Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board

Hot Rod Forum : Hotrodders Bulletin Board (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/)
-   Suspension - Brakes - Steering (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/suspension-brakes-steering/)
-   -   Mecanical disc brake caliper for parking brake? (http://www.hotrodders.com/forum/mecanical-disc-brake-caliper-parking-brake-76175.html)

bigun 12-14-2005 10:01 PM

Mecanical disc brake caliper for parking brake?
 
Sorry if this has been posted I know I saw it somewhere all my searches came back not found. One of the big problems with disc's on the rear is how do you get parking brakes back? there have been various ideas floating around and the problem has been addressed by different OEMS. I have a dedicated off road truck some events we go to because of insurance demand that we have a parking brake, line locks do not count. Adapting an OEM set up would be nice but my truck runs 3/4 ton running gear with a full floater rear diff. So the other day I was reading somewhere on line and saw this little Jewell. http://www.airheart-brakes.com/cal-mb1.html

Triaged 12-14-2005 10:26 PM

What running gear do you have? aka what axles, t-case, etc. including make and year.

I have an E-brake from http://www.highangledriveline.com/E-...plications.htm that goes on the output shaft of my 205 t-case. It works well enough to stop the truck on anything the tires will grip on. Some vehicles (like motorhomes) had driveshaft mounted e-brakes...most of them were drum.

The problem with wheel disc e-brakes is that they weren't meant to handle the added leverage of large tires and low gearing. Drum e-brakes work good at the wheel but only forward.

I think your best bet is a driveshaft mounted disc or drum.

powerrodsmike 12-14-2005 11:03 PM

I know 2 words that can describe those calipers. Poo Poo. I have taken 2 sets of those mechanical calipers off and thrown them away. Wilwood used to sell them as an add on E brake to the hitech rear disc brake they sold. They are designed for go-carts. They are so poorly suited for automotive use that wilwood won't sell them anymore. That is a statement in itself. They won't hold the car on any incline,(certainly not a truck), They rattle when you are driving and if you don't get the adjustment right they will fry your rotors. They will get you past tech inspection though. Follow triaged's advice. He is wise.

bigun 12-15-2005 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Triaged
What running gear do you have? aka what axles, t-case, etc. including make and year.

I have an E-brake from http://www.highangledriveline.com/E-...plications.htm that goes on the output shaft of my 205 t-case. It works well enough to stop the truck on anything the tires will grip on. Some vehicles (like motorhomes) had driveshaft mounted e-brakes...most of them were drum.

The problem with wheel disc e-brakes is that they weren't meant to handle the added leverage of large tires and low gearing. Drum e-brakes work good at the wheel but only forward.

I think your best bet is a driveshaft mounted disc or drum.

Right now I am running a Hybred Cherokkee/J20. 1976 Cherokee frame,360 AMC,T18, a Scout dual stick Dana 20, axles, and cab are J20 are from a 1975, the front fenders are M715 and the rear are Allis Chalmers tractor, fuel is propane.
build up can be found here
http://www.alaska4x4network.com/showthread.php?t=7778
The problem with a T case brake is what happens if you loose a drive shaft or break an axle? Oh by the way I have no parking brake at this time as some one removed the hardware from the J20 axle and while it was still a Cherokee I snaged the cable on a rock! I saw these and thought some one might be interested

Triaged 12-15-2005 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigun
happens if you loose a drive shaft or break an axle?

...and what happens if the e-brake cable snaps (oh wait...you already did that)...or if the peddle snaps off...or if the shoes freeze up from getting mud in them...or if...

You will always have something that can go wrong. I have known some people that spent $$ putting on caddy e-brake calipers and were not happy with it when they were done. You still have the cables hanging down low where they can get snagged (which you already figured out) and most calipers won't hold enough with larger tires, heavy trucks, and on hills.

The high angle driveline kit requires you to use one of his (Jess...very cool guy!) 1-ton CV driveshafts. You would have to try very hard to kill that.

Also remember that when you are in 4wd the front and rear axle are locked together. If you loose the rear driveshaft (or an axle etc.) your truck still won't roll away because your front wheels will be holding you.

If you don't have the money for the high angle kit you still have a few options. You can either find a small car with disc brakes at the j/y and pick up the caliper and rotor and get creative hooking it up. You could also make your own plate steel rotor, mount, and buy just the caliper from Jess.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:45 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
Copyright Hotrodders.com 1999 - 2012. All Rights Reserved.