Is this machine any good?? - Page 3 - Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board
Hotrodders.com -- Hot Rod Forum



Register FAQ Search Today's Posts Unanswered Posts Auto Escrow Insurance Auto Loans
Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board > Tech Help> Interior
User Name
Password
lost password?   |   register now

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #31 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2011, 10:46 AM
DanTwoLakes's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Contact adhesive
Last journal entry: 49 Packard
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin
Age: 64
Posts: 5,900
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 152 Times in 139 Posts
Any full service hardware store should have a 3L belt, or a Tractor Supply, Fleet Farm, or Farm & Fleet.

    Advertisement
__________________
__________________________________

No one lives forever, the trick is creating something that will.
__________________________________
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
  #32 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2011, 11:21 AM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: NYC
Posts: 830
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 16
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
Any full service hardware store should have a 3L belt, or a Tractor Supply, Fleet Farm, or Farm & Fleet.
If you live in the city like I do, you might have to venture out a little.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #33 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2011, 05:39 PM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
I got one !!! I went over to O'Riely's auto parts just down the street.

The young guy had his fingers on the keyboard when he asked if he could help me. I just couldn't resist pranking him. So I said " Yes, I need a new belt....a 3/8 cog style v-belt". He says "what for?" His fingers were just itching on the keyboard. So I said " It's about a 1990 Consew 226". He quickly keyed in something then replied " I don't see that listing" With a straight serious face I said " probaby not, it's sewing machine". He looked at me with a big funny look and smilled. He says "Come on let's go look in back".

He knows me as I go there quite often. I got him once before looking for valve cover gaskets for a 41 Willys.

Anyway I got the belt. I think I'll go up to the fabric store and get a couple yards of material to practice on after dinner.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #34 (permalink)  
Old 04-14-2011, 10:15 PM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
@#$% First of all the belt is too short. No problem take it back in the morning.

Next the belt will hit the right edge of the table. There is only 1/2 inch at best to move the motor. Maybe it will be enough. It looks like I could turn the pulley around or possibly push it on the shaft a little farther. It will be close. It could be turned around on the shaft also with the set screw and hub out or to the right. I have to bring tools home to do this. This is what was causing the rubbing sound and probably what caused the original belt to break.

There was a lot of thread wound around the shaft. Got that off. I also found a brand new bobbin in the belt guard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #35 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2011, 07:06 AM
Dusty82's Avatar
Member
 

Last journal entry: The Chevy Bench Seat - Part 52
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern Nevada
Age: 53
Posts: 306
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Turning the pulley around will probably be the best bet. Mine is set up with the set screw hub facing outward because I had to do the same thing to keep the belt from rubbing the table.

My wife used to love pranking the parts guys a bit too. She'd take a single spark plug and V-belt into the shop with her and ask for a new one. When they finally asked what they were for, she'd tell them. A 1980 Maytag Wringer-Style Washing Machine with a 5hp Briggs & Stratton engine. She got a lot of mileage out of discussing how she changed the oil in it as well...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #36 (permalink)  
Old 04-15-2011, 07:38 AM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Haha that good. I had a B&S washing machine motor on my first putt putt...go kart about 1950.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #37 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2011, 08:21 PM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
I turned the pulley around and that solved the alignment problem.

I picked up 3 yds of some heavy vinyl for $3 a yd to practice on at the fabric store just down the street.

Dan, thanks for the pictures showing how to thread this machine. The post on the top is a problem as it has been tightened past the correct position and is dead loose if I back it off. It seems to work ok if I just use one hole. I think the cure will be to Locktite in the correct position so it works right. I'll bring my thread locker home tomorrow.

My first attempts were disappointing as the seam was very loose and the work curled up sharply after the foot. I tried adjusting the tension from soft to all the way tight bottomed out and nothing happened to the stitch.

After about a dozen rows the bobbin ran out. I have 3 boxes of new pre wound bobbins so I put in a new one. Boom... the stitch was so tight that it nearly cut thru both layers of material before it broke the thread about 9 inches into the row.

I backed the tension off and started over. some improvement. So I backed it off more. Even better. After this I was able to make adjustments about every foot or so until it looks pretty even on both sides. When I try to peel the two pieces apart you can barely see the thread even pulling hard. I think it is pretty close now. I was able to run a number of rows not exactly straight but at least the material lays flat and is not bunched up. It's exactly 5 stitches per inch. I measured my vinyl covered Ottoman and that's what it is too and it looks good. I think I need the next heavier thread and needle. I have 69.

I don't know exactly why the change in bobbin made the difference since they came out of the same box. The thread from the first one was curled where this one is nice and straight like the needle thread. There may have been something stuck in the tensioner. I haven't had it apart however.

Now I know how my beginner welders feel when they make some progress.

I got a marker and seam cutter today. My goal is to practice 4 hours a day. I'm starting by trying to follow the mark and use reverse to lock the seam.

I'll try and post some pictures after I get beyond the laughing stage. haha
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #38 (permalink)  
Old 04-16-2011, 09:19 PM
Member
 
Last photo:
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: NYC
Posts: 830
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 16
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Have you had a mechanic check this machine out?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #39 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 07:58 AM
DanTwoLakes's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Contact adhesive
Last journal entry: 49 Packard
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin
Age: 64
Posts: 5,900
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 152 Times in 139 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by bentwings
I don't know exactly why the change in bobbin made the difference since they came out of the same box. The thread from the first one was curled where this one is nice and straight like the needle thread. There may have been something stuck in the tensioner. I haven't had it apart however.
Probably because you didn't have the thread engaged with the little spring steel tension on the bobbin case. When you pull on the bobbin thread, you should feel some resistance. If you don't, the bobbin's not loaded correctly.
__________________
__________________________________

No one lives forever, the trick is creating something that will.
__________________________________
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #40 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 10:06 AM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
I think you are right. Thread from the first bobbin pulled out after a seam very easy. Even just pulling a little extra out was easy. Now there is noticeable drag.

The bobbin that was in the machine when I got it had the paper flange removed on the top side as installed. I replaced it with a new one after removing the paper. This may or may not have caused some or the start up problems. I now just put them in as made since the steel ones have both flanges it follows that the paper ones should too..

This brings up another point. After I installed the new cogged v-belt, I discovered that the clutch not only engages but is also a brake for the machine. I should have known as the same type of clutch/brake is often used in my former life as automation engineer. I did adjust the belt so the heavy motor doesn't just hang on the belt. I pinched the belt together a little as I tightened the adjuster. There is a little deflection in the belt, I wouldn't want my alternator belt like this but they are made for heavy tension, I don't think it would be a good idea to have heavy tension as the bearings probably can't handle this. It's very hard to slip the belt with the handwheel.

Also the clutch has a neutral position controlled with the foot pedal so you can rotate the handwheel to the top position after a seam. You probably did this automatically in the pre servo motor days.

It takes quite a tug to pull out both threads after a seam. The machine needs to be in just the right position but it still takes too much to pull it out. It is consistent but I think it is too much. What can I do to adjust this???

Thanks for all the help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #41 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 10:41 AM
DanTwoLakes's Avatar
Hotrodders.com Moderator
 
Last wiki edit: Contact adhesive
Last journal entry: 49 Packard
Last photo:
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Lake Tomahawk, Wisconsin
Age: 64
Posts: 5,900
Wiki Edits: 22

Thanks: 0
Thanked 152 Times in 139 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by bentwings

It takes quite a tug to pull out both threads after a seam. The machine needs to be in just the right position but it still takes too much to pull it out. It is consistent but I think it is too much. What can I do to adjust this???

Thanks for all the help.

There isn't anything you need to adjust. You need to lift the foot as high as it will go with the knee lifter and hold it up which releases the tension disks on the top thread tension. Then the thread pulls out easy. Raise the foot with the knee lifter and watch the two tension disks as you do it. You can see the two disks come apart. If it doesn't do this, the rod that releases the disks is worn down and it needs to be replaced. This is an easy minor repair that you can do yourself.

99% of the time when the machine doesn't sew properly, it is operator error, and the machine doesn't need to be adjusted.

It doesn't matter if the paper disks are on the pre-wound bobbins or not. I have pre-wound bobbins that don't come with paper disks on them, and they work just fine.

The braking action you are talking about holds the machine when the foot pedal is pushed down at the heel. This is a mechanical braking and not an electric braking which is what is used in industrial applications. Companies like Warner Electric Brake and Clutch and Electroid were makers of these types of clutch brakes. Clutches disengage a load from its power source, and brakes stop a load. Servo motors on sewing machines do not have this feature and it makes absolutely no difference in operating the machine.
__________________
__________________________________

No one lives forever, the trick is creating something that will.
__________________________________

Last edited by DanTwoLakes; 04-17-2011 at 10:55 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #42 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 10:49 AM
Dusty82's Avatar
Member
 

Last journal entry: The Chevy Bench Seat - Part 52
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern Nevada
Age: 53
Posts: 306
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanTwoLakes
99% of the time when the machine doesn't sew properly, it is operator error, and the machine doesn't need to be adjusted.
I hope to shout! I'm the poster child for that statement!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #43 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 01:05 PM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
Ok so I just operated the knee lifter as you said and sure enough the discs move. Not much but definitely an improvement. I think this 'rod' is worn so I think it would be best to replace it.

I did find part numbers so I thinkI'll get one tomorrow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #44 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 01:23 PM
Dusty82's Avatar
Member
 

Last journal entry: The Chevy Bench Seat - Part 52
Last photo:
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Northern Nevada
Age: 53
Posts: 306
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Do know that when you go to thread your machine you need to make sure the presser foot is locked in the UP position. That opens those tensioning disks to allow the thread to slip between them while you're threading it. I didn't know that when I first started out and it caused me no end to tensioning problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
  #45 (permalink)  
Old 04-17-2011, 01:52 PM
bentwings's Avatar
bentwings
 
Last photo:
Join Date: May 2002
Location: St.Paul, Minn
Age: 72
Posts: 1,796
Wiki Edits: 0

Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 15 Posts
I discovered that after Dan's post above. There are actually 2 positions....up and all the way up. I just didn't lift hard enough. I cleaned and oiled the cam so it works smoother.

I need to get more proficient with the knee lifter. I'm going to work on it tonight during my "training session".

Thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

Recent Interior posts with photos

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name (usually not your first and last name), your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Looking for a good machine shop in N.C. comet2door Engine 1 08-23-2010 01:40 PM
Are there any good machine shops dragginby Engine 0 04-02-2008 11:48 AM
Good Machine Shop(s) in L.A.? swerve Engine 7 12-23-2004 10:56 AM
Looking for a good machine shop. Dr.Feelgood Hotrodders' Lounge 1 11-13-2004 10:42 PM
Any good machine shops in San Diego? malibu65ss Hotrodders' Lounge 0 09-17-2002 04:44 PM


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.