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Old 06-21-2010, 03:03 PM
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Looking for CH Compressor Pump Help

Hello All,

I'm currently trying to get a Campbell Hausfeld TF compressor pump to work on my compressor. I bought the pump off of CraigsList and it was sold to me as new old stock, never run. From the condition of the pump I believe this to be true.

So, got it plumbed up and turned it on. I'm getting no pressure in the tank. I have a small volume of air coming out of the tank (or pump when I disconnect the line between the pump and the tank) but it won't build pressure.

I've contacted CH and they told me it MAY be that it needs new rings or the more common cause would be the valve assembly.

My question is, is there a more definite way to trouble shoot this unit? I don't want to just through parts at it when I don't know what's wrong. You would think you could do a compression check on it (utilizing an automotive type pressure gauge) but I can't get any additional info out of CH.

How do compressor shops trouble shoot these types of issues.

Thanks in advance.

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Old 06-21-2010, 03:33 PM
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I'm no expert, but the first think I'd be looking at would be the valves. They can get rusted/corroded, and if that's the case, there will be no pressure built up.

It would seem less likely the rings would be so stuck that there'd be no pressure, but I suppose it IS possible.

You've filled it w/oil, correct?

From HERE:

"Compressors have valves that allow air to enter the cylinder area when the piston is moving down, and allow the air to be directed into the tank line when the compressor piston is on the compression stroke.

"Low cost compressors have low cost reed type valves.

"If either of these valves fails (breaks or fails to seat properly) then your compressor will run all day and never build pressure.

"If it is the intake valve that has failed, then the compressor will draw air in when the piston descends, but then that air will blow right back out of the intake valve when the piston is in the compression stroke. Air always takes the route of least resistance, so some of that air may be entering the tank, which is why the compressor reaches a threshold pressure, beyond which it won't go.

"If it's the exhaust or to-the-tank valve, air will flow into the tank on the compression stroke, but then be drawn right back out of the tank as the piston descends to try and draw more air in through the intake valve.

"A quick check is to remove the intake filter and feel if air is moving in and out of that opening. If so, your intake valve may have failed."
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Old 06-21-2010, 04:03 PM
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Thanks for the reply Cobalt327.

Without the air filter on, the pump draws strong. Will suck you hand right down on the opening. It does not blow back out of the air filter opening, so following the logic, probably not an intake valve.

It could be a exhaust valve, but I don't recall a surge of pressure followed by suction on the output. In addition, I have a check valve on the tank that will only allow air flow into the tank and not out of it (otherwise the unloader would empty the tank).

My concern is that I'm going to take it apart, not see any apparant damage / issues, then I still don't know which way to go. But, looks like that may be my only option unless someone else has ideas.

Thanks again for the reply.
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Old 06-21-2010, 04:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrankyCrankPot
I'm getting no pressure in the tank. I have a small volume of air coming out of the tank (or pump when I disconnect the line between the pump and the tank) but it won't build pressure.


Do you have a backflow valve installed between the pump and tank? If you just have the discharge line from the pump straight into the tank then you need to install that check (backflow) valve in the tank where the discharge line from the pump connects, this valve is an important part of the system and is necessary and depending on the sealing efficiency of the pump's reed valves lack of that check valve could very well cause problems. This valve is NOT optional so if it is missing you need to install one before tearing into that pump. When you say " I have a small volume of air coming out of the tank (or pump when I disconnect the line between the pump and the tank" that makes me think you do not have this valve or it is not working properly if it is installed already, you should not have air flowing out of the tank when you take that line loose even if there is pressure present.




This brings us to something else, DON'T EVER take off that line or ANY part of the pump if there is any possibility of pressure in the tank! There have been fatal accidents from doing this because most people have no idea how violently these parts can suddenly fly off when the bolts/fittings are removed and there usually is no warning at all! If you need to check for pressure on the pump-to-tank supply line then just loosen the fitting at the compressor head but only until it is loose enough to leak air do not take it completely off until you are certain there is no pressure in the tank. Take this warning seriously, I know of several serious injuries resulting from people working on compressors they thought were discharged enough.



EDIT: I see you do have that valve installed, we must have been typing at the same time.
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