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View steve392's profile Entries: 225
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11-30-2007 08:10 AM Willys Chassis - Exhaust System
After doing some research and investigation, I decided on two things: 1) I wanted the exhaust system to be stainless steel, and 2) I was going to have someone else do it. The decision wasn't made lightly....I would love to say when this project is done that I "did it all myself", but there are things that I can't do because of skill, equipment, and also time. The exhaust was one of those things.
One of the problems with the Willys pro-street style frame, is that it is very tough to route the exhaust all of the way out to the rear of the vehicle. The frame design, tire size, & rear suspension layout don't leave a lot of room to get a couple of 2 1/2" pipes through. This is one of the reasons that you see most Willys with exhausts that dump out just in front of the rear tires.
I was committed to getting the pipes out the back, so with that in mind, I went to get estimates for the job.
After visiting a few local shops without much success, I decided to contact Posies Rods and Customs in Pennsylvania. I had talked to the Posies guys at a few shows, and was intending to have them do other work for me later on during the build. So I asked them about an exhaust system. We met and worked out a plan for the exhaust.
They did an absolutely flawless job, something I would never be able to do myself.
Posies approach was to include a flex bellows on each side to handle any engine vibration. This also allowed the rest of the exhaust to be "hard mounted". I also had them add an O2 sensor bung on each side for an A/F ratio meter. After tuning, I can just plug them off.
The exhaust was able to be run through the frame,and stainless steel band clamps were used to make assembly/disassembly easier.



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  [Entry #55]

10-09-2007 02:02 PM Willys Chassis - Exhaust System
Now that the engine/trans/driveshaft are located and installed, my next priority is the exhaust system. As I start filling up the frame with stuff, the plan is to go from largest to smallest. Once the exhaust is routed and in, than I'll go for the plumbing. Seems like it would be easier to re-route a brake line to miss an exhaust pipe or hanger than the other way around.
Anyway, first come the headers. There are a few options for early Hemi headers, and I narrowed it down to two: shorty headers from either Hot Heads or Sanderson. I first purchased the ones from Hot Heads, and bolted them up to the block. They fit real well, and as can be seen from the first picture, there is plenty of frame clearance for the steering linkage. However, it looked like the outlet flange was kinda low. By the time I got on a mating flange, adapter and 90 degree bend, the pipe was going to be lower than I wanted.
Plan B was to check out a pair of Sanderson DD3 blockhuggers. The second picture shows the Sanderson header installed. Their design is a little different in that the collector flange is angled toward the block, whereas the Hot Heads header points straight down. Sanderson also supplied their matching flanged adapter to straighten things out.
Third picture shows a front view with the Hot Heads header on the left, and the Sanderson unit on the right. From what I'm seeing so far, I'll be going with the Sandersons. It looks like I'll have more ground clearance to the bottom of the exhaust pipe by going with them.
Its a shame, because I like the quality of the Hot Heads headers more. Better fit and finish. Either way, I'll have to sell off the ones I don't use. Not the most cost-effective way of doing things.



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  [Entry #54]

10-09-2007 01:40 PM Willys Chassis - Driveshaft
I decided to go with Inland Empire Driveline for the driveshaft. By following their directions, I measured for the length I needed. I also had to determine what size the pinion yoke was, and also the "stickout" on the transmission tailshaft. With these dimensions, I called up IED and ordered up a 3 1/2" diameter aluminum shaft with 1350 series u-joints. A week later, I had it installed. Fit perfectly, no problems. Looks good, too.


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  [Entry #53]

10-09-2007 01:32 PM Willys Chassis - Transmission
Nothing left to do but install the transmission to the bellhousing for the final time. I was working alone, so some straps and the engine hoist worked out well. I also put some long guide pins in the bellhousing holes to help line everything up.
By not having to wrestle with the weight of the transmission, and by using the guides, I was confident that I wouldn't do any damage to the pilot bearing either. It slid right in with no problem. Four bolts later, and it's all done.
One more thing I needed to do was to measure actual clearance between the throwout bearing and the clutch fingers. Actual measurement with feeler gauges came out to .110" A little tighter than planned but still more than the .100" minimum.
Second picture shows relationship between input shaft, spacer, throwout bearing and clutch assembly.
Last picture shows trans crossmember installed in frame. Pigtail on tailshaft of the Tremec TKO is the neutral safety switch connector. Now that the engine/trans combo was firmly situated in the frame, it was time to measure up for the driveshaft.


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  [Entry #52]

10-09-2007 01:16 PM Willys Chassis - Transmission
The last thing to do before bolting up the trans to the bellhousing was to install the McLeod hydraulic throwout (release) bearing.
Due to the "stack-up" of all of the parts I used, I found that I needed a spacer between the input shaft bearing surface and the back of the throwout bearing.
First photo shows the spacer installed on the input shaft. Although the hydraulic bearing has a threaded sleeve of its own, it just wasn't long enough, hence the use of a spacer first.
Second picture shows the threaded sleeve installed. The remainder of the bearing screws on to this and gives the adjustability in the overall length of the assembly. McLeod instructions call for between .100" and .300" clearance between bearing and clutch fingers. I set up the assembly for .125" clearance.
Third picture shows complete bearing assembly on input shaft, ready for final installation.


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  [Entry #51]

Pages (45): 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 [35] 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45


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