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-   -   Iwata paint gun (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/iwata-paint-gun-228410.html)

benchracer1 01-15-2013 09:42 AM

Iwata paint gun
 
I recently purchased an Anesta Iwata lpv 400 sparay gun. Orange cap. I have painted a couple bike tanks and I love it. It was rather difficult to get use to holding it close and slowing it up. I have always used a conventional siphon gun. Here is my question for you guys that are proficient with this gun.I have had the volume screw at two and a half turns out and the fan I just kinda winged it on and air inlet at 16 psi . I now am going to be spraying the outside of an entire vehicle and would like to be a little more precise in gun adjustment. The other question I have is on paint reduction. I will be spraying restoration shop Acylic Urethane. The directions say 4:1 paint to hardener and up to 1 quart of reducer to a gallon of paint. For the anesta gun (1.4 aIR CAP) what would be the best way to determine the poroper reduction. On most paints I have used in the past have a mixing ratio for paint, hardener and reducer. I really dont want orange peel or runs because of improper reduction......Steve

benchracer1 01-25-2013 09:03 PM

I went ahead and sprayed the paint today and for the most part came out well. I did however end up with a couple of runs. How long do you generally wait to wet sand and recoat single stage acrylic urethane. A little color sanding and 1 coat and it should be fine. Temp when I sprayed was 62. A little cool i guess.

benchracer1 01-25-2013 10:41 PM

I also found that I Had a fair amount of solvent pop. Is this caused by applying the second coat to soon. Should I have used a fast reducer instead of medium?

mr4speed 01-26-2013 05:47 AM

On the recoat time 24 hours should be suffient with the s/s. And spraying at that temp I would use the fastest reducer you can get, also go double if not triple on your flash times. The colder temps it will take longer to flash even with the fast reducer. That could be the reason for the runs and the sovlent pop. As far as what you should go for as a reduction, that is something you are going to have to play with (on a test panel) to see where you are comfortable with what percentage of a reduced mix that sprays out the best in your temp range. Usually 5 -10 percent.

69 widetrack 01-26-2013 10:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benchracer1 (Post 1638816)
I also found that I Had a fair amount of solvent pop. Is this caused by applying the second coat to soon. Should I have used a fast reducer instead of medium?

With respect to solvent popping...what are you using for an exhaust fan?...and did the the top panels pop and the where the sides OK? Solvent popping is often caused by the top of the paint you sprayed skimming over due to too much air moving over the car. If you the paint does skim over, the solvents left underneath the paint are still trying to get out and causing a volcano effect (or solvent pop) when they do finally get out. If your air flow is OK, the speed of your solvent (reducer) or hardner can also have a bearing on solvent popping.

RLDSL 01-26-2013 01:31 PM

A little more information about your location would be the most help Ramona could be in the middle of alaska, on top of a mountain in Bolivia, in a swamp in Brazil, you get the picture?
I'm not a paint expert by any means, but around here Ive found I have to wait at least a week before touching single stage in this ultra humid climate., even the body shops where they have fancy spray and cure facilities, I ended up waiting almost 2 weeks on a hood one time in real moist weather for them to get 2 good coats on it , now if youre in the desert, its a different story

Needless to say, i wont fool with the stuff unless the car already has it and its just a repair. because Im working outside, and having to wait a week or more to sand the inevetable bugs that land in it out is enough to drive you insane.

benchracer1 01-26-2013 10:29 PM

sorry, fixed that in my profile. Its outside san diego, ca. I dont have an exhaust fan just the prevailing breeze. The panels i sprayed were actually vw fenders. I think it was alittle cool and light rain and I did not give it enough time between coats. I am going to let the fenders sit for a week and spray the rest of the car later this week. Ill be a little more careful of btween coat times. I ll post the results....steve

69 widetrack 01-27-2013 04:38 AM

It's usually a good idea to slow things down a bit if experience isn't on your side...read and understand the tech sheets and choose the right hardner and reducer for the climate your spraying in. Let us know how you make out.

Ray

benchracer1 01-27-2013 12:21 PM

I was going to wwetsand the fenders with 400 and spray 1 more coat. Does sanding the solvent pops generally leave enough material or should i plan on 2 coats

69 widetrack 01-27-2013 02:00 PM

When I sand and repaint, I give it two coats...it's much easier to get an even, flat and glossy finish this way as compared to trying to lay down one wet coat trying to achieve the same results.

Ray

benchracer1 01-29-2013 08:15 PM

1 Attachment(s)
I began sanding the fenders today and found a couple of edges that needed a little bit of attention. I sanded the filler and expose a couple small areas. I have a couple more small spots to do. I really dont want to spray the whole fenders with sealer again mainly due to the fact that it will be alot of material on the fender. Can I just lightly prime the affected areas and then sand and put the additional color coats. The picture is an area about 1 or 2 inches long.

69 widetrack 01-30-2013 05:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by benchracer1 (Post 1640281)
I began sanding the fenders today and found a couple of edges that needed a little bit of attention. I sanded the filler and expose a couple small areas. I have a couple more small spots to do. I really dont want to spray the whole fenders with sealer again mainly due to the fact that it will be alot of material on the fender. Can I just lightly prime the affected areas and then sand and put the additional color coats. The picture is an area about 1 or 2 inches long.

I would recommend that you don't seal or prime the entire fender, prime the areas that you are concerned about, prep them with your finish grit of paper. If your spraying single stage (I can't remember if it was base coat or single stage), I would recommend that you prep the entire fender and put color on the entire fender. If it's base coat, same procedure but you wouldn't need to put color on the whole fender, just prime, prep the affected areas, blend your color and clear the entire fender.

Hope this helps.

Ray

benchracer1 01-30-2013 09:05 AM

That is what I was hoping to hear. It is a single stage. I knocked down the runs sucsesfully. After I prime and prep the area would it be a good idea to put a light tack coat of color to hide the prime then shoot 2 coats of color over the entire fender or just shoot the 2 coats and dont worry about it....Steve

69 widetrack 01-30-2013 09:50 AM

It's a matter o preference, a light tack coat doesn't hurt...some people say you have less chance of getting runs...but two medium wet coats after a tack coat is fine.

Ray

benchracer1 01-30-2013 10:42 AM

Thanx guys.....Ill let you know how it works out


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