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View willys36@aol.com's profile Entries: 206
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12-27-2004 12:03 AM '53 AD extended cab how-to47
Photo 1 is the completed headliner insert ready to install. I prime the back side of this with glue also. Can't be too generous with glue on stuff hanging over your head!

One thing I forgot to mention about using closed cell foam rubber with upholstery. It has a skin on the surface that the glue has a hard time sticking to. Simply rub the surface thoroughly with 100grit sand paper to roughen it slightly and the glue will stick great.

Photo 3 shows the rubber with the finished grooves and with the outside edge strongly tapered so there isn't an abrupt right angle at the edge of the headliner. Ready to install the cloth as before.


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  [Entry #86]

12-26-2004 11:56 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to46
The first photo shows the back side of a kick panel with 3/8" staples about every 4" into the secondary panel. These plus yellow glue hold the two panels together.

Next I attacked the headliner again. Photo 2 shows several details. First I 'primed' the whole headliner with a good coat of glue and let it dry overnight. Then I glued 1/4" sheets of foam to the spots that aren't covered by the vinyl blaze. Working off a good center line, I located one square groove path in the middle of the top. Since everything is compound curved, I had to spend special car to insure the grooves would be square and evenly spaced. Using a carpenter's square, straight edge and measurements from my initial reference line, I got the groves marked very well.

The third photo shows how I attached the chrome bead to the fiberglass insert. Since I couldn't staple the fiberglass, I had to depend on the glue alone. I sanded the chrome off the cloth tail of the beading and the glue stuck to it very well.


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  [Entry #85]

12-25-2004 11:30 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to45
There are two corner fillers between the rear side panels and the rear seat that also hold my rear 6" x 9" speakers. I made them of wood and covered the speaker hole with hardware cloth, a little heavier than screen door fabric. Photo 1 shows how I covered them in a single piece of 1/8" foam and a single piece of tweed. They both conformed very easily to the complicated shape. I cut out the foam over the speaker hole so the cloth drops into the shallow depression for a pleasing but functional appearance. The tweed is porous enough to pass the sound from the speaker but the foam would block it. You can see the sire support for the cloth over the speaker hole and some residue from Bondo I used to fillet the joint between two boards.

Photo 3 shows what I do with the little bit of polyester resin I always have left over from a fiberglass job. I tilt the can on edge and leave in the cheapie 2" chip brush to harden in place. Once cured, I pop it out of the can, smooth the sharp edges and give them to family and friends. Pretty silly but they seem to really like them!


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  [Entry #84]

12-25-2004 11:20 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to44
Remember the one-piece fiberglass headliner I made several pages ago? To cover it I decided to add a vinyl blaze down the center with pleated tweed cloth on the sides. To make the blaze, I needed a sub panel I could cover separately. Couldn't use wood or cardboard 'cause it is heavily compound curved in front so I decided to make a fiberglass one. Photos 1 & 2 show the panel in place, drying. I drew the pattern on the main headliner with a Sharpie ink pen. I covered the panel clips with small tabs of masking tape and then waxed the panel location heavily with PartAll mold release wax. I laid up two layers of mat and resin, overlapping the outline just slightly. The resin dissolved a little of the ink, transferring the shape to the new panel which made trimming to size a snap. Photo 3 is a closeup of an edged of the new sub panel showing that it is less than 1/8" thick. Very stable but also very light giving it a fighting chance of staying in place for a while, hanging in the roof of the truck.


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  [Entry #83]

12-25-2004 11:03 PM '53 AD extended cab how-to43
Here are a bunch of sheet metal trim pieces I made to cover various parts of the rim around the doors. The factory used an ugly, huge rubber welting around the doors and I wanted to use an upholstery one. Their welting fit into a steel channel that was spot riveted in place. I removed the channel and needed something to cover up the tail of th welting I am using. Photo 1 shows the front side covered in cloth and photo 2 shows the rear side and some of the sheet metal. I'll show how these go in later. I left some ends of the panel covering unattached so the cloth would slip under the head liner and door panels if I screwed up on the length of the piece.


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  [Entry #82]

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