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View Barry.M's profile Entries: 142
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11-05-2011 07:06 AM 27 T Roadster project: Underway cont.
While I was at the self-serve Auto Dismantlers I checked out some suitable Toyota's, including 4x4's for an LSD centre.

I kicked a goal when I discovered this "G285" centre in a Toyota "Bundera" 4x4. The Bundera is a SWB full sized 4x4 based on the old HJ40, except it has either the 22R petrol motor or 14B diesel engine. This one had the 22R motor and consequently (and my good luck) the smaller "G" series diff instead of the "H" series diff used by the diesel version.

Toyota diffs do not carry an ID tag on them. To identify them you have to look at the build plate on the vehicle. This will have a Transmission and Axle code.

The codes we are looking for are "G" for the 8" diff.. The next two numbers determine the ratio. 28 in this case means 4.30 ratio. 25=4.556 ratio. 29=4.10 ratio. 30=3.727. 31=3.909. The last number indicates the number of pinions in the carrier and if it has an LSD centre. 2=2 pinion non LSD and is the most common type of centre. 3=2 pinion carrier with LSD. 4=4pinion carrier and is the next most common centre found in V6 vehicles and many Toyota Vans. 5=4 pinion carrier with LSD.

Pic. 1. Toyota "G285" LSD centre-4.30:1 ratio.

Pic. 2. Close up of the 30 spline side gears and down the bottom you can see the LSD clutch pack spring pressure plate.

This centre had been pulled out at least once before me as it has some vice marks and centre punch alignment marks on the LSD carrier. Also silicone sealer had been spread arround the mounting face with no gasket.


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  [Entry #142]

11-05-2011 06:35 AM 27 T Roadster project: Underway again
It has been a long long time since my last update on the 27 T Roadster project. All of our projects for one reason or another have been "mothballed" in the last 18 months, but hopefully that will change with our circumstances beginning to improve for the better.

I had decided that the rearend that I intended using in the T Roadster would not be suitable for a number of reasons. It was a Borg Warner 78 out of a Chrysler Centura. For the US/Canadian Hotrodders not familiar with a "Centura", these were made in Australia from approx. 1974-1979. They were a french designed vehicle and were classified as a mid-sized Australian car, similar in size to a Chevy Nova of the same era.

The Centura BW78 is a popular diff in Australia for use in HotRods as they are narrow at 1435mm wide, or approx. 56-1/4". However, they are not particularly strong and a healthy 302 sized motor can blow one to bits in pretty short time. Another drawback is the cone type LSD centres wearout fairly quickly and are next to usesless after 20-30,000 Kms (approx 18,000 miles).

The problems still exist today in the current offering under the local Ford and Holden products.

The BW78 is a "salisbury" style diff, so swapping gears is a chore, not like a Ford 8" or 9" diff with removable carrier. The BW78's are not particularly nice to look at either with a stamped metal cover like a Dana44. Although you can buy a Halibrand Quickchange style ally cover to suit these diffs now.

So the decision was made, it had to go. I advertised that BW78 in a local online Classified Ad about 18 months ago and it was sold within 24 hours to a fellow Hotrodder who intended using it in his XP Falcon Coupe project.

So the search was on for a replacement diff. I considered using a GM 1955-64 diff and restudding it to Ford pattern, as I have one of these for spares, but that was rejected. Then I considered a Ford 8" out of an early Mustang. These tick all the boxes except for cost effective. Ford 9" was also considered.

Then I looked at some Japanese offerings. The Toyota HiLux type 8" or "G" series diff. looked real good. Right width at approx. 1440mm (56-1/2" ) wide and 5 stud Ford bolt pattern.

Suitable units come out of Toyota 4 cylinder and V6 2wd Commercial vehicles from 1985 to present. Quite cheap to buy and available in "HotRod" ratio's i.e. 4.10, 4.30, 4.56, 4.875. Gear sets are available from Yukon gear including 3.55, 3.70, 3.90 etc.. They have 30 spline axles and the factory LSD centres are a Tru-Trak type spring and friction plate centre. These diffs are commonly used in drift cars. Spare parts are plentiful.

Last wednesday I ventured down to the local self-serve Auto Dismantler to look for suitable unit.

Pic 1. Old Borg Warner 78 out of a Chrysler Centura, non-LSD 3.23 ratio.

Pic 2. Toyota HiLux diff complete out of a 1989 ute (utility) with 4.30 ratio centre.

Pic 3. Tape measure showing drum face to drum face measurement of 1440mm (56-1/2" ). Actual track measurement using Toyota HiLux 5.5" wide rims is 1365mm (53-3/4" ).



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  [Entry #141]

02-26-2011 04:04 AM 66 F350 Project.
Work on the F350 has progressed but very slowly. Over the last few months I have been concentrating on the fiddly bits of the project that one tends to put off. Those fiddly little bits have amounted to quite a bit of work. Plus at the moment funds are quite low so there is no opportunity for and Big or must have purchases.

We pushed, actually winched the F350 out from under the carport into the light of summer. My wife gave it a quick wash and guess what....it rained that night !. Anyway, no major leaks except for a little water getting in on the rear window seal. The Acrylic Laquer paint is now 12 months old and yet to be cut and polished.

While the truck was out I took the opportunity to reinstall all the left hand door and window seals, bailey channel, anti rattle strips etc.etc.. Door gaps readjusted.

Reworked wiring under the dash is now 90% complete. Just waiting for radio, heater and interior lights to be wired up. Plenty more to do in the cab with other fittings, carpet, seat retrim, steering wheel repair, sound deadening etc.etc..

Still plenty to do under the bonnet (hood) including finishing off of the rebuilt and modified bonnet (hood) hinges. Motor runs nice, but it is undrivable with no tailshaft. That is on the "to do" list when funds are available.

More later......



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  [Entry #140]

11-28-2010 08:05 PM 64 Impala Fuel Tank remove-install.
Back a few weeks ago the fuel gauge on the 64 Impala convertible stopped working. I discovered this whilst getting the Impala ready for the coming cruising season here in Adelaide. Don't ask why it has been so long between drives, but it has for one reason or another.

So I checked it out with a multi-meter and the gauge itself was OK but the sender was RS. Also I knew that there was about 15-20 litres of old unleaded in the tank. How old I hear you ask ?. Four (4) years old !.

The motor ran quite OK but stink !........pheeeewwww and smoky as well. Plugs are fouled to buggery, black and grungy. So stale fuel might be part of the problem. Seems as though unleaded only keeps for about 6 months, TOPS in ideal conditions and a 3/4 empty fuel tank through several hot summers is far from ideal. Also as unleaded goes off it "seperates" into a solvent and starts corroding steel and other metals. Yuk....Bring back tetra-ethyl-lead !

I have on hand two (2) good used replacement senders that I have picked up over the years.

The tank had to come out for a clean out and inspection..

Pic. 1. Fuel tank out and sender removed.

Pic. 2. Check that black grundge hanging off the float. Corrosion is evident on the brass float as well.

Pic. 3. Replacement sender with old one for comparison. New sender does not read quite the same with the existing gauge but apart from that all went back together with no problems.




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  [Entry #139]

10-19-2010 05:43 AM 66 F350 project: More rewiring.
Last weekend more rewiring of the '66 F350 was completed. A replacement fuse box was the main focus. The old 5 fuse unit was not up to it and was definately showing it's age. Also some extra fuse protection will be needed for some modern accessories yet to be installed. The old fuse box was cut out and a 10 fuse Mitsubishi type fitted on a new mounting bracket using the old fuse box holes. No need to drill any new holes in the firewall.

A straight forward install with plenty of soldering of the joints. One new power feed wire was necessary which runs up from the battery terminal at the starter motor. Notes were taken as I went along so that a new wiring schematic can be drawn up. I am sure to forget what went where 6 months down the track ?.

Pic.1. Original fuse box in position.

Pic.2. New 10 fuse box held over the top of the old unit gives you an idea how it fits in it's intended position.

Pic.3. Lid folds down for easy access to check or change fuses. What could be simpler ?.


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  [Entry #138]

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