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Old 03-17-2012, 09:12 AM
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Looking for info on these wheels

Hi all,

First, do they have a specific name? I've been googling using "bolt together" and "split rims" and all I find are the later style wheels. I've been halfheartedly looking for an older 1 ton or up truck and lots of them have this type of wheel....

Russ
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:40 AM
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They look like clincher rims. They have a split ring rather than a safety ring. A clincher wheel is a two part wheel. Rim and center hub.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:43 AM
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Those are Dayton wheels.
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Old 03-17-2012, 10:05 AM
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I am goimg to bow to S10 Racer. He is right and I am wrong ( Drat! That's the first time!) While booth types can separate into two pieces, clincher refers to how the rim holds the tire.
Racer does "Dayton" refer to the orig manufacturer or is it a specific type of wheel?
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Old 03-17-2012, 10:19 AM
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I've only known this style of wheel referred to as a "split rim".

I know it goes without saying here, because we all probably know this but I wouldn't feel good about any future people coming across this thread if I didn't:

These wheels (especially the 3 piece split) can be extremely dangerous if you're inflating them from low pressure. Do not try to self mount the tires using ether and step away from them when inflating. If you've ever seen the tires being replaced on these, they put them in a cage for safety while seating tires. I've been around 1950s-1980s heavy duty trucks all my life and I've met people who have been seriously maimed by split rim wheels. Be very careful.

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Old 03-17-2012, 07:42 PM
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Those are Dayton rims. This was who invented them, but they are made by a number of companies now. Two piece ring or three piece rings are pefectly safe.

The split rims that are dangerous, do not have a ring, but the rim itself splits in the middle. There is no way to tell if this type is locked properly, and are not really a Dayton rim. Don't use these. They were common on old Ford and Dodge trucks, and some military trucks.

Daytons are still made today, and are used on a lot of trucks to this day. No matter which type you use, they should be inflated in a cage. I worked in a truck tire shop, and mounted hundreds of these, every now and then one would blow up, but it's usually the tire that lets go, and not the rim.

This will tell you all you need to know about tire safety http://www.worksafebc.com/publicatio...hicle_tire.pdf

And here is a selection of rim and tire types. http://www.accuridewheels.com/completeversion.pdf

The picture below is the one to stay away from
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:02 PM
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X2 Be very careful !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by S10 Racer
Those are Dayton wheels.
X2



Quote:
Originally Posted by 5.7
I've only known this style of wheel referred to as a "split rim".

I know it goes without saying here, because we all probably know this but I wouldn't feel good about any future people coming across this thread if I didn't:

These wheels (especially the 3 piece split) can be extremely dangerous if you're inflating them from low pressure. Do not try to self mount the tires using ether and step away from them when inflating. If you've ever seen the tires being replaced on these, they put them in a cage for safety while seating tires. I've been around 1950s-1980s heavy duty trucks all my life and I've met people who have been seriously maimed by split rim wheels. Be very careful.
You are wise beyond your years and this is some very important advice given. I have changed so many of these Dayton rims and the three piece that Valkyrie has mentioned and the Budd wheels to count.
back in the 70s and in the early 80s we finely got a cage to put them in when airing them up, that was still dangerous, and yes i have seen a few come apart when put the air in. Not a pretty picture or sound in my book. If you ever have to change them let a pro do it would be your best bet IMHO. we alway's did them by hand, i'm sure they have alot better way's to do it now it has been awhile since i messed with them. But i do remember making the change from the old split rims to the tubeless rims, a whole different story and a breeze to brake down. JMO

Cole
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:18 PM
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How dangerous are split rims? I don't know but there was a guy in a truck shop near me who was welding on a rim that was mounted to a truck. The heat expanded the air and it blew, taking the top of his scull with it killing him instantly.

That "cage" they have is literally that, a "roll cage" like device, very strong to hold that mutha from flying across the shop.

Just how dangerous or how often they blow, I don't know, it may be one of those things that the gubberment has blown out of proportion (if you will pardon the pun) but I do know there is a danger, a real one.

Brian
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:56 PM
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How dangerous good question, i changed them for several years and only seen 3 maybe 4 come apart. but it does happen i alway's heard stories back then about them coming apart and killing people or hurting them very bad.
One time i saw one come apart was when a man came in wanted to air one he had changed on his own i told him if he was going to do that atleast flip it over a put the ring side down , and he did and went to putting the air in and i mean sounded like a bomb went off , i ran back outside and his pickup was still bouncing and dust was everywhere, i ran over and checked on him he was fine other then some rust got in his eye's, but he knows he was a very lucky man that day i am sure. But really how often they blow i can't say that,
just know they do at any given time. from my experience anyway.



Cole
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Old 03-18-2012, 12:46 AM
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When I worked in the tire shop, we would mount about 100 tires per day. We would have one or two blow up a week. Most were from a hidden defect in the tire that was not found by NDT before recapping. Most were tubeless tires. I recall only a couple that were from a defective rim part in mulipiece rims in about 10 years doing it.
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:46 AM
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Tire replacement and tire repair is a much more serious matter than most realize. Caging the carnage is just plain old common sense and 'gubiment does not have to put teeth into it. How many times have we watched a tire changer run the pressure up until the big "pop" occurs when the bead sets in place? Most don't even look at the gauge, but you can bet the pressure far exceeds the max pressure stamped on the tire. And how about the big truck or heavy equipment tire practice of giving a shot of ether into the cavity and using a sparkler to explode the tire in place? I'll take the cage on the other side of a strong wall anytime!!!! Having spent a career around aircraft that used 20+ ply tires rated to well over 200MPH and 200 PSI and two piece rims that were bolted together, big strong cages were a must and very high air pressure was a way of life.

Trees
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Old 03-18-2012, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trees
Tire replacement and tire repair is a much more serious matter than most realize. Caging the carnage is just plain old common sense and 'gubiment does not have to put teeth into it. How many times have we watched a tire changer run the pressure up until the big "pop" occurs when the bead sets in place? Most don't even look at the gauge, but you can bet the pressure far exceeds the max pressure stamped on the tire. And how about the big truck or heavy equipment tire practice of giving a shot of ether into the cavity and using a sparkler to explode the tire in place? I'll take the cage on the other side of a strong wall anytime!!!! Having spent a career around aircraft that used 20+ ply tires rated to well over 200MPH and 200 PSI and two piece rims that were bolted together, big strong cages were a must and very high air pressure was a way of life.

Trees
X2 with Trees on all of this. and the cage was one of the best thing's the shop ever bought us.



Cole
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Old 03-18-2012, 10:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S10 Racer
Those are Dayton wheels.
Thank you! I am now able to find some things while googling. In fact, I found a good vid on removing them and changing tires. I still don't quite understand it even after watching this several times. The rim appears to be one-piece with the tire pried off just like an automotive rim. And the guy "pre-inflates" the tire with a quick blast from a portable tank? I do like the looks of them but would prolly not want to work on them myself...

Russ
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Old 03-18-2012, 09:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by S10xGN
Thank you! I am now able to find some things while googling. In fact, I found a good vid on removing them and changing tires. I still don't quite understand it even after watching this several times. The rim appears to be one-piece with the tire pried off just like an automotive rim. And the guy "pre-inflates" the tire with a quick blast from a portable tank? I do like the looks of them but would prolly not want to work on them myself...

Russ
You're Welcome. Just be very careful with this type of wheel/tire combo if you decide to do any work with them. I would strongly suggest to anyone that don't have the experience, to take it to a shop that does. There are special equipment for dealing with these types.
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Old 04-21-2012, 08:43 PM
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split rims

I changed a couple thousand of these and we just lowered 2 arms of the lift on them when inflating. I have seen one go through a block wall...not pretty!!
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