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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 12-25-2008, 06:45 AM
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The only time I have cracked a Craftsman socket was when I used a 1/2" breaker bar with an extension pipe, or used my impact wrench with it...duh . I'm not trying to claim Craftsman is better than Snap-On or any other brand. All I'm saying is there are literally thousands of auto mechanics out there making a living using Craftsman tools and they are serving them well. Not everyone needs to invest $20K+ in a huge bright shiny box full of chrome plated tools.

Vince

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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 12-25-2008, 07:00 AM
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while I cant say what I do to maintain my snap on wrenches, or my mac ratchets...I Don't own any, I've got a Kennedy box full of Brown and Sharpe, Mitutoyo, Tesa, starrett, and hand made precision (some of them down to .00005") ground tools that require a lot of care...I'm talking if you drop it its a write off. All the bare metal, and there's a lot of it gets wiped off with a clean rag, with acetone if need be, and hit with WD 40. The drawers have desiccant packets. Nothing (mic's calipers, etc) is stored with the measuring faces together. nothing is kept locked, or with any tension on it for any period of time. most items have their own case they are kept in which is in turn kept in my box. And to top it all off everything is independently calibrated occasionally to make sure I do a good job of taking care of my stuff...I even got ahold of the roll of calibration stickers and put one on my calculator .

my personal mill, lathe, band saw, etc, all get the same treatment...except having their own case to be kept in...that would be a big case. but all the bare metal gets coated with WD 40 when not in use, everything stays lubricated, the mill even has a nifty set up that you fill with way oil, give it a pump and it oils everything. Nothing stays locked, when it sits idle for any period of time I move all of the axis's and fire up the spindles on occasion. The CNC machines at work stop in their tracks when the lube tanks get low. they say forget you buddy, you oil me up then i'll go back to doing what I'm doing but not before.

It was hard to make the transition from working on bulldozers to precision stuff but its really helped with my patience and attention to detail...although I still momentarily revert to get a bigger hammer mode every now and then.
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 12-25-2008, 07:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 302 Z28
All I'm saying is there are literally thousands of auto mechanics out there making a living using Craftsman tools and they are serving them well.Vince

To be fair you are talking about auto mechanics and I have to admit I am thinking bulldozers but then it was the smaller more common sizes I was talking about. The strange part is the big stuff from 3/4" drive up works just fine out there and even though things like sockets are somewhat thicker than, say, Snap-On I have never seen that to be a problem on the larger stuff. Honestly it was not just brand loyalty and if the Craftsman tools (mainly sockets and ratchets) would have done the job they would have been used more often. As far as cracking sockets I cracked a 1/2" drive 12 point (24 MM IIRC) trying to remove an oil plug in the side of a Ranger Truck 5 speed transmission without using a breaker bar. The fellow I was with who owned the tools had one of those Craftsman sets in the black plastic fold-up case and out of the 3/8" set 3 of the sockets were cracked (12 point). Honestly I am not making this up and I just could not imagine a Proto or Snap-On cracking on that oil plug. I have always said that not everyone needs to buy Snap-On, etc but when someone's job depends on them it may be a different story.


There has been a recent discussion here about the problems (impossibility?) of getting the Snap-On warranty honored and by coincidence he is from my area. It seems there is more than one person with that problem and Snap-On is increasingly getting bad-mouthed by more than just this guy so they may be headed for trouble. I hope it is just a local thing but the problems he has had getting help from the regional office does not look good and I think maybe I personally would be hesitant to invest that kind of money in tools that might be orphaned before long.
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  #19 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 07:50 AM
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I have had no prob with snap on in our area. I still buy from him as necessary. Actually more than before because he and the cornwell guy are the only two that show up weekly without fail. I still have craftsman in my tool box at work and they work great when i need them, but i have traded some of them down to home use only.
The story of the guy who meticulously polished and replaced tools in his box sounds a little like a guy i work with. He doesn't polish and put back but he just bought the fanciest new snap on box with a lockable top compartment for a lap top and a power strip, yet he doesnt have some of the necessary tools for everyday work. Most of us in the professional auto repair trade seem to be of the opinion that you prob shouldn't buy a bigger or fancier tool box until yours is full and you can work on your own without asking for help all the time. anyway i wont get into that any further.
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  #20 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 08:30 AM
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Just use them enough and your hands will keep them polished.
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by 61bone
Just use them enough and your hands will keep them polished.


LOL, That'al work!

All joking aside there seems to be a bit of a misunderstanding between simply "freshening up" the finish on a tool set occasionally and spending time polishing on the tools everyday. I like to keep my tools clean and occasionally I will change the liners in my box and thoroughly clean everything including going so far as to buff some of them if the finish is scratched and/or dull followed by a shot of WD40, this is not something that is done everyday however.
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 10:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trees

Now if I could just find a great set of old Snapons at a widow's garage sale....!!!!

Trees
I had a bunch of tools stolen and I did happen to find replacements at this type of sale. Fair assortment of snap-on and matco. Pretty lucky really.

I have a little of everything but back in the aviation days, removing the exhaust manifold nuts, nothing else would squeeze in there but a snap-on 12 point flex socket. The others were just too thick. I still look at those and say no way, but they would bust em loose every time without breaking.

For $$ reasons I sold my snap-on roller back when and later replaced it with a craftsman. Like someone mentioned, the drawers will fall off the tracks occasionally if I'm not careful. Maybe too much junk in them, LOL. I'm gonna get rid of it down the road when a few extra bucks come in.

Never saw much use in cleaning and polishing. If they get greasy, I soak em, clean em and wipe with a rag and machine oil.

As a side note..........I have noticed the snap-on guys getting a little fussier. Hope that's not a sign of things to come........
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 10:19 AM
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Maintiantence on anything keeps them functioning and looking good. It is part of the time/investment one puts into his overall appearance/professionalism.

Well maintained tooling shows that the owner cares enough about his items to also take care of their customers items.

As to using Sanp On tools, if one works with anyting long enough they find out that the "beater sockets, ratchets, extensions etc" break and do not fit on LOTS of fastners, and the wrenches have way to big, of ends to fit many places. Then one ends up trying to "borrow a Snap On one" to do the job.

As to Snap On warranties, some of the individual dealers (independent contractors) try to pull the "if I did not sell it I will not warranty it" trick. All it takes is about 3-4 written complaints and that dealer gets to go sell Chrapsman at Sears. The 800 number SnapOn guys will overnight free if they catch a dealer screwing around with a good customer.

Snap On has recently made a decision to make a judgment call as to used tools ownership and will never deny warranty to the origional owner. If you did not buy it new they may not replace it. If you have other Snap On tooling they rarely deny exchange. This was done because some of the warranty return items Snap On was scrapping, were showing back up on Ebay for sale. Snap On always puts a "grind mark" on the origional replaced tools and the ebay sellers were listing them as "grind marks destroying the origional owners id" marks.

MY Crapsman tools also get maintenance. I use the power wire brush to bring the new finish back to the beater stuff I use to lend out. When someone breaks them they get to drive to Sears to get the replacement.

In the example above with the guy using the pipe on a ratchet, to extend its strength, that is why Sears has to make their tools physically bigger, so this type or idiot does not kill himself or some close.

Last edited by OHD; 12-27-2008 at 10:25 AM.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 10:35 AM
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[QUOTE=OHD
In the example above with the guy using the pipe on a ratchet, to extend its strength, that is why Sears has to make their tools physically bigger, so this type or idiot does not kill himself or some close. [/QUOTE]


Oh come on man! You never did that ever?

Sometimes we do stupid stuff in the heat of the moment..
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 10:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OHD
Snap On has recently made a decision to make a judgment call as to used tools ownership and will never deny warranty to the origional owner. If you did not buy it new they may not replace it. If you have other Snap On tooling they rarely deny exchange. This was done because some of the warranty return items Snap On was scrapping, were showing back up on Ebay for sale. Snap On always puts a "grind mark" on the origional replaced tools and the ebay sellers were listing them as "grind marks destroying the origional owners id" marks.

In the example above with the guy using the pipe on a ratchet, to extend its strength, that is why Sears has to make their tools physically bigger, so this type or idiot does not kill himself or some close.
Interesting to know, as was the written complaint remark.

I think we've all used a cheater bar at times. The longer the bar you're using...........look around at what you're gonna hit, because something's gonna break loose..........
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 11:41 AM
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Polish tools???..........

I still have the Husky socket set that I bought 40+ years ago..........plus some of my dads Snap-on stuff from years before that.......Scratches in them are just war wounds...............
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 12:27 PM
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My tools - all of them, including the Snap-ons, MACs, S-Ks and the Craftsman, etc are always wiped totally clean of any crud, and if they got wet somehow, a shot of WD-40, then a good wipe down. They are either lined up by size in a drawer or in the case of my Sears stuff, hung, again by size and/or type on a pegboard. Beater tools - I don't buy junk from Korea, Taiwan, India or China, etc unless it's a unique, single use, never to be seen/used again. I'm not anal enough to polish them....... I also NEVER lend tools to anyone without me being attached

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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 05:42 PM
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For what it's worth, US Air Force Jet Engine shops are stocked with Snap-On tools. They are provided by a contract which is really a good deal for Snap-On, The USAF and the tax payer (and mechanics of all types). Jet engines require a lot of special tools and strong, thin wall sockets and end wrenches are the more common one. You should see the tool boxes in these shops. First, they are all arranged identically, drawer by drawer. Secondly, each and every tool is in it's place. Third, ever tool is assigned a number that is engraved on it, which identifies it with each individual tool box. Each mechanic checks his box out starting a shift and checks it back end at the end of the shift. He checks to make sure every tool is in the box before he starts to work, and every tool is replaced when he checks the box back in. If one is missing, nobody leaves until that missing tool shows up. First, you can't risk a 2 Million dollar engine grenading from a socket whirling around in it, or a 100,000 million dollar aircraft crashing from a trashed engine in flight. Second, pilferage of high dollar tools that the tax payers have bought is frowned upon!!!! This is the best tool program I have ever seen.

Trees
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 12-27-2008, 05:48 PM
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I guess that proves Snap On tools don't grow on TREES.....
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 12-28-2008, 02:44 PM
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when i first started out, i did heavy line work.
i had a craftsman roll cab & the top box for it, both full of craftsman tools.
the sockets broke, the wrenches rounded off nuts & bolts.
fighting a rounded bolt is what made me try a Snap-on wrench. from that day i haven't bought another craftsman tool for on the job use.
i learned, craftsman wrenches and sockets just were not up to the task.
i started filling the craftsman boxes with Snap-on tools. that was back in 1977.
when those boxes got too small, they were replaced with a Snap-on box with roller bearing drawers.
with Snap-on, very seldom do i have a problem with a rounded nut or bolt. i've had to replace fewer broken Snap-on sockets in the last 30 years than i had to replace in that first month when i worked with craftsman sockets.

i wish i only had $20,000 invested in my tools.
i clean my tools before they go back in the box every time.
sometimes when its slow, i wax them.
i clean and wax my boxes too.

now that i no longer do heavy line, the craftsman boxes are back at work & the Snap-on boxes came home.
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