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Old 01-04-2011, 01:18 PM
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Keeping The Work Aligned?

It's not really been a problem to me until I get to corners and round areas. I've read in other places that a lot of people staple the work together in order to keep it aligned and to get an idea of how it will look. I also saw this on a Youtube video as well.
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Old 01-05-2011, 08:30 AM
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As a novice, I used staples to hold almost everything together while sewing my sedan delivery interior. I figured if temporary pins were good enough for my grandma when she sewed up her own dresses, then temporary staples were just fine by me. Here's a shot showing the technique on a gentle curved section. For tight corners the staples need to be much closer together. But even then, great care must be taken so the material does not slip, move or get bunched up.



You'll need a very stout stapler, since you'll often be attaching multiple layers including sew foam. In some areas you'll be able to simply cut the end material off along with the staples once things are sewn up. But be aware that in many places you'll need to remove all those staples by hand. So it can be a time consuming PITA.

I'm doing my boat interior over this winter and I'll be using the staple technique on that as well. And just a bit of a side note, there are a number of panels on the boat that simply pull the material over a piece of plywood backer board and staple to the back. In this case the staples are obviously left in place. So to prevent rusting and corrosion, stainless steel staples are used. Same would be true in a car, I believe, if the staples must be left in for some reason.
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Old 01-05-2011, 11:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coodeville
It's not really been a problem to me until I get to corners and round areas. I've read in other places that a lot of people staple the work together in order to keep it aligned and to get an idea of how it will look. I also saw this on a Youtube video as well.
I guess I don't understand why you are having a problem. You have your sewing machine geared down so that it barely moves, so you should be able to concentrate on the fabric and not on the sewing machine. Can you take a picture of an area that gave you problems?
You can staple or pin your work together if you want to, but holding the two pieces together with mechanical fasteners does not allow the fabric (one layer against the other) to move slightly which will create bunch ups in some areas.

No experienced sewer uses things like that. It takes more time stapling and removing staples than it's worth. FWIW, you should never leave the staples in place, they should all be removed. I learned to sew in a factory setting, and I can assure you that nothing was ever stapled together there.
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Old 01-07-2011, 09:31 AM
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Here is about the tightest radius that you will find doing a seat cover. This is an arm cover for a piece of furniture, but the concept is the same.

You always sew the smaller more curved part to the larger straight part, not vice versa. If you notice, my fingers are real close to the needle, which will keep the two pieces in line as they are sewed together. The closer you an keep your fingers to the needle the better. When you get past the curved sections, you can move your fingers farther away. You can also see that my seam allowance is 1/2" and I was able to maintain that all the way around. Does this help?
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Old 01-08-2011, 09:53 AM
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I also use staples on long curved seams to make sure the ends line up. it is a pita removing staples but I use a small screwdriver and a thumb protector to pry them out.
terry
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