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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 11-19-2009, 08:41 PM
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I don'r really know....For legal resons I dont wanna tell the actual school but as you said the advise is shoddy at best and I just wanted to see what you guys thought before I argued with the info I was getting.

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 11-19-2009, 08:59 PM
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I would stop listening to your buddy, so many wrongs there it isn't funny. Probably be a good fit employee for many of the maacos out there though, heck don't even bother sanding it and just stuff holes with filler.

I sure hope a school isn't really teaching that sort of thing, and either he is full of bs and trying to sound like he knows more then he really does (like I seem to remember a few kids back in school being like and a young tech or two fresh in the body trade). The statement that he can spray it so smooth and not require any buffing and it will be show quality makes me think this is the case.

Those of us that have been around long enough have been humbled enough times in the past and know how easy imperfections are to get or how catastophic things can go at times, no matter how long you have been painting and taking all the steps to do everything right. Your bound to get at least a few imperfections and dirt nibs, even with the best of booths, equiptment and lighting, and buffing is needed pretty much everytime if the goal is to get it is flawless as possible. Urethane also has some inherent peel no matter how perfectly applied, which is why many guys here spend the added time flow coating and cutting and buffing to get show quality work.

But then I guess everyones defignition of show quality is different (seen enough in shows shaking my head why it was entered), and someone who has spent a lot of time working in paint and body can pick out flaws in pretty much any paint job if they look close and hard enough, and believe me that what most paint and body guys are looking for when at a show, we can't help it.

Out of what I could decipher out of that long runon sentance, the only thing I can maybe agree with is taking it to metal (but not needed in all situations if modern materials in sound condition and its a relatively new car), and maybe a 1.4 tip for shooting most urethanes.

Hardly anyone will use lacquer anymore, and any self respecting bodyman would either replace the part or replace holes with new metal, and wouldn't stuff holes with filler for a customer,(although surprising how often this is found once you dig into a vehicle for repair), and would send a car away if the customer didn't have the money to do it correctly or they didn't want to do the job.

Only thing that matters is the clear, bullpucky. Don't think there isn't a difference in the quality of the base and primers, and that they have an effect on outcome or longevity.
Do a search on here about self etch, and what most professionals opinions are of them.

If students are actually being taught that sort of nonsense in school, then thats a shame, being is school is costly and you go there to learn the correct procedures and materials to give a long lasting repair. If anything in my experience schooling teaches you correctly, and bad habits are most often picked up in a shop where often speed is priority and it has to look good (at least as good as from the factory) as it goes out the door and usually is meant to last as long as the car is either totaled or sold.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 11-19-2009, 09:15 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
I've considered using it as a filler on metal brackets and such that I want to powder coat. I'm not sure, however, if it would take the 400 plus degrees in the oven (anybody know for sure?). But I think it would work for a purpose like that in terms of vibration and body flex where it might not be advisable on a large thin panel.
Cboy check out Clifford Engineering they use JB Weld to lump port Chevy Six's on the intake side for high performance. I have used it on 5 Hp Briggs kart engines on the intake side to reduce the size of the port . Never had a problem with it. It is supposed to be good for 500 degrees.
Kenny
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 11-19-2009, 09:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dalesy
Man, I wonder if that school is teaching him to repair body damage like an old Popular Mechanics article I saw years ago. It showed a Karman-Ghia with a rusted out rocker panel. They said to grind out the badly rusted area, bend in the sharp edges, then stuff the rocker panel with newspaper and bondo over it. Simple, huh?
that's in the back of many Chilton manuals. I have a few from cars my parents had long ago.... my brother followed the directions on the Ranger he had, except he neatly cut out a peice of blue insulation foam for each hole.. popped out in a few months
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Old 11-19-2009, 10:42 PM
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kenseth17,and others "Out of what I could decipher out of that long runon sentance" I am sorry for my lack of grammar,spelling,and writing abilities.
I do understand that it is quite necessary to do the above listed things proper but that was never to important it seems to my school . For the record I am NOT using that as an excuse but more as an explanation.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2009, 04:57 AM
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Based on the information, It sounded like, or I was under the impression, it was a friend of yours that went to a bodywork class that was relaying the information, guess I was wrong.

Spelling doesn't seem all that bad to me, but there is spell check next to where you submit your reply.
You are not the first here with grammer or spelling issues. I am not the greatest speller myself and did write a lot of long replys full of run on sentances and no paragraphs when I first started posting. Language class wasn't one of my favorites back in school. Most won't give too hard of a time about it, but some can be brutal.

But if you take your time, and work on making your posts more easily readable using sentances and paragraphs, your likely to get your point across better and more people will take the time to read your post.

So is this "school" your talking about a high school shop class or a community college. I can maybe see it in certain high school shop class. I think my HS shop teacher kept a bottle in his desk, and many of the kids skipped out of class on shop day. And think many high school teachers are under payed. My shop teacher had a little mg, and one of his students painted it with a turbine sprayer the school had. I didn't look the greatest. The teacher could be an old timer stuck in his old ways and hasn't kept up with the times.

If its a tech school or college, then really no escuse. Most jobs I've seen advertised for tech school teacher has payed pretty well with good benefits, and often require both a college degree and years of experience in the field they are teaching.
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2009, 08:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenseth17
Based on the information, It sounded like, or I was under the impression, it was a friend of yours that went to a bodywork class that was relaying the information, guess I was wrong.

Spelling doesn't seem all that bad to me, but there is spell check next to where you submit your reply.
You are not the first here with grammer or spelling issues. I am not the greatest speller myself and did write a lot of long replys full of run on sentances and no paragraphs when I first started posting. Language class wasn't one of my favorites back in school. Most won't give too hard of a time about it, but some can be brutal.

But if you take your time, and work on making your posts more easily readable using sentances and paragraphs, your likely to get your point across better and more people will take the time to read your post.
What it takes is simply trying to improve, if one puts in a little effort it is amazing how much one can improve. When I started messing around on the net, typing and English were as far out of my world as you could get. It just wasn't what I had been interested in, it just wasn't me. I spent my time perfecting my autobody and paint skills on the job and my spare time went to perfecting my guitar and singing.

I got on the net and just fumbled. What I did to work on it was to write my posts in an email first and check spelling and punctuation and ask my wife (who is a English master) and make sure I did it right as to not look like I was as dumb as I am. So I worked and worked on it forcing myself to type correctly with all my fingers and forcing myself to spell correctly (well most of the time) and in a short time I had you guys all fooled into thinking I wasn't a hack.

Brian
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2009, 09:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MARTINSR
What it takes is simply trying to improve, if one puts in a little effort it is amazing how much one can improve.
I was given a good piece of advice one time, by a man I respect.

He said, "Take the things that you dislike and are the worst at, and practice until you are good at them. You will see that you no longer dislike them, they won't be a chore- they will be enjoyable."

There are STILL things I'm no good at and things I don't enjoy. But at least SOME of the things I used to despise, I don't anymore. Like getting the primary needles into the jets on a Q-jet/Dual-jet. lol

But back to the JB Weld. Does it set up any harder than Bondo? I would have thought it would be harder to sand.

I've used it cured in an oven at 325 F, I don't recall what temp it will withstand, but if what's cited above is correct (and I have no reason to doubt it) it's pretty durable, at least when it comes to heat.

Last edited by cobalt327; 11-20-2009 at 09:19 AM.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2009, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt327
There are STILL things I'm no good at and things I don't enjoy. But at least SOME of the things I used to despise, I don't anymore. Like getting the primary needles into the jets on a Q-jet/Dual-jet. lol
That is a huge aggravation to overcome

Vince
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2009, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 302 Z28
That is a huge aggravation to overcome

Vince
Did it again!

Should be-
There are STILL things I'm no good at and things I don't enjoy. Like getting the primary needles into the jets on a Q-jet/Dual-jet. lol But at least SOME of the things I used to despise, I don't anymore.

I don't think I'll EVER like doing those needles!
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 11-20-2009, 05:43 PM
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The school I am referring to is a Community college.For the most part the above was a direct quote to what he was telling me,BUT I feel like even then I should have been a little more clear about the actual details of what he said.At first I felt like the teacher in question was just behind the times and not up to date. The more I thought about it the more it occurred to me that it couldn't be he was that behind because he said to use "this" new world product with "this" old school technique.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 11-21-2009, 07:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cboy
I've considered using it as a filler on metal brackets and such that I want to powder coat. I'm not sure, however, if it would take the 400 plus degrees in the oven (anybody know for sure?). But I think it would work for a purpose like that in terms of vibration and body flex where it might not be advisable on a large thin panel.
It would handle the oven temps OK, but the powder would probably not be drawn to it, as it's not a good conductor.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 12:44 AM
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I would think that JB has a less expansion property than old polyester fillers that we are forced to use and considering its superior bonding to metal property, I have no quibbles with using JB as a filler. my experience with bondo is it is less forgiving in the sun and absorbs moisture more which leads to separation more.As far as being professional goes, Whats your point? Its all about what works best.I use JB weld for small spot putty smoothing over rusted pitting spots.It will not swell in sun and is solid as a rock. much better than bondo! I guess some people are set in thier old stubborn ways but my personal advice to beginners looking for advice here would be go ahead and use JB for small imperfections under 1/16 thick for just leveling surface. Iused JB weld to rebuild lip groove on dryer drum that turns on wheels and gets warm. the dryer drum lasted for years.

There is no replacement for common sense.
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 04:36 AM
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After removing the back glass from my Camaro I saw how much rust pitting that was under the sealant. I didn't want to cut it out because I know how hard it it to weld on thin rusted metal, so I wire brushed & sanded until my fingers were sore then filled in with JBWeld. The right way to repair would of been to get a new rear quarter panel an replace. I think JB weld has its place in body work.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 04-09-2013, 08:31 AM
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There are many other products for that rusted area and they aren't JB weld. One of the first things to think about when cleaning up a window channel is how smooth does it need to be? NOT very smooth that for sure. If the entire window channel is pitted rust but still structurally solid why smooth it out? The window sets on a bed of urethane, the metal under that urethane can be pretty darn rough, it isn't going to matter one bit if it is pitted metal cleaned properly and epoxy primed. AS LONG as it's cleaned properly and epoxy primed it doesn't need to be smooth.

Brian
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