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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 06-10-2004, 12:21 PM
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Century welders

I don't think Century is what I would call an off brand. I have bought century welders over a 30 year period. They have been around since 1937, were the first to come up with infinate amperage control also in 1937. They were the first to also develop infinate voltage control for mig welders. I know several people rag on century welders but I have never had a problem with the 4 I have owned. The first was a 295 amp a/c with hi/lo range, used it for 15 years then sold it to buy the 230/140 a/c-d/c and am still using it with no problems at all. The third was a 110 volt 85 amp mig that I used for 8 years and sold it to a friend 2 years ago when I bought a 170GS mig, 220 volt with a max of 170 amps, this one has been a great welder as the other 3 have also been. I have been welding along time and they all have welded as well as the millers and lincolns I have used at the various places I have worked in the past. I thnk you did good on your purchase. Ofcourse I may get static from others on this but you always do on these things. good luck!

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2004, 06:02 AM
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I bought my welder back

My Dad wanted to use it and didn't want to worry about damage so he insisted on paying me for my Lincoln 100 mig welder. Now he's done and wants to sell my welder back to me for $350 since he replaced some needed parts. I'll pick it up today.


Tazz


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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2004, 03:24 PM
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Re: Century welders

Quote:
Originally posted by gcrmcc
I don't think Century is what I would call an off brand.
No, i meant that S. D. Lee is an off brand of Century.

Chris
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Old 06-13-2004, 10:43 PM
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Off brand

Hey, sorry man, I miss read your statement as Century being off brand. Yes, Century built welders for alot of companys, Sears Craftsman, Montgomery Wards, Snap on tools, Mac tools, Dayton, S.D. lee and the list goes on. I have always heard that the welders built by Century for off brand names are the same quality welders that Centrury sells with there own name on it, just the name has been changed. You should have an excellent A/C welder to learn on and use common sense and don't abuse the duty cycle all the time the welder will last forever!! If you would take the cover off and lube the lock lever pivot point and the part that slides that is attached the lock lever that moves the shunt but do not lube the shunt it self. The shunt is the large steel plate part that moves up and down in the big transformer it self. You can take compressed air and blow the dust out of the shunt and transformer and lube the linkage with wheel bearing grease and lock, slider and shunt will work so much smoother. Good luck learning to weld and if you need a manual for your welder I can scan my A/C-DC 235 amp manual for mine and send it to you. The only difference in the manual is you would disregard the D/C welding sections. Let me know if you want copy. Later
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Old 06-16-2004, 03:26 PM
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Awesome, I will crack it open and get all that taken care of and cleaned out.

I would love a copy of the manual, the more stuff I get, the better off I will be. I really appreciate the help.

Chris
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Old 06-18-2004, 12:15 AM
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welder manual

I will copy the manual and send it to you via parcel post if you give me address. I could scan it and send to via email, Your choice. Of course I'll need your e-mail address. no charge either way. Later
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Old 08-06-2004, 06:30 AM
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Century Welder

Chris,

Did you ever get an electronic copy of the owner's manual? I ask because I have also come into a possession of the very same welder. It needed some work (the shunts were no damaged) but I am now trying to track down a copy of the owners manual. Hoping you could help
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Old 08-07-2004, 11:12 PM
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No, I have yet to find a copy of it online. If I do find it I will let ya know.

Right now I have a copy of a manual that gcrmcc sent me from one of his Craftsman welders. It is fairly close to what what I have have and helped me get a better understanding of what I will be doing as soon as I get a 220 line run to the garage and can start welding stuff together.

Thanks again gcrmcc.

Chris
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Old 08-07-2004, 11:23 PM
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welder manual

I recently e-mailed Lincoln electric and this is the reply I got from them to confirm what I had heard recently. "Century welders were recently purchased by The Lincoln Electric Co.. The
products are not yet listed on the web, but you may call 1-866-236-0044,
ext. 3 if you have questions." You two can call the above number and ask for a manual for model# Century 84230 Arc Welder. It will be the same manual to the welders you have except a Century model# instead of "Buzbox", same welder though. I hope this helps.

Last edited by gcrmcc; 08-12-2004 at 07:29 PM.
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2004, 11:40 AM
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He does it again, Thanks a lot man.

Chris
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Old 08-08-2004, 09:49 PM
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manual

Hello Chris, You will find if you get a manual through Lincoln, the only difference will be anything that has to do with D/C sections won't be in there, pretty much the same manual as mine though. Have you done any welding with your Buz Box yet? E-mail me off line if you get a chance, I can tell you some things about your welder that you can do with it. I think you'll like it. Later
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Old 08-11-2004, 06:23 AM
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Haaaaaa Really Good or Bad Weldor?

If it works - it is good.

If it does not work, the education is good.

The high and low ranges are actually the OPEN CIRCUIT VOLTAGES.

They are usually about ~40-45 V (OC) in the low tap, and ~75V (OC) in the high tap.

Some jobs and positions and materials and welding rods etc., work better with a higher starting /running voltage, and some work better with a lower starting / running voltage.

The reason for this is well to quote myself in another post......

The Quote:


Finger Licking Electrical Burns...

Ever notice that people who work with electricity (not AA batteries either) never ever wear jewelery (wrings, watches or loose dangly chains around the neck etc).


To use the into one hand and out the other - as a standard pathway and resistance parameters.

Here we go:

I am a qualified first class weldor, and there is a thing that (on average) clean dry cool skin has about 45V resistance to current flow and calloused skin (only bits of the hand) have more resistance.

And welding is a very hot and sweaty job...

Most welder machines have an open circuit voltages of either 45V or 75V - so that people either get little or no electrical shocks..... unless thier hand is sweaty, and they lean agains the boiler being welded..... and they stick the electrical rod underneath their sweaty armpit (in coveralls).... while they light their cigarette - and then die.

This is why you can grab or at least touch both terminals of a 12V battery and not get any electrical current flowing through your body...

(2 x 45V) - 12 = 68V above current flow.

BUTT - when JEWELERY covers the skin, the moisture (persiration = water + salts) builds up underneath the jewelery, significantly dropping the voltaic resistance to SFA (= virtually nothing or close to it)


You have metal (good conductor) -> wet salty skin (very low resistance / fairly good conduction) and this one piece of jewelery has efectively dropped the electrical resistance to about half of what it was formerly 90V - 45V = 45V...

And if you wear a ring or rings on both hands... or a watch and a ring on either hand etc.... what you have done is set up a fairly lethal situation as far as electricity being able to go through your body.....

You get other fun things like people who wear steel cap boots., and the leather covering the steel cap has worn through.. and the boots are filled with hot and sweaty feet.... and some one has their welder set to 75V and they are kneeling "on the job" and they pick up a conductive electrode with bare sweaty hands.......

As one old tradesman once said - "Well apprentices are cheap... if one kills himself, they just get me another one".



Then you get the classical "dead short (circuit)" where the jewelery conducts electrictity between part A and part B...


Time for pretend time.

Say 1 PSI = 1V....

Electricity is like a garden hose and a fire hose.... if you can have a small hose feeding water at high pressure and it delivers say 10 gallons a minute at 100 psi... (100V) and then you have the fire hose feeding 10 gallons a minute at 12 psi....(12V)

The idea is the VOLUME of water delivered in a period of time...


The fun thing about 12 batteries is that while the VOLTAGE is LOW, they are designed to SUPPLY huge amounts of power for short periods.....

All 12 V batterys deliver stacks of power and I can't compare a motorcycle battery to a pick up with 2 BIG batteries in parrallel, but I recall an average car battery will put out about 250~300 amps in a dead short...

And in dead shorts... they will supply enough electricity (power = heat) to incinerate a ring on your finger or a watch band around your wrist... in the blink of an eye......

And dead shorts tend to "weld" the ring in place while your finger gets burnt off.....


The old maxim of an ounce of prevention is better than a pound of cure - tends to hold much truth....


Depending upon the job.... which means that you take precautions to stop shorting from occouring or that you disconnect the battery....

And unless the job required live electricity - either isolate the actual circuit and or disconnect the battery at the negative terminal (on neg earth systems)


I also note that all the SMART weldors, autoelectricians and people / professionals who work with serious amounts of power - well NON of them, wear jewelery - when working with electricity.

The DUMB ones can't count to ten.


Take the hint....


(ende of quote)

The reason why weldors are built with 2 ranges of OCV is that on a moderate day with bare dry skin, at 45V - your highly unlikely to get electrocuted, and with 75V, your quite close to getting electrocuted.

It's just that some jobs require a higher OCV to both establish and maintain an adequate arc.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 08-12-2004, 07:37 PM
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12 volt batteries

The battery in my motorcycle has 340 cold cranking amps, most car batteries now have about 400-550 cold cranking amps and some as high as 900 or more cranking amps. A good M/C battery delivers more amps now than some older car batteries did not to long ago. Just thought I would mention this as a motorcycle can and will burn the jewlery as bad as a car battery can. A car or M/C battery will usually put out the cranking amps when dead shorted. Yes, things get real hot real fast!! Another note, I have NEVER been shocked by my welders. I have been welding since 1971. Just got to be aware of the dangers of electricity. Later

Last edited by gcrmcc; 08-12-2004 at 07:46 PM.
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Old 08-13-2004, 01:17 AM
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Yeah......

It's been about 15 - 20 years since I looked in to just how much a battery puts out - the cold cranking amps... and at 3am after a long days work... I try to qualify my figured as "I recall" and not "it is"....

As for getting weak to mild electric shocks off welders, well I find it a stimulating experience to attach elecrodes to assorted parts of my body - "It's all part of the grand American Dream".
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