how remove valve spring & measure rate? - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Hotrodding Basics
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-06-2011, 09:23 AM
001mustang's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: TN
Posts: 792
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
how remove valve spring & measure rate?

I would like to remove valve spring from SBF and measure rate.
Any heads up for fairly inexpensive tools and procedure?

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-06-2011, 09:42 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Gordonville MO
Age: 67
Posts: 307
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
http://www.mytoolstore.com/kd/kdengi13.html

Scroll down to the bottom to see the KD tool that you can use
to remove valve springs without removing the head.

They're available most regular auto parts stores.

Just be sure to have the piston at the top of the cylinder
before you start to remove the spring, otherwise the
valve can drop down into the cylinder, no matter what
other method you may use, like these for example.

Some folks use a compressed air fitting to hold air pressure
in the cylinder to hold the valve in place.

I've also seen folks stuff a short length of cord or something
thru the spark plug hole (be sure to leave an end out! :-)

Or a stiff piece of wire bent so that it runs into the cylinder
and under the valve you're removing.


As far as measuring tension, unless you rig something up
using a common scale and somehow compress the spring against
it and measure height, I don't know.

Only thing I've seen used is a special use spring tension
measuring device that didn't look at all inexpensive.

Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-06-2011, 10:26 AM
001mustang's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: TN
Posts: 792
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
thanks.

i forgot about the rope trick.

lol...leave end out...lol..have visions of facial expression one would make if end o rope feel in cylinder...lol

i have a shop press. maybe there is some kind of load sensor i could put between press ram and spring?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 04:59 AM
cal1320's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: central FL
Posts: 257
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 13 Posts
Try one of these with an arbor press or vice.

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/PRO-66834/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/PRO-66835/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 09:09 AM
001mustang's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: TN
Posts: 792
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
cool........
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 03:16 PM
Silverback's Avatar
Boost Retard
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: DC Metro
Posts: 378
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Those work and are the right way to do it, but I have to admit that I've done the same using a bathroom scale, a board over the top of it to spread the load, the spring on the board and the whole deal in a press. Setup some sort of gauge to tell how much you're compressing it (I used a 1" travel dial gauge, but you could use a dial or digital caliper, or even a decent ruler to get you ballpark), 0 the scale to compensate for the weight of the board, compress it slightly to get a reading on the scale, measure or 0 the height, and then compress it to get a significant reading (the more into the range that the scale is intended to read, typically 100-300lbs the more accurate the final number will be), measure the travel and calculate the rate...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 03:46 PM
001mustang's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: TN
Posts: 792
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
not as pretty but i don't see any reason why it wouldn't work pretty good.

i didn't think to attach dial to ram. good idea.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-07-2011, 04:53 PM
Silverback's Avatar
Boost Retard
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: DC Metro
Posts: 378
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
it's not pretty, but it will work as well as you set it up. In my case I found that it was reproducible within about 1.5lbs/inch and within 2lbs of what the proper setup in the shop showed... good enough.

Those things are just cylinders with a known piston area and calibrated pressure gauge, they're easy to make if you have access to a lathe, the hardest part is finding a proper o-ring to fit your calculated piston size if you don't want to do any conversion. I keep meaning to make a couple of different size ones so I can measure how much force I'm putting on stuff in the press
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-22-2011, 12:26 AM
001mustang's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: TN
Posts: 792
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silverback
Those work and are the right way to do it, but I have to admit that I've done the same using a bathroom scale, a board over the top of it to spread the load, the spring on the board and the whole deal in a press. Setup some sort of gauge to tell how much you're compressing it (I used a 1" travel dial gauge, but you could use a dial or digital caliper, or even a decent ruler to get you ballpark), 0 the scale to compensate for the weight of the board, compress it slightly to get a reading on the scale, measure or 0 the height, and then compress it to get a significant reading (the more into the range that the scale is intended to read, typically 100-300lbs the more accurate the final number will be), measure the travel and calculate the rate...
Thanks awesome idea.

i cut some cards to 1.8", 1.77", 1.323" and 1.25".
preloaded scale w/ a 20lb weight and zeroed the scale.
took several measurements using press.
too easy
my calculated rate=308.6 lbs/inch.
COMP cam spring advertised rate is 308 lbs/inch.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Hotrodding Basics posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how do i measure valve seat for valve head diameter? 406 ss monte Engine 2 04-07-2010 09:36 AM
Coil-Over Spring Rate J-Garden Suspension - Brakes - Steering 12 12-20-2009 12:45 AM
need to know coil spring rate runn141 Suspension - Brakes - Steering 2 11-27-2006 03:00 PM
spring rate? Blob Suspension - Brakes - Steering 7 02-04-2005 04:20 AM
Valve Spring Remove And Install Help! Angelshock23 Engine 9 09-27-2004 02:23 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.