Let's discussion the Spark plug - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Engine
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2006, 01:45 AM
Riot Racing's Avatar
Member
 

Last journal entry: Por 15
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 398
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Let's discussion the Spark plug

I have read and searched about many different brands on different motor applications. I don't want to discuss which brand/model is better than the other.

I'd like to talk about:
What makes spark plus (a) better than spark plug (b)?

When discussing longevity, why would different "types" of plugs matter, they all corrode and loose their spark strength?<--- platinum discussion?

What advantage's and disadvantages do different gap settings result?

How often should they be changes? discussing the different types: two prong, four pron, platinum, e.t.c?

thanks,
Bigman

    Advertisement
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2006, 08:25 AM
Infomaniac's Avatar
Twin Turbo Drag Boat
 

Last journal entry: Random In Progress Shots
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Locust Grove, OK
Age: 52
Posts: 372
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Not sure if this addresses all the questions or not but seems like a good opportunity to point out some misconceptions about plugs. Might help make a decision about which to buy. Or start some interesting discussion.

The primary function of the plug is to provide a gap for the spark to jump across.

The wider the gap, the more energy has to be built up to jump it. So the "spark" is hotter. It is harder on the ignition system as the gap is wider. So the gap needs to match the ignition system. For example: A typical magneto ignition only uses about a .018 gap. Even though a mag can provide a really hot spark at a decent RPM, it cannot at cranking speeds. So the gap has to be narrow so the engine will start.

Spark plug heat ranges are The operating temperature of the plug. Has nothing to do with the spark. The plug needs to operate hot enough to repel combustion deposits but cold enough to not cause pre-ignition.

Some electrode materials repel combustion deposits better than others. Like Platinum iridium etc.

A black plug like a motorcraft is difficult to read if you enjoy tuning your engine by reading the plugs. And this subject opens up a ton of misconceptions on plug reading. The color of the porcelain is the very last thing to look at is not what to look for when tuning the engine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2006, 11:06 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: WA.
Age: 57
Posts: 507
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
In the main mode, i just throw anything at it that fits within the heat range of course.

Bracket car gets what Dick Maskins at Dart wants in it. A real cold Champion.

Blown injected alcohol hemi gets NGK plated with cadmium and the plating is for reading the tune up and nothing else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 02-04-2006, 02:50 PM
vfast racer
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Va
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
to many people put so much on plugs when if you have low ohm resit wires will bring more power to the plug I use autolites and ac
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2006, 03:32 PM
Riot Racing's Avatar
Member
 

Last journal entry: Por 15
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 398
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
My take on it all:
People think that the car will preform better if there is a higher quality plug in there engine. The ONLY performance gain there would be: if you ran a platinum or iridium plug that may spark slightly hotter than an average plug. Also the platinum andiridium plugs were initially made to last longer which i would slightly agree with.

I'd prefer not to talking about the tuning and read out side from the plugs because so little people do this. Try and talk general so a general crowd understands not a specific crowd
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2006, 07:35 PM
DHMag's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: InCahoots, Texas
Posts: 302
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
in my limited but eye opening experience with spark plugs, i have noted that changing the gap will not affect performance enough to feel in your butt dyno but it will show on your mileage.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2006, 07:43 PM
SecGenLvr's Avatar
Registered User
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: tucson
Age: 28
Posts: 80
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Riot Racing
I have read and searched about many different brands on different motor applications. I don't want to discuss which brand/model is better than the other.

I'd like to talk about:
What makes spark plus (a) better than spark plug (b)?

When discussing longevity, why would different "types" of plugs matter, they all corrode and loose their spark strength?<--- platinum discussion?

What advantage's and disadvantages do different gap settings result?

How often should they be changes? discussing the different types: two prong, four pron, platinum, e.t.c?

thanks,
Bigman
As far ase strength goes, they are all pretty much the same. Platinum as far as being better has pros and cons, it is less conductant than regular plugs however platinum does not carrode it just gets coated with stuff. So to speak of longevity platinum is the way to go if you have a sand blaster to clean the plugs. Gap only effects the conductivity as well, the closer the gap, the easier it is to conduct your spark to your block, too close of a gap can burn the electrode though.
Many plugs have different options like multiple pronged plugs can come with two or four grounds. This allows you to not have to gap the plug, also it allows one ground to work when another may not.
Another problem with most platinum plugs is that the electrode is very small and has an insulator surrounding it all the way to the point of the positive side. This allows for a more affordable plug, but you need to clean it more often.
As long as they car is well maintained in a carburated vehicle they chould last 60,000 miles, in fuel injection they should last almost double.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2006, 08:48 PM
pepi's Avatar
How’s that hopey-changey thing
 
Last wiki edit: Determining top dead center
Last journal entry: Quicky frame dolly
Last photo:
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Georgia ... USA
Posts: 1,835
Wiki Edits: 8

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I find that the projector plugs work best for me , spec autolite 25 . The few things I have learned about different plug mrfgs is the heat ranges. Some have more increments of the ranges . I think I red that MSD boxes do not like the exotic coatings on the plugs and multi or split electrodes. MSD likes the old school type of plugs , for lack of a term. I did use the split fire type of plug on a harley and it did indeed improve the kick *** factor.... surprised me actually. How often to change the plugs ... that is your call the new multi spark boxes will run some nasty stuff, with that noted I change mine very often. The cam I run is hydraulic I will do the valves and plugs at 5K. I find it makes my engine hit hard and crisp , nothing like the sound of a good tune and it can be heard by the right ears from idle to red line
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2006, 10:17 PM
I dun learned sumthin
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Belle Plaine Mn
Age: 28
Posts: 248
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
With the split electrode plugs there is a problem. One of those electrodes will be closer by mabey a thousanths of an inch but electricity will always take the shortest route causing it to act like a regular spark plug. Good marketing but ineffective in real life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 02-05-2006, 10:41 PM
sbchevfreak's Avatar
Licenced Automotive Technician
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Land of big Easter eggs, Alberta
Age: 34
Posts: 1,604
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 8
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by vfast1
I use autolites and ac
Lately, Autolite makes AC Delco plugs, and NGK has a finger in that pie as well. IMHO, for a stock engine, run the OE plug. Delco/GM, Motorcraft/Ford, NGK/imports, ect. On higher performance engines, run what the builder recommends. If you're the builder, it's your call, and is a bit of trial and error. What runs well on "buddies" engine may not work well on yours, due to build differences, fuel, tune, ect.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #11 (permalink)  
Old 02-06-2006, 02:28 PM
vfast racer
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Va
Posts: 18
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by NovaSS350
With the split electrode plugs there is a problem. One of those electrodes will be closer by mabey a thousanths of an inch but electricity will always take the shortest route causing it to act like a regular spark plug. Good marketing but ineffective in real life.
there is no noticable difference. the spark will jump over to the other electrode as well...if the plug was indexed it might help. msd and other electronic boxes I think are a must on any car ..this makes for a more even flame and wider gaps in plug for a more complete combustion meaning more power...face it how many real hot rodder leave plugs alone for 100K? plat last because with the irdium on it makes it a hard and durable plug but doesn't has a large area for a better flame...they heat up fast which is a real plus....a good set of plug wires will do more than any plug you can by. really 80 bux for 8 plugs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Engine posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ignition system info................ poncho62 Electrical 18 10-11-2008 10:10 PM
Spark Plug brands question Francis Engine 65 07-15-2008 12:01 AM
recomended spark plug.. screamin340 Hotrodding Basics 2 11-18-2005 07:17 AM
Spark arcing outside the plug?? 85MonteSS Electrical 16 11-16-2004 10:02 PM
Weird spark plug situation?? Jim Weeks Engine 4 05-13-2002 07:32 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:55 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.