a dull thonk. Heavy wood often means moisture. The harder the wood the better, oak, fruitwoods, etc.
With a enclosed stove, lots of kindling to start is a must. Construction sites for scrap 2x4s (don't get treated), old pallets, small branches from trimming. Start with a couple of pieces of newspaper, add kindling. Never use a liquid starter, you're making a bomb. A lot of people don't plan far enough in advance for a good winter fire, start in the spring for next winters' season. Dan
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Old 02-17-2006, 07:23 PM
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how to install a wood stove for better heating

Another thing about wood stoves. If your stove has a blower on it it will double the BTU's it puts out. Radiant heat takes a long time to warm a shop. On a old stove I had I put a small fan to blow past it, in the winter. You would be surprised what a difference it made. Now my new wood stove has a blower on it and it gets toasty quick.
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Old 02-20-2006, 09:55 AM
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wood stove issues

I just installed a wood stove in my new shop last week. My familiy and I have heated our homes with wood since i was born (50 years ago). Straight up through the roof is probably the best for draft, but I have lived in many houses in 50 years and through the wall has never caused a problem. My fathers shop and mine both go through the wall and he has had no trouble in over 30 years. We both chose to go through the wall ( on the gable end) rather than through the roof for a couple reasons. First, you will usually end up with some leaks, especially where you have a heavy snow load (like here in Montana). If you have a metal roof, and much snow, the snow will usually rip your chimmney off your roof. I exited just under my roof trusses (I have 10 foot walls) and up the outside of the gable end. I used the kit from Lowe's (stainless steel). It looks fine and I didnt have to cut a hole in my roof. It took less than 4 hours, by myself. I would recommend help if you can get it. I had 3 foot sections and its difficult hanging on a ladder and twisting them together by yourself. As far as stoves, go, I have used all of them, Schrader, Earthstove, BlaseKing, Fisher, etc, as well as wood furnaces (some very expensive) and NONE heat as well as a double barrel stove( you should cut out the center of the top barrel and weld in some well casing and blow you fan through the casing).
Hope this helps,
MT case
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