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Old 05-11-2011, 11:42 AM
Irelands child's Avatar
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Lug nut lube

I haven't seen any discussion here on putting either a lube (white grease) or anti seize on wheel lugs. I'm not talking about my car but my travel trailer. It sits outside 24/7/365 and while I haven't had any problems yet, have to "anticipate". It does have two new axles with new drums and the lugs, 1/2-20 thread, are tighter then I would normally expect which concerns me if a bit of corrosion forms. As far as holding the wheels in place, the nuts have a 45* wedge. Of course, this could carry over to automobiles that are left out too - mine aren't .

Dave W
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:15 PM
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For years I have used a little anti-seize on my lugs. it makes them spin on and off so easy. I also put a little on the axle end flange/rotor-hub flange to keep the aluminum wheels from corroding to the steel.
The crap they use on the roads around here in the winter will eat most anything.
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
For years I have used a little anti-seize on my lugs. it makes them spin on and off so easy. I also put a little on the axle end flange/rotor-hub flange to keep the aluminum wheels from corroding to the steel.
The crap they use on the roads around here in the winter will eat most anything.
Thanks -
I use it on the wheel to hub as well - you haven't "lived" unless you have tried to loosen a 90 pound 'welded' on 275-70x18 wheel/tire from an F350. As far as the crap on the roads, NY is starting to use a liquid ice melter - that's a real mess.

Dave W
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Old 05-11-2011, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irelands child
As far as the crap on the roads, NY is starting to use a liquid ice melter - that's a real mess.Dave W
Hmm, probably Urea (sp), we used it on the runways on the AF base in Anchorage, then the city started using it on the roads...can you say "Moooo"? Nasty indeed.
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Old 05-11-2011, 03:49 PM
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I have done that with the anti sieze stuff..Good on trailer wheels and does not hurt on other wheels

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Old 05-11-2011, 05:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Irelands child
Thanks -
I use it on the wheel to hub as well - you haven't "lived" unless you have tried to loosen a 90 pound 'welded' on 275-70x18 wheel/tire from an F350.

Dave W

AND - if you have a half-finished project that needs to be transported when you move - and then life gets in the way:

One project has a 9" Ford rear end, which I tossed a couple of wheels onto so I could move it around - no brake stuff, no drums. Life happens and ten years later, you think those stinkin rims will EVER let go of the axle flanges? TIG welding is nowhere near as strong as the bond that has formed there! I may need to cut them off!
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Old 05-11-2011, 06:46 PM
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some guys will tell you that any nut/bolt/fastener combo should either have an oil or grease on the threads before before install, or sealer if the fastener goes into coolant or something that could leak past the threads, or loctite if that is called for. then torque to spec for that bolt and thread pitch. torquing actually stretches the bolt/fastener so it will stay tight and will have a spring effect. that is why they always say replace the head and rod bolts, at a minimum, on an engine rebuild. also, a lube will help you get actual torque instead of actual torque plus whatever drag there is on the dry threads. it will also help to stop galling of the two metal parts upon dissassembly.
I personally always use anti-sieze on all my wheel bolts,front wheel drive axle splines, axle flanges, backsides of brake roors and drums where they mate up the the axle flanges, etc etc. especially goopy on the flange with a alloy wheel or anything that has 2 different kinds of metals. but that is just me going overboard again.
dsraven
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Old 05-11-2011, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
For years I have used a little anti-seize on my lugs. it makes them spin on and off so easy. I also put a little on the axle end flange/rotor-hub flange to keep the aluminum wheels from corroding to the steel.
The crap they use on the roads around here in the winter will eat most anything.
^^^^^^^^^x2
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Old 05-11-2011, 07:14 PM
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Antisieze on the lug nuts.

I broke two lugs on the wife's Honda Civic before it hit me to start using it.
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Old 05-11-2011, 07:55 PM
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Tomorrow AM, out comes my can of antisieze, my torque wrench and I'll 'fix' those lugs - thanks for confirming what I figured was the right way.

Dave W

PS: 68 Nova urea is generally fertilizer and is nasty - I've been in a couple urea producing plants and everything made out of steel rots.
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Old 05-12-2011, 04:25 AM
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Some makes it good, but a lot don't make it better. And make sure no anti seize gets on the lug seats.
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Old 05-12-2011, 04:35 AM
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The problem w/using a compound or lube on wheel studs/nuts is the torque values given are for clean, dry threads. Adding a lube can cause the wheel to be over torqued.
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Old 05-12-2011, 05:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by el pollo
Some makes it good, but a lot don't make it better. And make sure no anti seize gets on the lug seats.

Getting it on the seats should not be a problem and in fact it works great to help keep the seats on Aluminum wheels from galling, with maybe the exception of the Alloy/Aluminum wheels there is no benefit to allowing it on the seats however. For many years I just used plain old grease or even motor oil on wheel studs/lugnuts and that works quite well, however I keep a large bottle of Permatex Antisieze on hand now and use it on almost everything.
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Old 05-12-2011, 09:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cobalt327
The problem w/using a compound or lube on wheel studs/nuts is the torque values given are for clean, dry threads. Adding a lube can cause the wheel to be over torqued.
I always go with the low end on the torque value recommendations on mine.
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Old 05-12-2011, 10:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ownerT
For years I have used a little anti-seize on my lugs. it makes them spin on and off so easy. I also put a little on the axle end flange/rotor-hub flange to keep the aluminum wheels from corroding to the steel.
The crap they use on the roads around here in the winter will eat most anything.
same here, i learned this way starting out in the 70s
plus i put it on the hub and flange of drums and rotors.
saves you a lot of hammering on them.
i too live in salt country, everything rusts solid


as for torque values: i worked for a dana heavy axle plant in the 80s in a plant that built truck rearends.
we were taught that torque values are on lubricated threads
all of our assembly bolts came pre-lubricated
we had millions of bolts in the plant, all pre-lubed
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