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Old 01-03-2006, 04:08 AM
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Jaguar IRS?

Anyone here familiar with Jaguar IRS on hotrods?
I'm going to instali it on my '34 roadster.

Would be nice to see pic's/read other's experiences with this rearend.
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Old 01-08-2006, 06:12 AM
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Old 01-09-2006, 11:15 AM
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Search for Jag rear axle on this board. Min'e's not a 30s rod, but take a look at the pic of the axle out of the car in my photo album. You basically need to do the same thing -- make a crossmember that supports the axle and holds the shocks. You don't have to mount four shocks like the Jag -- you can use just two (one each side), especially in a lighter car. I'd make the crossmember so that it bolts out (like I did!). It's supper easy to remove the whole assembly -- disconnect brake lines and the two arms, pull bolts from crossmember, and it all drops out as a unit. If you ever have to do any work on it, you'll be glad you did! Otherwise the rod has to come half apart to get it out. I used regualr four link bars for the lower arms with 5/8" polyurethane lined ends.
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Old 01-10-2006, 01:38 AM
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Thank you for the answer farna.
I've read a lot about installing the jag' rear in custom applications, so I'm pretty much aware the principles.
But one thing is reading, another thing is real life experinece.

I clearliy see the advantages with a removable crossmember. Maybe I'll do the same. To lighten the serviceability on the axle I've made the flooor over the axle removable instead. Maybe I'll make the crossmember removable too. I'll think about it.

I must make the crossmember on my 34 with a kick up to get the differential high enough.
Many hot rod's have their Jag' axle wrong mounted with the lower arms parallell with the ground. Maybe the builders had IFS principles in their mind?
Or maybe they just thought it looked nicer?
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Old 01-10-2006, 08:22 AM
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My Rambler is my first Jag axle installation. I had no problems at all, and have been driving it for two years now. It's a daily driver -- I drive it back and forth to work and anywhere else I need to go. So it's a REAL daily driver -- not something I'm just not afraid to drive.

I had no idea how to set the rear end for ride height, so I took the most logical step -- I dropped by a local car dealer that had 3-4 late 80s/early 90s Jags and looked underneath. The lower arms were angled down so that the diff end was roughly 2" higher than the outbord end. That's how I installed it. If you looked at the pic of my axle, note the upper shock mounts. Instead of using a rod for the lower mount I made a bracket that I could drill holes for several locations. Since I didn't narrow my axle, I measured from the center of the diff to the center of a shock mount and made my brackets with a hole there. Then I drilled more holes with 1/4" between the outer edges of the holes so I could change the tilt of the shock if necessary. This worked great! Also note that I recessed the plate that mounts the diff slightly. I found that isn't necessary -- I could have welded it in flat. The reason I recessed it was so that I could use rubber bushings to mount the diff, and "jack nuts" (next paragraph). I drilled out shock absorber busings and put one abve and below the plate. Well, there is to much side pressure on the diff in hard cornering for that to work, so I ended up mounting it solid later. Even so, I could have welded the plate flush even with the 1/2" thick (compressed) bushings.

To get the pinion angle correct I used a 1/2" x4" stud in the top of the diff instead of bolts. I drilled 5/8" holes in the plate for a little room, then used grade 8 nuts and washers (also the studs!) on each side of the plate. This allows not only changing the angle of the diff, but also the level. This turned out to be a life saver!

If you have the center section of the floor removeable, that does help. But I'd still suggest making the crossmember (with upper shock mounts) removeable. It's just so convenient if maintenance is required later. It's much easier to pull that thing apart on a bench or the ground than overhead.

The two things I'll do different if there is a next time: Don't recess the plate for the diff on the crossmember. If you mount the crossmember between the rails (bottom of crossmember flush with bottom of rails) on a frame made for a standard diff, it will be at the right height. The diff hangs about 1" below the plate on mine. I welded 1/8" plate on the lower surface of the ends of the 3"x2" rectangular tubing I used for a crossmember that extended under the rear rails and bolted to the frame from underneath. Working on a full frame car I'd have done this differently -- maybe made a "socket" for the ends to sit in and run a bolt horizontally. In my case the weight of the car really holds everything in place, the bolts are just to support the axle weight when the body is jacked up.

I'd also make the upper shock mounts differently. As noted before, you can use one shock instead of a pair. If you use tubular shafts like a Corvette instead of the 1" or so forged Jag shafts, the shocks will have to be spaced further apart. Using a pair of shocks on each axle equalizes vertical forces on the crossmember. If you use a single shock you may want to have a separate crossmember for the shock mount (especially if further offset for tubular shafts) or a wide crossmember -- two pieces of tubing joined by short pieces (of likely smaller tubing). The lower support may need to be strengthened also, but it is a hardened steel rod and should support the weight, especially of a much lighter vehicle.

What I'd do next time is use a steel rod for the top also, or a piece of threaded thick wall tubing. A piece of tubing for the sleeve for a rod (or th tubing to be threaded) would have a flat plate welded in the center. This plate would have a 3/8" fine thread bolt hole on each side of the tubing. Now the tubing can be bolted to the crossmember where needed -- just drill into the crossmember lower surface and thread it. Make the two holes an even increment apart so that a series of holes can be drilled and tapped in the crossmember before installation at something like 1/2" on center intervals.

That should do it! You just need to know if you want to use one or two shocks per side first.
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Old 02-14-2006, 07:42 PM
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I have a jag rear end in my car and I wanted to change the bolt pattern to a ford 5 bolt pattern. Are there any suppliers for the Hub spindles in a Ford 5 bolt pattern, does anyone know of a machine shop that can redrill the pattern?

Also, are the stock lug studs screw in or pressed in?
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Old 02-16-2006, 08:45 AM
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Contact these people: http://www.cwiinc.com/index.html they have everything you'd ever dream of wanting for a Jag IRS, including bolt-in crossmembers.

The lugs are pressed in. The stock hub can be redrilled, the hole slightly recessed (flat bottom, not with a drill!) and new lugs pressed in. Then it must be put in a lathe and the heads of the lugs machined down to the seal profile. About 1/4 of the head is machined down some, not enough to weaken it much though. That's why Jag went with the 4.75" circle -- the 4.5" circle just dips into the seal area. You'll see once you pull a hub.

My Rambler has 5x4.5" wheels stock. I just bought a set of wheels drilled for both 4.5" and 4.75" bolt patterns. If that doesn't sit well with you, just buy different pattern for front and rear. Then buy a wheel with both patterns to use as a spare. Something like a Weld Draglite. I'm just carrying a 4.5" pattern Jeep 16" space saver spare for now, I'll just have to change two tires if I have a flat on the back. I'm considering getting another Draglite 4" or 5" wide and mounting a VW bug tire on it. Won't weigh any more (might weigh less!) or be any bigger than the space saver and will eliminate problems if I have a flat in the rear. Think of it as a "home made" space saver! Safer than the temporary donut tire too.
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Old 02-22-2006, 06:33 PM
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Thanks! Got parts on the way!
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