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Old 02-09-2008, 04:26 PM
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Landau foam for door panels

Is it mandatory to rough up the smooth surface of the foam before you can spray the adhesive for your tweed or vinyl? The foam feels pretty smooth and I want to make the material sticks to it. Thanks

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Old 02-09-2008, 05:50 PM
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I do sand mine.
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Old 02-09-2008, 09:30 PM
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Volara foam (landau foam), when it's made, has a skin form on it. Sanding the foam breaks through this skin. Otherwise, if you glue to the smooth surface, there is a great risk that the glue will rip off the skin and let whatever covering you have release. It becomes a mess at that point. Especially when putting on an actual landau top. Not that I speak from experience or anything...like in the middle of a 37-foot top on a limo. Yikes.
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Old 02-12-2008, 05:29 AM
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Thanks guys! What grit do I use?
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Old 02-12-2008, 06:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimchevy
Thanks guys! What grit do I use?
Use a grit that is rough enough to scratch the skin surface of the foam, but not gritty enough to dig into it with gouges. probably 180 will do fine, just don't get too aggressive with it.

Vince
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:44 PM
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Vince is right!! It don't take much to mess it up.
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Old 02-12-2008, 07:51 PM
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I go a little more aggressive when sanding my foam. Using the 180 tends to slide over the surface and more risk of tearing the foam. So I very LIGHTLY sand with 80 grit wrapped around a soft sanding board. Boy, talk about a mess. All those puffs of foam sticking to everything. I'm the only one at my house who laughs when I see American Hot Rod and they are at Gabe's shop. They also do a quick comment from his son right after he's sanded a panel. Looks just like out in the shop.
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Old 02-14-2008, 11:00 AM
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Thanks!
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Old 02-16-2008, 05:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stitcher_guy
Boy, talk about a mess. All those puffs of foam sticking to everything. I'm the only one at my house who laughs when I see American Hot Rod and they are at Gabe's shop. They also do a quick comment from his son right after he's sanded a panel. Looks just like out in the shop.
Years back, a friend of mine who did a little bit of automotive painting told me that he grounds a car with a jumper cable while he's sanding on it, because it won't build up the static charge that attracts dust that way. He clips one end of the cable to the car's frame, and the other end to a pipe in his garage. He leaves it grounded until he's completely finished painting it, and swears that it helps a lot.

With that in mind, I watched my wife try to spin some high-quality silk fiber into yarn on her spinning wheel one day, and she was complaining about how the silk fibers picked up static electricity so easily. I watched for a while, and was surprised at how they wanted to fly all over the place, sticking to everything as she tried to spin it - mostly her. To cure the problem, I went out to the garage and grabbed a spool of .020 copper lockwire, wrapped one end of it around her ankle, and clipped the other end to a copper pipe under the bathroom sink with a pair of vice-grips - effectively grounding her.

You laugh now, but it worked like a charm. Grounding her dissipated the static as it formed, and she didn't look like a shaggy dog like she had before I did that.

In the garage, I've been known to clip one end of a jumper cable to a good ground source, then clip the end of an electronics worker's ground strap (about $3 at Radio Shack) to the other end of the jumper cable. I then wrap the wrist cuff of the ground strap around my ankle to ground myself while I'm sanding. If I'm wearing flip-flops, I'll just kick one of them off and step on the other end of that jumper cable while I'm sanding. I don't build up a static charge that way, and I wind up much cleaner at the end of the day.

Give it a shot - it really works.
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Old 02-17-2008, 08:28 PM
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Dusty. That is an awesome suggestion. I love it. That is the most aggravating part, trying to get the foam puffs off my hands and clothes once I"m done. That would also work when sanding foam with a grinder. All of that creates a huge static buildup, I'm sure. Especially right now in Winter with the dry air. I'll have to give it a try. I have a large roll of copper wire, in fact.

Thanks.
Russell
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Old 02-18-2008, 08:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dusty82
...
With that in mind, I watched my wife try to spin some high-quality silk fiber into yarn on her spinning wheel one day, and she was complaining about how the silk fibers picked up static electricity so easily. I watched for a while, and was surprised at how they wanted to fly all over the place, sticking to everything as she tried to spin it - mostly her. To cure the problem, I went out to the garage and grabbed a spool of .020 copper lockwire, wrapped one end of it around her ankle, and clipped the other end to a copper pipe under the bathroom sink with a pair of vice-grips - effectively grounding her.
With my luck the mother-in-law or worst yet cops would drop by for a visit. Try to explaining that!
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Old 02-18-2008, 09:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heyjude076
With my luck the mother-in-law or worst yet cops would drop by for a visit. Try to explaining that!
You know it's funny you should mention that... While I was running the wire from the bathroom to her craft room, my father called. When he asked me what I was up to, it took him a good 2 minutes to quit laughing when I told him.

That was about 3 years ago, and I still don't think he really believes me.

Russell - You'll still get foam on you, and it'll still fly all over the place, but it won't stick to you like it does now. We're in the desert (where a baby's first words are usually, "But it's a dry heat...") so we deal with dry air and static electricity all the time. People learn really quickly to hold onto the door of a car before they slide out of the seat so they don't zap the biscuits out of themselves when they grab the door to close it. Try it out and tell me what you think.

Last edited by Dusty82; 02-18-2008 at 09:38 AM.
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Old 03-01-2008, 04:11 PM
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One more question about sanding- do you need to sand BOTH sides of the foam?. Will it stick to your substrate if you don't sand it first?? Thanks!
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Old 03-02-2008, 08:29 PM
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Wherever you want it to stick, the skin has to be removed. That means both sides if you're gluing to both faces. Otherwise, you'll have a great bond between material and foam, and it could all lift off from the surface and leave you with a real mess.
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Old 03-03-2008, 07:56 PM
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Thanks stitcher guy!
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