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  #16 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2006, 05:29 PM
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if a guy found a good used marine block would it make a good street/strip block/motor ? are the marine blocks all forged bottom ends ?









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  #17 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2006, 06:04 PM
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Marine vs Auto

i.m no expert but what experiance i.ve had with marine eng is that they are like the truck engines and industrial engines. If it is a chevy its probaly got 4 bolts mains etc bigger valves cam etc.If its a Ford it also is like their truck motor. In the boats they arn't as strict with emissons and they use water cooled manifolds.The marine eng is toughter but if you used it reasonable the auto eng will work. I guess it depends a lot on what you want to do with the boat. Mur 39
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  #18 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2006, 06:09 PM
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some marine engines do have coated water passages but not all. boats with heat exchangers do not. a heat exchanger is a water cooled radiator basicly. there are 2 tanks, 1 inside the other, the coolant is on the inside tank, water is pumped around the inside tank from the lake/ ocean water, and only the coolant is in the engine.
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Old 08-05-2006, 08:31 PM
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the marine 305 that i worked on where no different than a car block. The 350 blocks where hp or truck blocks. 4 bolt mains steel cranks but nothing else special.
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Old 08-05-2006, 09:20 PM
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The difference between the two engines is in the thickness of the castings. Because the marine engines can be sucking in salty water the castings need to be a little thicker so as not to get "eaten" up too fast. Other than that they are the same block. Things that get bolted to the block are different but could be used in either application such as the windage tray, deep sump oil pan that kind of stuff.

Scholman
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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2006, 10:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scholman
The difference between the two engines is in the thickness of the castings. Scholman




would make a good race block/motor then ?







Mustangsaly
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Old 08-05-2006, 11:01 PM
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The majority of marine engines are based on auto engines. All merc 5.7 are 2 bolt mains where as crusader uses 4 bolt mains. The basic difference in the auto/marine engine is brass freeze plugs, SS head gaskets and a cam with torque that peaks in the 2000-2500 rpm. Of course, with a higher rpm torque peak the HP will be a little higher. Too high torque peak and the boat will not be able to get on plane even if it has impressive HP. Roller cam 5.7 can rev to 5000 rpm but hydraulic will be 4200-4600 rpm.

Most cranks are cast and the pistons are hyperutectic but as in any Hiperf set-up a forged crank, con rods and pistons are preferred.

Oh, and the blocks come right off the GM assembly line.
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 08-06-2006, 01:39 AM
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when i got my chevy 327 it was pulled from a boat, all the casting numbers say it was from a 67 camaro. complete numbers matching motor. only thing it had omc marine exhaust manifolds on it, and the crossmember from a boat. what are the odds that this motor spent its whole life in a boat? or would have marine companies changed such things as the intake manifold or the heads. i was just curious if this actaually ever lived in a camaro, other than mine.
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Old 08-06-2006, 05:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by njbloodline666
when i got my chevy 327 it was pulled from a boat, all the casting numbers say it was from a 67 camaro. complete numbers matching motor. only thing it had omc marine exhaust manifolds on it, and the crossmember from a boat. what are the odds that this motor spent its whole life in a boat? or would have marine companies changed such things as the intake manifold or the heads. i was just curious if this actaually ever lived in a camaro, other than mine.
Probably came straight from the boat. Both Ford and Chevy supplied marine engines right from the production line, with unique bolt-ons (e.g. manifolds, carb, windage tray) but standard block, crank, rods.... when I worked in Lima around the 460 line the marines and motorhomes rolled right through with the truck motors, just different bolt-ons, and the old 302 line was the same.
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Old 08-06-2006, 07:33 AM
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Unless the 327 came a 60's era boat, chances are it could have come out of a car. But like I said, marine engines come straight from the auto mfg. There is no special alloy incorporated into the casting.
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 08-06-2006, 09:02 PM
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well either way, all the castings say 67 camaro and i got the motor for 100 bucks, so if someone is doing a resto it might be worth something. but right now i get to enjoy this motor until the 383 stroker that was in my car is back an running.
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 08-06-2006, 10:30 PM
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I'm an AMC fan and just got through researching the history of Graymarine, a boat engine builder from the early 1900s through 1966. They made some of their own engines early on before there were many car engines to convert, but by the 30s they were converting auto and industrial engines. Graymarine provided a lot of engines to ChrisCraft before the 50s (when CC started doing their own industrial engine conversions), and many wood runabouts through the end. They used Continental industrial engines forthe most part, the same 226 flat head used in Kaiser-Frazer auto was popular. They also used AMC 250, 287, and 327 V-8s. So if you see a 327 in an old boat, it just might be an AMC engine! It will look like more like a big block though.

Anyway, the engine block and internals were the same as their atuomotive counterparts with the exceptions mentioned by jtybt. Brass freeze plugs, stainless head gaskets (or non corrosive metals, not sure what they used before stainless was so common), and special cam. The intakes and carbs were different as well as the exhaust manifolds and cooling system routing. The coating in the water jackets was a special option, not normally used. Some of the coatings were aftermarket. If the boat comes out of the water the cooling system should be flushed regularly, more so when in salt water. I'd think the coating would be worth it for a large work boat that stays in the water year round. Boat engines do tend to run warmer than car engines because they are closed up in the engine bay with out as much ventilation, but the exhaust is water cooled also.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jtybt
The majority of marine engines are based on auto engines. All merc 5.7 are 2 bolt mains where as crusader uses 4 bolt mains. The basic difference in the auto/marine engine is brass freeze plugs, SS head gaskets and a cam with torque that peaks in the 2000-2500 rpm. Of course, with a higher rpm torque peak the HP will be a little higher. Too high torque peak and the boat will not be able to get on plane even if it has impressive HP. Roller cam 5.7 can rev to 5000 rpm but hydraulic will be 4200-4600 rpm.

Most cranks are cast and the pistons are hyperutectic but as in any Hiperf set-up a forged crank, con rods and pistons are preferred.

Oh, and the blocks come right off the GM assembly line.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 08-07-2006, 05:30 AM
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no difference in the block... same block you got in your pickup truck... i've gone through quite a few and GM doesn't even give them any "extra" bore clearance. there is nothing special about any merc standard sbc. except for the use of a windage tray, dipstick tube that extends to the bottom of the pan and SS core head gaskets for use in saltwater.
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Old 08-07-2006, 08:22 AM
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Not much discussion here on repairing this block, thought I would throw in my little experience from a few years back. I always winterized my 18' fiberglass runabout myself. One fall, I did not notice one the petcocks on the left side of the block stripped it's threads and did not let the water from that side drain out. In the spring as I was reinstalling various drain plugs and preparing for start-up, I noticed a big rusty streak on the side of the block! I was horrified, and quickly discovered what had happened with the stripped petcock. This resulted in about a 2 inch crack in the side of the block. Well, figuring I had nothing to loose by trying this, I cleaned the paint off of the block with paint stripper, took a die grinder and roughed up the block real good, cleaned again with acetone, and took some of this two part hand moldable epoxy and made a patch over the crack. I even took the knurled end of a ratchet and textured the epoxy to resemble the roughness of the rest of the block. Spray painted black and the patch blended in real well! Never leaked a drop. Ran that boat for at least 8 years that way with no trouble at all. This was on a Merc 898 in and out, 305 SBC. Not saying this will work in your case, but it beat the heck out the alternatives. Good luck with yours,
L.D.
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  #30 (permalink)  
Old 08-08-2006, 07:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eldee
Not much discussion here on repairing this block, thought I would throw in my little experience from a few years back. I always winterized my 18' fiberglass runabout myself. One fall, I did not notice one the petcocks on the left side of the block stripped it's threads and did not let the water from that side drain out. In the spring as I was reinstalling various drain plugs and preparing for start-up, I noticed a big rusty streak on the side of the block! I was horrified, and quickly discovered what had happened with the stripped petcock. This resulted in about a 2 inch crack in the side of the block. Well, figuring I had nothing to loose by trying this, I cleaned the paint off of the block with paint stripper, took a die grinder and roughed up the block real good, cleaned again with acetone, and took some of this two part hand moldable epoxy and made a patch over the crack. I even took the knurled end of a ratchet and textured the epoxy to resemble the roughness of the rest of the block. Spray painted black and the patch blended in real well! Never leaked a drop. Ran that boat for at least 8 years that way with no trouble at all. This was on a Merc 898 in and out, 305 SBC. Not saying this will work in your case, but it beat the heck out the alternatives. Good luck with yours,
L.D.
I know a couple of people who have made this work as well. And I have a friend who repaired his rusty oil pan on a 5.0L Econoline (they had a lot of those) with fiberglass and West System epoxy. That was 3 or 4 years ago and he is still driving it to work every day.
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