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hotrodders.com: Project Journals: cboy's Journal
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View cboy's profile Entries: 220
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05-08-2005 08:27 PM Rat - Fuel Cell and Trunk Floor
Photo #1 I fabricated a hold down bar for the fuel cell from 1 1/4" x 1/8" flat stock with holes drilled at each end.

Photo #2 is a cockpit side view of the hold down bar installed with threaded rods at each end. The fuel cell is also held in place by the roll bar on the left side, the air dam on the back side, and the seat back (removed in the picture) on the front side.

Photo #3 shows the 3/8" aluminum fuel line (on right) plumbed to the tank and routed to the mechanical fuel pump. The green hose to the left of the fuel line vents the fuel cell out of the trunk area. The fuel cell vent also has a "tip over valve" which prevents fuel spill in the event of a roll over.


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  [Entry #185]

05-08-2005 08:10 PM Rat - Fuel Cell and Trunk Floor
Photo #1 To mount the fuel cell I first cut a piece of 3/4" particle board to fit on top of the roll bar stabilizer support framework which is shown in the prior entry. Note that the "floor" is in two separate sections. In the future I might possibly try to create a little more trunk storage space below this "floor". It's a very small, odd shaped area and will require a lot of work to fabricate the sheet metal but I designed the floor in two parts so I could access this area should I get the urge to tackle that project in the future. The floor pieces are then bolted to the roll bar support framework.

Photo #2 Next I created an "air dam" to try to keep as much air as possible flowing through the radiator rather than up and over the top. I made the air dam out of 3/4" particle board and hinged it to the existing floor section. I haven't yet quite figured out how to lock it in place.

Photo #3 shows the 16 gal. fuel cell being mocked up in place. As you can see, not much trunk space left for storage. Maybe just enough for a tarp, a small cooler(essential), rain gear, a wind breaker and a few emergency tools.


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  [Entry #184]

05-08-2005 07:51 PM Rat - Roll Bar
Photo #1 The roll bar is fabricated from 1 1/2" schedule 40 pipe. I had it bent to shape by a local shop that does custom exhaust pipe bending and has a very large hydraulic machine that produces a nice uniform bend.

Photo #2 The roll bar will be removable so I had to fabricate mounting pads for each "foot" of the roll bar and then pre drill four holes in each pad as well as matching holes in the mounting bracket. This was done before the mounting brackets were welded to the frame. This shot shows the completed installation of the driver side mounting bracket and roll bar pad. Note that the mounting bracket actually extends out from frame between the top and bottom 4-bar. Although you can't see it well in the picture, there is a minimum of 2" of travel for both the top and bottom bar - which translates to approximately 3 1/2" travel in each direction at the rear axle.

Photo #3 The roll bar is also bolted to a stabilizer support approximately 1/3 of the way up each leg. These stabilizer supports also serve as the framework for the "floor" of the trunk area and a solid base for the fuel cell.


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  [Entry #183]

05-07-2005 09:55 PM Rat - Rear Mounted Radiator
Photo #1 shows the copper plumbing in the engine area. Because the radiator is "backwards" when you mount it behind the engine, the plumbing has to cross over from its stock position. This can be done at the rear, the front, or anywhere in between. Because of space problems, I had to make the cross over at the front where I had the most room. The bottom turned out fine but the top mount and right angle of the tubing leaves a bit to be desired. The other potential problem is that the top of the pipe is at the same height as the radiator fill cap - and thus could cause an air pocket. Hopefully this can be avoided by filling the radiator while the read of the car is either jacked up or on a steep incline so that the filler neck is a couple inches higher than this pipe curve at the front of the engine. Also, at some point in the future, I hope to find a piece of radiator hose with the appropriate size and curve to eliminate the problem altogether.

Photo #2 shows the forward mounting bracket for the copper pipe (attached to bottom side of the engine mount) on the passenger side of the car. There are three mounting brackets for each pipe.

Photo #3 is a ground level view of the passenger side mounting bracket and pipe run.


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  [Entry #182]

05-07-2005 09:30 PM Rat - Rear Mounted Radiator
Photo #1 is an overhead shot showing the positioning of the rear mounted radiator.

Photo #2 One of the major challenges of a rear mount is the plumbing to the engine. This is no simple radiator hose type hook-up. Here is an overhead shot showing the 1 1/2" copper piping which runs to and from the radiator to the engine compartment. (If you have trouble making it out, the copper pipe runs parallel, and just inside, the exhaust pipe.) One piece of advice to anyone thinking of doing a rear mount...install the piping very early in the construction process. The fewer obstacles you have to go around the better. I was just barely able to squeeze the tubing in without having to zig-zag around anything. I did, however, end up awfully close to the exhaust system (it was the only area I could make a nice straight run). If I have any over heating problems I will wrap the radiator pipe with insulation in those areas where it runs closest to the exhaust piping.

Photo #3 This is the fitting for the lower radiator outlet. The entire system was cut and mounted to make sure everything fit and was then dismantled to do most of the sweating of the joints. Only the final four joints were done on the car. It is much easier to get a good solder joint when the pipe is off the car and you have no obstacles to go around with the torch and the solder. You can also see in this shot the electric fan which has been mounted and is ready to be wired up. The fan will operate in "puller" mode drawing air through the core and out toward the rear of the car.




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  [Entry #181]

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